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UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY 
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING SERVICE 



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UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY 
PRESERVATION MICROFILMING SERVICE 



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UCLA 
DAILY BRUIN 



Summer 2002 

(Orientation Edition) 



through 



September 11, 2002 



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THE UNIVERSITY O 



F CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES 



DAILY 



Sermruj the UCLA community since 1919 




Orientation Issue 




SUMMKR 2002 



www.dailybruiauda.e(fai 



, ''Bear in 
mind that the 
wonderful 
things you 
learn in your 
i schools are 
I the work of 
many genera- 
tions. All this 
is put in your 
hands as your 
inheritance 
in order that 
you may 
receive it, 
honor it, add 
to it, and one 
day faithfully 
hand it on to 
your 

children. " 

-Albert Einstein 



News 



MunVMJS I It's never too 
late to change career 
aspirations. Page 12 



Viewpoint 

1'adRion | An la. Hmes 
journalist recounts what 
made his UCLA experience 
memorable. Page 12 



A&E 



Thaatar Profle | Caroi 

Burnett started her 
comedic ascent here at 
UCLA Page 18 

FHm Apocalypse | ucla 

grad Francis Ford 
Coppola predicts the 
death of film. Page 18 

Sports* 

Rivalry | The history of 
USC-UCLA,oneofthe 
greatest rivalries in col- 
lege sports. Page 30 





\ 



1928 " 2002 

I'lK.Tos iKoM IMvKusiTY AudiiVKs \Ni» TYSON KVANS/Dmi.v Himin SKNK.U ST^^T 



THE DAILY BRUIN -ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



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NEWS 



KAe KA KKT DBOAEn 



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RECRUITMENT 2002 

IING A FRATERNITY IS FUN, SIMPLE & EASt 






REGISTER WITH THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

Register now for Fall Recruitment! There is no cost or obligation and 
you will be mailed information over the summer.. 

n E-mail ifc@ucla.edu □ Stop by 105 kerckhoff Hall 

Q Register online at www.ifc.ucla.edu j 

ATTEND IPC RECRUITMENT INFORMATION EVENTS 

IFC will hold a kick-off event and information forum before recruitment 
begins. At these events, learn about the Recruitment process, and meet 
representatives from each of UCLA's fraternities. 

ATTEND CHAPTER RECRUITMENT EVENTS 

Each fraternity schedules a variety of events which include meals 
speakers, activites, etc. This is the best opportunity to meet brothers 
of each chapter and evaluate each fraternity on a personal level. 



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UCLA Interfraternity 

Council 

Fall 2002 Schedule 

Monday, September 23 



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12-3 pJli- .JCick-off Fair and Reception 



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Get involved on campus 




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Fripnrifihips for Life 



Questions: Contact U^M 105 
Kerckhoff, 310/825-7878 or 



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SOKORITV "ECRUITMENf 2002 




Spring Break 2001: Unforgettable memories witti your sister < 



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Afafeng a difference in the community, soroities 
provide a charwe for mentoring kids 




Dear New Bruin, 

Congratulations on attending UCLA! You 
may be wondering what sorority life is like. As a 
woman who had no intentions of joining a sorority 
upon entering UCLA, I understand your confu- 
sion. After deciding to go through sorority recruit- 
ment on a whim, I have realized it was one of the 
best decisions I have made while at UCLA. 

Being in a sorority has given me opportuni- 
ties that are not available through any other 
organization on campus. Not only does my sorori- 
ty provide schdiarship opportunities, leadership 
positions, philanthropic service and affordable 
housing, it has become my home at UCLA. My 
sisters are my family at UCLA and the friendships 
I have made are priceless. 

As I enter my senior year, I appreciate what 
the Greek system has given me even more. I 
encourage you to learn mpre about Greek life and 
discover its opportunities available to you. 
Sincerely, 

Becca Melville 

Panhellenic Director of Recruitment 



Women's Recruitment 




ick-off Fal 



mSmrnt^ 



rientation M 
oore 100 







LI 1 1 1 1 1 Al 4 f-^:<*--r^tC^^i 



Mom's Day and Dad's Day's provide opportunities to 
share your sorority experience with you pa nnis 



Tuesday, September 24 

9 am Potential MembeT 

@ Bruin Walk 

Tuesday, September 24 

10 am 11 Events 
7:25 pm 

Wednesday, September 2 

9:30 am 8 Events 
6:00 pm 

Thursday, September 21 

9:30 am 8 Events 
6:00 pm 

Friday, September 27 

6 pm Preference Nig 

10 pm * 

Saturday, September 28 

2 pm Bid Day 



;heck-l 



FOR QUESTIONS & REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Email: panhel@ucla.edu and leave your name, summer address & phone 
number, or call 310/206-1521, or you can find on-line registration 
at www.jfc.ucla.edu/Danh6llenlc 

Watch out for our 2002 Greek Life Booklet which will be mailed to p i ugt ug -^ 

x/CHECK IT OUI..GET INVililO! 

I www.greeklife.ucla.edu 

nKA nKO 2AE EX 2N 20E in 0X AFA 





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NEWS 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 ■ THE DAILY BRUIN 3 



'Fiat Lux' offers Smaller class setting 



By Dorothy Augustynlak 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
daugustyniak@media.ucla.edu 

Incoming students looking for a 
more personal, informal learning 
environment may take interest in 
the "Fiat Lux" seminar series, 
which grew out of last year's Sept. 
11 seminars. 

The College of Letters & 
Science will launch Fiat Lux - 
which is also the university's 
motto, meaning "Let There Be 
Light" - this fall. The series offers 
150 one-unit seminars to under- 
graduates, mainly freshmen. The 
seminars aren't all about terror- 
ism, and faculty members can pre- 
pare a class on any topic. 

The seminars give freshmen the 
opportunity to be able to commu- 
nicate with their professors in the 
classroom as opposed to an intro- 
ductory class with over 300 stu- 
dents, where such communication 
is limited. 

First-year students have enroll- 
ment priority for the seminars, and 
the classes will have between 10 
and 20 people each. 



Fiat Lux offers opportunities "to 
enhance the undergraduate expe- 
rience by providing community 
services and research with a pro- 
fessor along with the seminars," 
said College spokesman Harlan 
Lebo. 

Second-year history student 
Annie Kang said the Sept. 11 semi- 
nars expanded her knowledge in 
politics because she had the 
opportunity to communicate more 
with her professor. 

"I never considered knowledge 
of politics to be important. 
Because of the Sept. 11 seminar, I 
am now considering a minor in 
political science," she said. 

One student did not find the 
Sept. 11 seminars valuable to her 
educational experience, leading 
her to drop out of them. 

"As a South Campus student, it 
does not make any difference to 
me what the size of the classroom 
is. I am still able to learn the mate- 
rial and know my professors," said 
third-year psychobiology student 
Lynn Waters. 

Fiat Lux seminars are offered 
under Honors Collegium 98 



t 

through URSA. Grading is on a 
pass/no pass basis and a pass will 
carry an he ors notation on the 
student's transcript. 

Undergraduates who wish to 
enroll in these seminars do not 
have to be honors students. 

The Fiat Lux seminars are orga- 
nized into three categories: 
Arts/Humanities, Culture/Society 
and Science/Technology. 

From religion to culture to art, 
the seminars offered this fall range 
from a number of specific topics. 

One seminar, "Fundamentalism 
or Restoration of Eroded Islamic 
Values," focuses on eliminating 
misconceptions about Islam in the 
Farghona Valley, an Islamic strong- 
hold in Uzbekistan. 

Another seminar, "Museums 
and the Fabrication of Identity: A 
Critical Investigation" focuses on 
whether museums and other art 
institutions fabricate and maintain 
connections between artworks 
and the mentality, character and 
identity of national groups. 

Fiat Lux is just one of the 
changes the College has created in 
an effort to give students a more 



to 



interdisciplinary approach 
learning. 

For instance, the Student 
Research Program began in 1985, 
allowing undergraduates to per- 
form research with a faculty mem- 
ber of their choice while working 
on an individual project. 

Another program is the fresh- 
men General Education clusters, 
which began in 1997. The CoUege's 
General Education Cluster 
Program is a curricular initiative 
designed to strengthen the intel- 
lectual skills of entering freshmen, 
introduce them to faculty research 
work, and expose them to semi- 
nars and interdisciplinary study. 

This trend continued with the 
emergence of the Sept. 11 semi- 
nars by incorporating media 
sources and personal experiences 
of faculty and students. UCLA's top 
nuclear weapons expert - 
Chancellor Albert Carnesale - 
taught one of the seminars. 



Information about the Fiat Lux 
program is available at 
http://www. ucla. edu/fiatlux. 



Ward off 

warts with 

protection 

against STDi 



By Rachel Makabi 

DAILY BRUIN STAFF 

rmakabj@media.ucla.edu 

As you taste college life in the 
mad rush of scavenger hunts and 
meaty barbeques at orientation, you 
may look at the new people around 
you and wonder if you will end up 
sleeping with any of them. Chances 
are, you very well may. 

But you probably aren't thinking 
that the sizzling stranger you meet 
may be among the 20 percent of 
Americans with a sexually transmit- 
ted disease. 

Joel Goldman 



Squirrels gone 

LOVE OR HATE 'EM, THESE RODENTS 

ARE AS BIG A FIXTURE OF THE UCLA 

CAMPUS AS ROYCE HALL 




ended up contracting two 
from having unprotected sex. The 
first time, he took his prescriptions 
and didn't make any life changes. 
The second time, he got HIV. 

"You have to look at the behavior 
that causes it because if it's not HTV, 
it could eventually lead to that 
down the road," said Goldman, who 
now travels and speaks to college 
students about his e^qperiences. 

Many students get caught up in 
the fun and adventure of college life 
without realizing how quickly STDs 
spread in the university conununity, 
Goldman continued. 

Though abstinence is the only 
way to completely protect against 
an STD, latex condoms and dental 
dams are the next most effective 
methods of protection for people 
who want to be sexually active. 

Most students know STDs are 
out there, but are in denial about 
the possibility that they could ever 
contract one, said Ann Brooks, a 
Nurse Practitioner at the ASHE 
Center who has been speaking with 
students with STDs for 22 years. 

Incoming freshman Justin 
Keyashian doesn't think many peo- 
ple at UCLA will have an STD. 

"College life will bring a lot more 
fun and freedom," Keyashian said, 
but added he thinks people are 
aware about the risks and will take 
necessary precautions. 

Other students disagreed about 
the risks. 

"I know some people just don't 
care too much and don't take the 
necessary precautions," said fourth- 
year math student Alfredo Olvera. 

Arnold Pena, a fifth-year psy- 
chobiology student agreed, saying 
people who come to college are 

STD I Page 7 



By Marcelle Richards 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
mrichards@media.ucla.edu 

The gray squirrel crouches in 
the scrub beneath a canopy of 
canary Island pines in the uni out- 
back. 

Crikey, she's a big one! 

She spots an unsuspecting 
human resting by the campus 
watering hole, a Taco Bell burrito 
in hand. The poor bloke is prone 
to squirrel ambushes due to his 
habitual nose-in-books behavior 

never did .a^^,. ^«\-».?^^lJC¥^ from tree to tree, 

' "" ' " ' tnmks, the 



rf'g' l 





maps out its 
plan of 

attack in cal- 
c u 1 a t e d 
squirrel 
leaps. 

The squir- 
rel nudges 
closer, 
standing on 
its haunches 
as it readies 
to hunt down 
the hunted. 

It's a face- 
off. The squirrel uses its secret 
weapon - the I'm-so-cute-so-give- 
me-a-gobful squirrel stare of 
death. 

The human is relentless, using 
his equally powerful defense 
mechanism of feigned apathy. 



TYSON EVANS/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

A squirrel stares down the camera while 
scavenging for food near Baiin Walk. 



avoiding eye 
contact and 
ignoring the 
persistent 
rodent 

Winding 
back, wiggling 
its rump 
body language 
for "your burri- 
to is mine" - the squirrel bounds 
forward as the human leaps and 
choffs off like a croc on fire. 

The burrito, half -consumed 
and vulnerable in its peeled back 
waxed paper wrapping Hefr help-' 
less on the lawn as the squirrel 
wrangles the bludger and drags it 

to a nearby 
tree, defying 
the signs that 
read "do not 
feed the 
squirrels." 

Love them 
or hate them, 
squirrels are 
inseparable 
from the 
UCLA expe- 
rience. 

They are 
the unsound- 
ed campus 
power animal. 

Their die-hard pursuits for 
food grace organic chemistry 
midterm questions; Spring Sing 
lyrics reference "squirrel 
attacks"; they've even become the 
re-occurring subject on squirrel- 




devotionist Web sites. 

The Campus Squyrel Listings 
on Jon's World O' Squirrels site is 
among them with its rankings of 
58 campuses across the nation for 
squirfcl-fri end kness. 

UCLA placed with three squir- 
rel heads out of five, five being 
the most squirrel-friendly. 

The explainer reads: "Some of 
(the squirrels) look underfed and 
mangy. In general there is a short- 
age of squirrel-friendly trees on 
this campus. Most of the students 
seem to have very little interest in 
their 'squirrel resources.'" 

Jon Gottshall, a librarian for 
the Los Angeles Times, started 
the rankings in 1995 while study- 
ing at California State University, 
Fullerton. The rankings are based 
on e-mails messages and personal 
experiences. 

The site gave California State 
University, Fullerton a negative 
one ranking: "There was a colony 
of California ground squirrels 
near the humanities building, 
until they POISONED THEM ALL 

SQUIRRELS I Page 8 



SguirreJ friendliness of California wunpusM 



UCLA is a fairly welcoming habitat for squirrels, though not so much as UC Berkeley or Stanford. 

School Rank Comment i 



^ray SqulrrA are Wrly common at UCLA. They can oflen be found around the trees near the 
JMW^gsJofne of them look underfed and mangy, however, in general there is a stxxlage of 
squrrel-Mendly trees on ttiis campus. Most of the students seem to have very little interest in their 
'squirrBl resources. "" 



UC Berkeley 



»!(»«» 



iZIIS.^!!^ ***^ ptece rvefoundfbr a squirrel session. The hisJi landscaping supports lots of big 
fMiy FOK Squrreis. and mai^ of the students and visitors there seem to reaMy s^jpreciate them! 

There has been some discussion atxM whether or not Stanford has better squirrels.' 



UCIrvine 



» 



T »«8 a sbidem here for ftxr years and never saw a single squirrel. Campus trees are mostly 
tucalyptus and othw exotic stuff - worthless flrom a squirr*watchers perspective." 



Stanford 



ViVV 



'Thewor^ that Stanford has kas of scyjirrels and toveiy grounds t^ 

y y^* "jys- "n«f^ are large oalcs and lots of wooded areas. There are also lots of Black 

SWarrwujWch caraxx be found m many other parts of the bay area. This campus really belongs to 



KJBy Most squirrel fhendty 



source: Jon Gottahaa^ World O' Squin^i. 



ggggy 



Least squint! friendly 



CHRIS MONTALVO/Daily Bhi in Senior Staff 



campus for UCLA 




JONATHAN VOL N<j/L>Aiu Bki in Senior Staff 

Erid Chwoong of UCLA Extension prepares a sandwich at the 
Cooperage in Ackerman Union, where many students are employed. 



By Sabrina SInghapattanapong 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 
ssinghapattanapong@media.ucla.edu 

From the College library to the 
Village's Gap store, UCLA students 
need not look past Westwood to find 
jobs. 1 

Currently, 1,500 students are 
working at various Associated 
Students of UCLA locations, such as 
Wetzel's Pretzels and the UCLA 
Store, said Patricia Eastman, execu- 
tive director of ASUCLA. This fall, 
ASUCLA is seeking to hire up to 800 
more students, Eastman said. 
Westwood businesses also rely heav- 
ily on student workers to operate. 

Many UCLA students, hke first- 
year business economics student 
Brian Park - who works about ten 
hours a week at Wetzel's - feel that 
working takes away from their per- 
sonal time. But Park said these time 



constraints push him to use his time 
more wisely by studying more often. 

Both on- and off-campus jobs usu- 
ally require students to work a mini- 
mum number of hours per week. 

At the UCLA Store's customer ser- 
vice section, employees are expected 
to work a minimum of ten hours a 
week, said Jennifer Gordon, a UCLA 
Store customer service manager. 
However, each department has its 
own requirements, Gordon said. 

For France Vu, a third-year theater 
student, working ten hours a week - 
at the UCLA Store's BearWear 
department - can be "a little monoto- 
nous" during long shifts. 

With these time constraints, stu- 
dents should make sure that the 
classes they're taking aren't "going to 
kill" them before taking up a job, said 
Erica Andrews, who works in the 

JOBS I Page ^ 




UCLA Student Media 

Orientation staff members check in new Bruins on the session's first day last 
year. Students receive a stack of guides and enrollment information. 

Orientation 
aims to ease 

transitions 



By Rosette Gonzales 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
rgonzales@media.ucla.edu 

As some students leave UCLA as 
graduates, others are just begirming 
their lives as Bruins. 

The UCLA Orientation program 
wiU begin its series of orientation 
sessions July 8, for both entering 
first-years and transfer students. 

It's an exciting time for most stu- 
dents as they are introduced into the 
UCLA conmiunity and for some, col- 
lege, for the first time. 

However, orientation, and the 
introduction to UCLA in general, 
can be a bit overwhelming at first 

Sessions for first-year students 
last a total of three days, from 8 am. 
to 5:30 p.m. each day, including a 
two-night stay at Sproul Hall. 
TVansfer students endure an intense 
one-day-long session from 7:30 am. 
to 9 p.m. 

During each session, students 
will have the opportunity to meet 
with a peer counselor to discuss 
their academic coursework, learn 
how to navigate URSA in order to 
enroll in classes, and meet other stu- 
dents who will be their peers at 
UCLA 

Roxanne Neal, director of UCIA's 
orientation program, said for most 
freshmen, this is their first exposure 
to college, whereas transfer stu- 
dents are already familiar with mak- 
ing the transition to a college envi- 
ronment 

Also, for most first-year students, 
orientation is the first exposure to 
what it will be like to live away fi-om 



home. 

"For many students ... it's their 
first time away fi-om their parents, 
whether out of state or not," said 
Nichol Davis, a recent graduate and 
current orientation counselor. 

Students can be "a little anxious," 
Davis said, but each student will 
have enough time with a counselor 
and activities like the scavenger 
hunt "Carpe Noctem" to help 
release the stress of choosing fall 
classes and dealing with URSA, she 
added. 

First-year sessions include a pre- 
sentation on sexual health, sub- 
stance and alcohol abuse and 
acquaintance rape. According to 
Neal, these topics used to be cov- 
ered in the transfer sessions but the 
program found that "most of (trans- 
fer) students have been exposed to 
these issues before coming to 
UCLA" 

Besides discussing sex, drugs and 
alcohol, the fi-eshmen students get 
to participate in "Carpe Noctem," 
watch the staff put on a variety 
show for them called "Cabaret," and 
learn UCLA's spirited 8-cla^. 

Tbtfisfer students do not partici- 
pate in these activities during their 
orientation sessions. 

According to Brian Chan, a peer 
counselor and third-year computer 
science and engineering student, 
transfer sessions take on a more 
academic focus at evaluating 
coursework. 

First-year sessions are more of an 
introduction to how college works 

ORIENTATION | Page 10 



I* 

Greek life can provide 
home away from home 



By Shane Nelson 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
snelson@media.ucla.edu 

Though UCLA is one of the 
largest pubhc universities in the 
nation, there are a wide variety of 
niches that make it smaller - some 
students find their home in Greek 
life. 

Currently there are 47 Greek 
organizations that 
represent 12 per- 
cent of the under- 
graduate student 
population, 
according to the 
Center for Student 
Programming and 
Fraternity & 

Sorority Relations. 

Most are gen- 
dered organiza- 
tions - the 18 fra- 
ternities located 
west of campus 
near Gayley 

Avenue and the 11 
sororities located 
on the east side of 
campus on Hilgard 
Avenue - with a 
focus on social net- 
working and phil- 
anthropy. 

But there are 
also many others that cater to spe- 
cific interests such as business, pre- 
medical studies, community service, 
ethnic affiliation and age. 

One such organization is Alpha 
Gamma Epsilon, the only coed 
"sorofrat" catering to non-tradition- 
al students, 25 years and older. 

Membership in the sorofrat helps 
people to adjust to life after a break 
in schooling, said 2001 -'02 President 



Olivia Naturman, who just graduat- 
ed with degree in history. 

Greek life can offer a variety of 
advantages, such as a social support 
network to help make adjustment to 
college life easier, ftatemity and 
sorority members say. 

After leaving family at home, stu- 
dents can join a new one at school, 
said fifth-year international eco- 
nomics student Vic Wasu, the social 




McuLt MILLEK/Uaii.y Briin Staff 

Phi Kappa Psi presented over 600 books to the Children's 
Health Clinic at UCLA Medical Center on June 4. 



chair of Delta Phi Beta:^ a young 
coed fraternity with mostly South 
Asian members. 

"Your brothers and sisters are 
there for you for anything. If you 
need a ride, emotional stuff, whatev- 
er," he said. ^ 

Then there is the widely- 
renowned trademark of Greek 

GREEKS I Page 6 



4 



1 ■ 



TOE miLY BmilW •ORIEN TATION ISSUE 2002 



NEWS 



USAC provides a Alumnus changes career despite major 



Ayay to get involved 



i By Robert Salonga I 

bAlLY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.ucla.edu 

I Many incoming Bruins look- 
ing to continue their involve- 
ment in student government 
from high school to college 
should prepare for a variety of 
options at UCLA. 

"We do a lot more than what 
high school governments do," 
said Chris Neal, external vice 
president of the Undergraduate 
Students Association Council. 

The 13-member board based 
in Kerckhoff Hall represents 
the largest undergraduate stu- 
dent body in the University of 
California, with nearly 24,000 
students. 

Councilmembers perform a 
variety of activities ranging 
from serving on bodies that 
decide academic pohcy to 
putting on 
marathons 
in support 
of cancer 
research. 

The 
chance to 
g e t 
involved in 
the offices 
are readily 
available, 
said USAC 
President 
David 
Dahle. 

-They 
can be 
involved in 
real world 
issues, " 
Dahle said. 
•You 
can listen 
about it in 
a political 
science 

claims, but ^ 

USAC 
deals with it daily," he added. 

In the next year USAC faces 
an increase in the number of 
units first and second-year stu- 
dents must complete each quar- 
ter and a $30,000 cut from last 
year's programming budget. 
Students can directly access 




TYSON EVANS/DAILY Brcin Senk.r Stakk 

USAC President David Dahle urges 
incoming students to join council staff. 



academic policy through the 
Academic Affairs Office, which 
appoints student representa- 
tives to university-wide bodies 
like the Academic Senate. 

It can expand a person's 
UCLA view, said Chris Diaz, 
academic affairs commissioner. 
"You leave with a better 
understanding of how the uni- 
versity operates," he said. 

As EVP, Neal's office is 
unique because a substantial 
amount of their work done is 
outside campus - working with 
national, state and other UC 
student governments. 

Neal has traveled to 
Sacramento, lobbying to keep 
student fees level and keep the 
BruinGo! bus program. 

This is not accessible to 
most people, to work on a state 
and national level," Neal said. 
All of the offices are accept- 
ing apphca- 
tions for staff 
positions, 
and empha- 
size that on- 
the-job train- 
ing is avail- 
able. 

"No expe- 
rience is 
needed , " 
Neal said. 

Crisette 
Leyco heads 
the Student 
Welfare 
Commission, 
focusing on 
health and 
well-being of 
students. 

Largely a 
program- 
ming com- 
mission, the 
SWC puts on 
events such 
as the annual 
city-wide 
Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric 
AIDS Foundation dance 
marathon, the UCLA IronBruin 
Triathlon and blood drives. 

"You can experience organiz- 
ing large-scale events all over 



USAC I Page 10 



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By Jamie Hsiung 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER ' 
jhsiung(S)media.ucla.edir' 

Isaac Yang's career plans always 
involved helping people, even as he 
went from being a social welfare stu- 
dent to a medical student 

Yang, who graduated from UCLA in 
1995 with a social welfare degree, is in 
his second year of studying to become 
a neurosurgeon at the UCLA Medical 
School. 

His stoiy may be of interest to 
undergraduate students looking for a 
maior, perhaps the decision should 
not be too stressful. After all, one does 
not always need to go to work in a 
field directly related to his or her spe- 
cial area of study as a UCLA under- 
graduate. I 

Volunteer experience in the emer- 
gency room at UC San FYancisco 
Medical Center strengthened Yang's 
decision to become a doctor 

During his four months there, where 
his duties ranged from paperwork to 
performing CPR and talking to 



patients, he was impressed with the 
high amount of trust patients placed in 
their doctors. He compared the doctor- 
patient relationship to a mother-child 
relationship. 

After graduating from UCLA, he 
worked as a social welfare outreach 
worker for a year, trying to get people 
to change insurance. In the end, he felt 
he was not really helping people as 
much as he could be. Becoming a doc- 
tor would have a greater impact on 
people's lives, he thought 



Then 




He loved the 
social welfare 
m^gor at UCLA - 

even though it's not a typical m^yor 
for someone who becomes a medical 
student. The mjyor wasn't too com- 
petitive, and very well-rounded, he 
said. 

He liked how it was all about trying 
to help people as compared to sociol- 



ogy, where it's more academic, more 
about understanding people and less 
about actually helping them, he said. 

Compared to his work at the 
Medical Center, it is not too different, 
he said. 

"Premeds are typically hypercom- 
petitive, but UCLA ... is laid back ... 
everyone helps one another," Yang 
said. 

He started taking medically related 
classes his third year with mixed reac- 
tions from friends and family when 
they discovered he want- 
_ ed to switch careers. It 

C/(_y meant continuing college 
longer, more student fees 
and not using his under- 
graduate degree in the real world. 

But they were stiU encouraging, he 
said, wanting to make sure that head- 
ing to medical school was what he 
really wanted - in the end, the diffi- 
culties were worth it 

"The doctors wanted to help these 
people, and they totally make a differ- 
ence," he said. "How could you put a 
price on that?" 



Petitions 
may resolve 




BruinCards are tickets to L.A. with BruinGo! 



By Peu'ean Tsai 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
ptsai@meclia.ucla.edu 

Getting off campus and around Los 
Angeles isn't the hassle it could be, 
thajiks to the BruinGo! program, 
which offers free bus transportation 
simply with the swipe of a valid Bruin 
card. I , 

TTie program, entering its third year 
this fall, allows UCLA students, faculty 
and employees to ride the Santa 
Monica Big Blue Bus free of charge 
during the regular school year fi^om the 
end of September to mid-June. While 
the program waives fares for individu- 
als, it costs UCLA transportation ser- 
vices 45 cents per person, a discounted 
rate from the regular 50<!ent fare. 

Ttie program benefits students who 
commute to campus, do not have cars, 
or are denied parking because of the 
high demand for permits. 

Most first-year students who live in 
on-campus dormitories do not have 
their own cars, and oft^n have no way 
of getting away from campus, said 
Imelda DeVera, a fourth-year molecu- 
lar, cell and developmental biology stu- 
dent 

Whether they live a car-less exis- 



BruinGo! routes 



students can use their BruinCard to ride the Big Blue Bus around Los Angeles for free 



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tence or were denied parking, first- 
years can benefit from a free trans- 
portation system like BruinGo!, she 
said. 

Though the UCLA campus and 



Westwood offer adequate resources 
for students within walking distance, 
students often want to explore other 

BRUINGO I Page 7 



troubles 



By Marceile Richards 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
mrichards@media.ucla.edu 

The bad news: you've dug yourself 
into an academic rut 

The good news: your solution may 
just be a petition or office visit away. 
In the scenario you find yourself 
needing to drop a class, seek an 
incomplete or dodge dismissal fix)m 
the university you can save yourself 
with a few quick tips. 

Faculty interviewed said the best 
thing to do when in trouble is to talk 
to the professor. 

"The hardest thing for an instruc- 
tor is petitions that appear in your 
box, without a face," said classics 
professor Sander Goldberg, who 
also dislikes e-mail as a form of com- 
munication. 

"Figure out a way to get together," 
he said. 

Students seeking to drop a class 
during the quarter must pay a smaU 
fee after the second week and obtain 
the professor's signature after the 
fourUi week. 

Professors differ in their policies 
for allowing drops, but biology pro- 
fessor Arthur Gibson said he is "usu- 
ally pretty forgiving." 

"I don't mind signing drop forms 
up until the last day," he said "I dont 
require a life stoiy. That's not my 
job." 

TTiere is also a retroactive drop 
petition, for individual courses and 
quarters, which requires an explanar 
tion of why the drop is necessary. 

Students must also provide some 
form of proof, such as pay check 
stubs or a medical note, to verify 
their reasons for dropping. 

The College of Letters & Science 
cautions against retroactive drops 
since repeat petitions may not be 
granted. 

With counselor approval, students 
may also seek to drop an entire quar- 
ter. This may help those on academ- 
ic probation or subject to dismissal if 
the drop will result in a higher GPA. 

ACADEMICS I Page 10 





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you come in for your oppolnrmenr. Call 310 208-301 1 to 

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Many campus crimes easily avoidable with caution 



' By Shane Nelson 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 

snelson® media, ucla.edu 

With 68,000 people on campus 
each day, UCLA is often considered 
a self-contained city - complete 
witli a city's share of crime. 

Witli so many people not every- 
one is friendly, but by using com- 
mon sense precautions, many 
crimes can be avoided 

Tlie most common crimes of 
2001 were property crimes - petty 
theft, burglary and motor vehicle 
theft - with 1,594 reported inci- 
dents, according to the UCPD 's 
Annual Report 

Petty theft was the most reported 
property crime and also the most 
preventable, said UCPD spokes- 
woman Nancy Greenstein. 

Also known as "crimes of oppor- 
tunity," the easiest way to prevent 
theft of cell phones, laptops, back- 
packs and other small electronic 
equipment is to keep an eye on 
them. 

Theft from cars is a common 
oicurrence, with parking permits 
stolen all the time. Not only should 
cars be locked, but students should 
place other desirable items out of 
view, police advise. > 

Burglary decreased this year 
because many community mem- 
bers called the police while crimes 
were in progress, which, in many 
cases, prevented ftiture burglaries, 
according to the Annual Report 

"No crime is too small to report," 
Greenstein said. 

Motor vehicle theft at the univer- 
sity is relatively low, she said. UCLA 
parks 21,000 cars per day - more 
than Los Angeles International 
Airport - but only 79 cars were 
stolen la§tyear. 



PREVENTING CRIME REiOURCELIST 

To report a crime, to request an evening 
transport, or to get more information 
and confidential support please contact 
the organizations listed below. 



UCLA Police Department 

(310) 825-1491 
www.ucpd.ucla.edu 

Center for Women &, Men 

(310) 206-8240 or (310) 825-3945 
www.thecenter.ucla.edu 

UCLA Evening Van Service 

(310) 825-9800 
Campus Phone: 5-9800 

CSC Escort Service 

(310) 794-WALK 
Campus Phone: 4-WALK 

Rape Treatment Center 

Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center 
(310) 319-4000 
www.9Tlrape.org 



Source: UCPD Annual Report 

Graphics by GRACIELA 
SANDOVAL/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Charles Lee, a fifth-year psychol- 
ogy and sociology student, was one 
of 58 people to have his car stolen 
in 1999. 

He parked his 1986 El Camino in 
Lot 11 by the residence halls one 
Sunday night mid-spring quarter the 
same way he did each week before. 
Expecting to find his car when he 
returned on FYiday to drive home, 
he found in its place a pile of glass. 

"I was pretty shocked," he said. "I 
didn't really expect my car to be 
stolen fi-om UCLA. It seemed like an 
unlikely place, but I guess it hap- 



pens anywhere." 

Though relatively low, compared 
to the rest of Los Angeles, violent 
crime - rape, robbery, physical 
assault and murder - at UCLA is 
also something students should be 
aware of on campus. 

The most reported violent crime 
of 2001 was robbery. There was a 
significant increase - from 5 to 24 - 
in the number of cases reported in 
2001. However, most were commit- 
ted in the surrounding business and 
residential community of 
Westwood I 

"Campus is pretty safe with 
respect to crimes against persons," 
Greenstein said. 

However, she said people should 
still remain in groups after dark. 

"Be aware of your surroundings. 
It is OK to feel uncomfortable, but 
do something about it," she said, 
adding that students can go to more 
populated areas like the library or 
Ackerman Union. | 

For those still on campus after 
hours, UCLA also has two fi-ee ser- 
vices people can use. Community 
Service Officers, trained to be the 
eyes and ears of the UCPD, are 
available all year finom dusk to 1 
a.m. to walk students, faculty and 
visitors between campus buildings, 
to local living areas or to tJieir cars. 
Additionally, a van service regu- 
larly drives students to nearby 
areas Monday through Thursday 

Blue and yellow emergency 
phones are also located all over 
campus. Tliey connect directly to 
the police, and an officer is immedi- 
ately dispatched. I 

But not all violent crinies statis- 
tics tell the whole story. Although 
victims reported five total and 

CRIME I Page 10 



MOST COMMON CRIME STATS 

UCLA campus. Westwood Village, and sur- 
rounding residential community crime sta- 
tistics for 1999 2001. 




l9Wr 



03 

■♦— » 
i- 
O 
Q. 
O) 
l_ 

CO 

cu 
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GREEKS I Groups offer the 
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from page 8 V 

socializing. 

' "FYats do a good job of having 

parties," said Jen Stuart, who 

recently graduated with a degree in 

history. 

Students need socialization, and 

since Westwood has really cracked 

down on entertainment, Nvith few 

bands and dancing, fraternities 

provide the opportunity to meet 

people and have an outlet, she said. 
Greek life can be expensive, 

though. Joining 

can cost more 

than a quarter's 

student fees for 

o f f -c amp u s 

members, but 

students can 

usually opt to 

live in their 

Greek house 

during their sec- 
ond year. Since 

membership fees 

are included 

with room and 

board costs, ^t 

can be cheaper than hving in the 

dorms or in an apartment in 

Westwood. 

Many students feel the cost is 
justified. 

"You pay a lot of money, but it's 
for barbecues, formals and other 
organized activities," said Samuel 
Lau, a Omega Sigma Tau fraternity 
member and recent graduate in 
economics. 

Regardless, Greek life is not for 
everyone. 

Stuart pledged a sorority during 
her first year at UCLA, but decided 
not to stay on. 



"Once you join you negate any 
other individuality you may have," 
she said, adding that members 
unwittingly take on the reputation 
of their sorority. 

But members said a bad Greek 
experience could be due to a per- 
son being incompatible with a par- 
ticular house. 

"If people aren't happy with 
Greek life, then they didn't find the 
right house," said Kathy Gallagher, 
Alpha Phi sorority member and 
fourth-year psychology student 

She added 

that at Alpha 

Phi there is 
no pressure 
to conform 
to everyone 
else in the 
house. 

"It is very 
diverse with 
a million dif- 
ferent per- 
sonalities," 
she added. 

For stu- 
dents think- 
ing about rushing Greek organiza- 
tions, she suggested students listen 
to their instincts. 

"You know yourself better than 
your new dorm floor friends do," 
she said. "If you really want to be 
in one, there is one at UCLA for 
you." 



"You know yourself better 
than your new dorm floor 
friends do. If you really 
want to be in one (Greek 
organization), there is one 
at UCLA for you." 

Kathy Gallagher 
Alpha Phi sorority member 



For more information visit the 
UCLA Fraternity & Sorority 
Relations Web site at unvw.greek- 
life.ucla.edu or for links to specific 
organizations Web sites visit 
www. studentgroups. ucla. edu. 



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ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 7 



BRUINGO 

I i ; from page 4 

areas of Los Angeles, said DeVera. 

II you're looking for a different scene 
like new places to study or for movies that 
can only be seen at the Laemmle and not 
at the Mann on every comer (in 
Westwood), the Big Blue Bus is your 
friend," she said. 

For some students, the advantages of 
BruinGo! extend beyond recreational con- 
venience. 

The program opens up housing options 
for students, allowing them to consider 
locations other than those on or near cam- 
pus by giving commuter students free 
public transportation, said Vinh Le, a 
fourth-year economics and history stu- 
dent 

High rent rates in Westwood exploit 
students who want to be closer to cam- 
pus, but BruinGo! allows students to live 
farther away and pay lower rents, said Le. 
Students not only save money by having 
the option of living outside of high-priced 
Westwood, but by taking the Big Blue Bus 
instead of driving they save the money 
that would be spent on insurance and 
other personal transportation costs, he 
said 

"With BruinGo! the money saved from 
living far away is no longer wasted on hav- 
ing to get a car," Le added. 

While the program makes recreational 
travel more convenient and "provides a 
broad range of benefits for tran;^x>rta- 
tion," it was established mainly to reduce 
the high demand for campus parking by 
encouraging commuter students and fac- 
ulty to take the bus, said Mark Stocki, 
Director of UCLA TVansportation 



Services. 

TTie issue of whether the program had 
fulfilled this goal was questioned in May, 
when UCLA TVansportation Services eval- 
uated the program's effectiveness against 
its costs as Chancellor Albert Camesale 
considered whether to continue it or not 
during the 2002-'03 year. 

Over the past year, student usage - as 
recorded by information fix)m card swipes 
as individuals board the bus - has 
increased approximately 40 percent, 
showing that the program has become 
more popular, said Stocki. 

Despite the apparent rise in the pro- 
gram's popularity, however, the figures do 
not reflect an increased usage for solely 
commuting purposes, as there has not 
been a significant reduction in the 
demand for campus parking, he said 

During the 2001-'02 year, the program 
cost $900,000 to implement, $618,000 of 
which was funded by a Metro 
TVansportation Authority grant and the 
remainder fix)m revenues from the sale of 
parking permits, Stocki said 

Since grants like these are not typically 
available, funding for the BruinGo! 
Program during the 2002-'03 year will 
come solely out of parking revenues. 

De^ite the debate over funding in the 
future, Stocki is *Veiy optimistic" about 
the program's continuation beyond the 
2002-2003 year and hopes that the pro- 
gram will succeed in providing its primary 
goal of helping those who commute to 
campus. 

The continuation of the fi^ee tran^)orta- 
tion system during the 2002-'03 school 
year will especially be helpful to com- 
muters, as the Santa Monica City Council 
will raise Big Blue Bus rates by 50 pel-cent 
on July 1, hiking the cost of a trip firom 50 
cents to 75 cents. 



Condoms, dental dams safer bet against 




from page t 

"more excited than cau- 
tious." 

At UCLA, the highest 
reported STD is human 
papilloma vims, which 
causes abnormal tissue 
growth and the formation 
of genital warts. 

Of over five thousand 
tests done every year 
through the ASHE center, 
about 5 percent show posi- 
tive results, in the form of 
an abnormal pap smear, for 
HPV. 

In 2001, the Student 
Health Lab reported 69 pos- 
itive tests for chlamydia, 14 
positive tests for gonorrhea 
and three positive tests for 
syphilis. But Brooks said 
the numbers may be higher, 
because some students pre- 
fer to get tested at other 
medical facilities, and oth- 
ers do not know they have 
an STD. 

Even students in monog- 
amous relationships are at 
risk of receiving STDs, 
Brooks said, citing students 
who got sick after their 
partners had affairs or 
unknowingly passed infec- 
tions on because they were 
asymptomatic. 

Other times, students tiy 
to keep their STDs a secret 



firom their partners, though 
doing so is a misdemeanor 
under California Health and 
Safety codes. Brooks said. 

Even with the risks of 
contracting STDs, Brooks 
said most women are more 
concerned about getting 
pregnant than getting an 
infection. She said these 
women take birth control 
or other hormonal methods 
of contraception without 
thinking that these methods 
still leave them vulnerable 
to contracting an STD. 

In addition to using pro- 
tection, students should 
speak openly with their 
partners and have a support 
group of firiends that they 
can speak with if they get 
an STD, Brooks said 

Through networking, 
students are bound to find 
others with similar experi- 
ences, she added 

One thing Goldman says 
he wishes he knew about 
STDs before he came to 
college is how easy they are 
to catch, especially in a 
large university. 

"I hope people realize the 
long term effects of the 
decisions they are making 
right now," Goldman said 
"People don't think things 
through. I know I didn't, 
even after one warning." 



SEXUALLY TRANSMIHED DISEASES 



Symptoms and descriptions of some of the most common STDs. 

like appearance. 



ADS 

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 
caused by the human immunodeficiency 
virus. 

Symptoms: Initial fever, headache, tiredness, 
and enlarged lymph nodes, which usually dis- 
appear within a month. Severe symptoms 
may not surface for a decade or more after 
HIV first enters the body. 

CHLAMYDIA 

The most common bacterial infection. 

Symptoms: Abnormal genital discharge and 
burning with urination. Many people with 
chlamydial infection have few or no symp- 
toms of infection. 

GENTTAL HERPES 

Herpes simplex virus. 

Symptoms: Painful blisters or open sores in 
the genital area, a tingling or burning sensa- 
tion in the legs, buttocks, or genital region. 
Sores usually disappear within three weeks 
but the virus remains in the body for life and 
the lesions may recur. 

GENTTAL WARTS 

Human papilloma virus, a virus related to the 
one that causes common skin warts. 

Symptoms: At first, small, hard, painless 
bumps appear in the vaginal area, on the 
penis or around the anus. If untreated, they 
may grow and develop a fleshy, cauliflower- 

SOURCE: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious ^ 
Disesases, National Institutes of Health 



GONORRHEA 

A curable bacterial infectkxi. 

Symptoms: Discharge from the vagina or 
penis and painful or difficult urination. 

SYPHILIS 

A treatable bacterial infectton. 

Symptoms: Initially, a chancre, or painless 
open sore, that usually appears on the penis 
or around or in the vagina. It can also occur 
near the mouth, anus or on the hands. If 
untreated, syphilis may go on to more 
advanced stages, including a transient/ash 
and. eventually, serious Involvement of the 
heart and central nervous system. The fun 
course of the disease can take years. 
Penicillin remains the most effective drug to 
treat people with syphilis. 

PUBCUCE 

The very tiny insects that hifiest the pubic hair 
and survive by feeding on human bkxxJ. 

Symptoms: Itching in the pubte area. 

TRICHOMONU^, OR TOCH" 

Parasitkjal Infectkxi of the urethra In men and 
the vagina in women. 

Symptoms: Often occurs without any synip- 
toms, especially in men. In women, a heavy; 
yelk)w-green or gray vaginal discharge, dis- 
comfort during intercourse, vaginal odor and 
painful urination. In men. a thin, whitish dis- 
charge from the penis and painfUl or difficult 
urination. 



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UCLA Summer Sessions 2002 




SummeT Sessions Students: 

Welcome to UCLA! 



Enrollment is still available for 
Session C courses, August 5 - September 13. 

For more Summer Sessions information, visit 
www.summer.ucla.edu or the online Schedule of 
Classes at www.reg1strarucla.edu/schedule. Enroll 
now through URSA Online at www.ursa.ucla.edu. 
Campus parking and on-campus housing are avail- 
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JOBS I Employers can be flexible with schedulin] 



from page 8 

■tore's BookZone. 

There is also room for advancement 
to higher positions at the UCLA Store, 
Andrews said. i 

"If you make an effort, the manage- 
ment is really appreciative - it doesn't 
go unnoticed," she added. 

Students can also work in one of 
UCLA's 15 library sites, in areas rang- 
ing from the College Library 
Instructional Computer Commons 
hbs to book stacks. 

There are about 700 CUCC lab 
clerks and library assistants currently 
working on campus, said Araceh 
Bermudez, a human resources special- 
ist for UCLA libraries. 

Students working in CLICC labs can 
earn anywhere from $9.61 to $10.69 an 
llour, while library assistant hourly 
wages start at $6.83 and increase to 
17.09 after six months of working, 
Bermudez said. 

Those interested in CLICC lab clerk 
positions must be willing to learn and 
should be comfortable using a PC and 
s Mac computer, said Hannah Har, a 
fourth-year cognitive science student. 
"It's mostly a personal service type 
or Job," Har said. 

Though Har enjoys the flexible 



hours and the "really good pay," she 
feels that having to work a fixed num- 
ber of hours each week - even during 
finals - is inconvenient at times. 

Besides on-campus jobs, a number 
of off-campus opportunities exist for 
Bruins too. j 

The Gap in Westwood accepts 
applications year round, according to 
store manager Mark Massey. 

Retail experience, while preferred, 
is not necessary to be considered for a 
position at the Gap, he said. 

Massey added that applicants 
should be customer-service oriented 
and may undergo two rounds of inter- 
views. 

like many students who work in 
and around campus, convenience was 
the reason why Dena Webb, a fourth- 
year sociology student, decided to 
work at the Gap. 

She advises new UCLA students not 
to work much during their first quar- 
ter, since it might take some time 
adjusting to everything. 

Though juggling work and school 
has been a challenge, Webb said that 
the Gap is willing to work with stu- 
dents' schedules. 

Off-campus jobs are available at 
numerous other Westwood business- 
es, including Best Buy, where about 20 



UCLA students are now working, 
according to Ronie Roque, a Best Buy 
media supervisor. 

Starting wages average about $9.00 
an hour and Best Buy employees can 
get -op to 60 percent discounts on 
selected store items, said Shawn 
Johnson, a first-year psychology stu- 
dent. 

In terms of training, new employees 
shadow experienced members in vari- 
ous departments, Johnson said. 

"They take care of you and you end 
up knowing what to do," he added. 

Students can also make some extra 
bucks working at Best Buy's neighbor 
-Ralphs. 

With about eight UCLA students 
currently working at the store, Ralph's 
Store Director, Mark Quinones, wel- 
comes students who are willing to 
work at least 20 hours a week. 

Quinones also prefers candidates 
who dress professionally, have held 
prior jobs for long periods and are 
flexible with their schedules. 

In addition, all new Ralphs employ- 
ees start as courtesy clerks - stocking 
items, helping with maintenance, and 
collecting grocery carts. However, 
workers can be promoted to higher 
levels after six months of working, he 
said. 



SQUIRRELS I Students watch, coax the 



of feedini 



from page 8 

(printed in red letters)." 

Environmental Health & Safety Director Rick 
Greenwood said UCLA does not do anything to 
control its squirrel population. 

There are also no diseases linked to squirrels 
on campus, though students should abstain from 
feeding the squirrels to avoid being bitten. 

"They're wild animals," Greenwood said. 
"Watch them but don't let them eat out of your 
hands." 



The concept seems to be understood as art. Pon passed a tree 



Karapetian, a third-year film student visiting 
from UC Irvine. "If you put a trail for him he'll 
come all the way to the 'TV." 

Students have also reported squirrels falling 
from the sky. 

Amber Locke was taking a walk with her 
brother down Kelton Avenue when her brother 
almost broke the squirrel's fall. 

"It landed an inch from my brother's head," 
said Locke, a 1993 film alumna 

Another unfortunate squirrel hit the concrete 
as computer science master's student Raymond 



unspoken rule as students take up squirrel 
watching instead. 

"I always play with squirrels. Serious," said 
Peter Turman, a fifth-year religious studies stu- 
dent and squirrel enthusiast. "They bring me joy." 

IXuman likes to play peek-a-boo with squir- 
rels. He chases a squirrel around a tree, as it runs 
in the opposite direction around the trunk, 
changing directions and repeating, in what the 
squirrel may interpret to be a foreign mating rit- 
ual. 

Other inter-species activity has crossed over 
into student residences. 

One neighborhood squirrel makes regular vis- 
its to Armen Karapetian's Westwood apartment 
for treats. 

"He'll come all the way to the door," said 



"Thump! It shook itself off and then walked 
off," he said. "like super-squirrel." 

Other squirrel sightings include a squirrel 
drinking out of a Juicy Juice box using the straw, 
squirrels popping out of trash cans and squirrels 
wrestling with each other. 

Greenwood even received a call from a person 
who thought a squirrel was stalking her. 

If squirrels could talk, perhaps they would 
think the same about some humans. 

"I snuck up on a squirrel once," Locke said. "It 
screamed and yelled like it, was going to scratch 
my eyes out" 



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• For Graduate Stadantt 

Come to one of tt)ese groups If you are a 
graduate student wtw would like a safe and 
supportive place to discuss Issues and difficulties 
regarding the TTiesis and DissertatJon wrtting 
process. Call for an intake appointment. Three 
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TUESDAYS 3:00 PM. -5:00 P.M. 825-0768 
WEDNESDAYS 1 :00 P.M. - 3:00 P.M. 825-0768 

THURSDAYS 3:00 P.M. -5:00 P.M. 825-0768 



LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL 

AND TRANSGENDERED 

SUPPORT GROUP 

A support group for students who wish to explore 
their identity and coming out issues, self-esteem, 
and personal and Interpersonal concerns. Call for 
an intake appointment. 

WEDNESDAYS 3:00 P.M. - 5.00 P.M. 825-0768 



MAINTAINING HEALTHY 



OVERCOMING WRITER'S 

BLOCK 

This will be the "hands-on" group. Members will 
bring their laptops (you do not need to have one to 
attend), articles, parts of manuscripts, etc. We will 
explore and wort< through the psychological 
barriers that try to defeat you as you attempt to do 
your work. Call for an intake appointment. 

MONDAY 3:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. 825-0768 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 
PSYCHOTHERAPY GROUP 

A personal exploratkxi group, providing an 
opportunity for graduate students to investigate a 
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effect one's pefformance and progress in scfiool 
as well as other areas in life. The group will 
focus on exploring how the use of drugs and 
alcohol have led to difficulties in one's life, how 
they influence behavior, and ways to prevent 
reoccunring problems. (This group is a 
replacement for UCLA's Conduct Course and Is 
jointly sponsored by Student Psychological 
Services and the Arthur Ashe Student Health and 
Wellness Center.) 

DATES AND TIMES TO BE DETERMINED 825-0768 



The Stress Clinic offers three and four session 
groups each focusing on different coping skills 
and strategies for reducing excessive stress and 
increasing performance effectiveness. The Stress 
Clinic group schedules and other sign-up 
information can be obtained by calling 825-0768 
or visiting the Mid Campus location at 4223 Math 
oCier)C6s. 

COGNITIVE APPROACHES 
TO STRESS MANAGEMENT 

The anwunt of stress a person experiences Is 
often related to how he or she interprets events, 
not just the events themselves. This group will 
focus on identifying beliefs and self-talk that may 
Intensify stress responses and on replacing ttiem 
with more realistic and constructive ways of 
thinking. 

RELAXATION TRAINING 
AND BIOFEEDBACK 

This group is designed to help participants learn 
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Applications must be received by Friday, July 12 to be entered into the 
random draw lottery, Unsuccessful applicants wiU be sent notification and a 
refund in the mail between August 12 and August 23. 

Each applicant may submit one application and request a maximum of 
one SSP. They are non-transferable. You must be a currently enrolled UCLA 
student, possess a UCLA Student ID and ticket to get into the games. 

Assuming UCLA is participating in a post-season footbaU bowl game, or 
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NEMIS 



CRIME I Remaining aware is key to safety 



Transfer 



from page I 

attempted rapes last year, 
Greenstein said it is a category that 
goes highly under-reported 

It is likely there are 10 acts of sex- 
ual violence for every one reported, 
said Tina Oakland, director of the 
Center for Women & Men, which 
specializes in gender-related issues. 

One form of sexual assaults is 
date rape. A good way to prevent 
date rape is to be clear about your 
sexual boundaries, Oakland said, 
adding that students should not 
assume someone else's sexual inten- 



tions. 

Because of the use of date rape 
drugs like Rohypnol and GHB, stu- 
dents should always monitor their 
drinks. 

Side effects of date rape drugs 
resemble the effects of large 
amounts of alcohol and can be lethal, 
according to the Santa Monica Rape 
Treatment Center. It advises to seek 
immediate emergency medical atten- 
tion for someone su^>ected to be 
drugged 

Students also need to be wary of 
their alcohol consumption because a 
hi^ proportion of sexual assaults - 



about 90 percent - is correlated with 
alcohol use, Oakland said 

Despite the reality of crime at 
UCLA, some students still feel safe 
on campus. j 

Ehsan Zaffar, a fourth-year psy- 
chology student who regularly is out 
at 3 or 4 in the morning, said, Tve 
never experienced arty crime, I don't 
know anyone who has, and Tve been 
hereayear." If 



course plannini 



7b keep up with recent crime trends 
in the area, visit 

tututv.ucpd.ucla.ediL 



ACADEMICS I Students may drop courses 
or take incompletes if they face problems 



from page 8 j 

whereas "ijansfers are more con- 
cerned with what they need to 
graduate," Chan said 1 

Emily Walsworth, a recent bio- 
chemistry graduate who entered as 
a transfer, described her experi- 
ence at orientation as "heavy and 
fast-paced" and said meeting with a 
counselor and choosing classes 
were the only reasons for attend- 
ing. 

"Tliey gave you a meal at the 



dorms but I was nmning around so 
much, I didn't have time to eat din- 
ner," said Walsworth. 

Sahba Tafazoli, a business eco- 
nomics and international develop- 
ment studies graduate, remem- 
bered learning how to use URSA as 
a freshman when it was only avail- 
able over the phone. 

Students shared the frustration 
of trying to enroll when many 
courses had already been filled 

"It was the struggle which 
formed a lot of my friendships at 



the begirming," said Tafazoli. 
"Orientation gave you a feeling of 
being part of the school before- 
hand." 

He added that forming new 
friendships and exjjosure to 
diverse backgrounds will be a con- 
stant experience throughout 
UCLA 

So even if the specific content of 
each orientation session differs, 
when that first day of school 
comes, each new student will real- 
ize what it means to be a Bruirt 



from page 4 

Academic probation is asagned to 
students with a GPA that is below 2.0 
and above 1.5 during a quarter or 
overalL 

Sub^lect to dismissal is whea* 

•The student's GPA falls below 1.5 
for a quarter; 

•The student's quarterly GPA falls 
between 1.5 and 2.0 for two consecu- 
tive quarters; 

•TTie student fails to end proba- 
tion after two quarters. 
I When failing a class is inevitable. 



don't take the final. Students who 
take the final will not be able to drop 
the course. 

An alternative to drops is taking 
an incomplete, which allows stu- 
dents to complete coursework over 
the following quarter with permis- 
sion firom the instructor. 

One problem with irKx>mpletes is 
making sure students have the 
means to reach their ends, Goldberg 
said 

He also said he needs to see that 
students taking an incomplete have 
shown progress during the quarter 



and that the student should make 
sure the incomplete is a solution to a 
temporary problem and not a way to 
deny the inevitable - a drop. 

History professor James Gelvin 
said students should not count on an 
incomplete since professor's sched 
ules are subject to change from year 
to year. 

"We travel a lot," he said, adding 
that travel may get in the way of stu- 
dents finishing courses. 

Gelvin tells students to "buckle 
down the first three weeks" to pre- 
vent problems in the first place. 



USAC 

from page 4 

campus," Leyco said 

For those interested in putting 
on entertaiimient-based events, the 
Campus Elvents Commission head- 
ed by Ryan Wilson may be the path 
to take. CEC activities include 
staging free concerts, celebrity 
speakers and the movie series in 
Ackerman Grand Ballroom where 
students can view advanced 
screenings of feature films. 

Additionally, student govern- 
ment can lessen the feeling of 
impersonality that arises out of 
attending a large university like 



UCLA, Wilson said 

"It creates a smaller community 
and with staff support makes for a 
smaller worid on campus," he said 

The Internal Vice President's 
office, led by TJ. Cordero, handles 
a multitude of operations including 
sitting on the transportation board, 
representing USAC to the housing 
administration, and often serving 
as the link between council offices. 

Robbie Clark's Cultural Affairs 
Commission stages several pro- 
grams each year to display the var- 
ious communities that make up 
UCLA, and puts on the well-known 
annual UCLA JazzReggae FestivaL 

The Community Service 
Commission houses the largest 
number of subcommittees of all 



the USAC offices and sponsors 
numerous outreach and tutorial 
efforts throughout Los Angeles. 

Students can also look to the 
Facilities Commission - which 
works to maintain student-fre- 
quented buildings on campus - and 
the Financial Supports 

Commission, which puts on pro- 
grams like the student book-lend- 
ing program. 

But like many extracurricular 
activities, students will have to 
play the balancing act between 
academics and involvement USAC 
is flexible to this reality. 

"You can put as much time as 
you have, even it if it means being 
lightly involved," said General 
Representative Adam Harmetz. 



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browse. 

fgatns 




PWE 



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NEWS 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • DIE DAILY BRUIN tt 



''* - /" < ■ffA^'Of-.t^ ^4V»j*v* 



■■> ' \ ' 




Asian Pacific 




4 'df- 



ifion 



2002^2003 



Join one o^ 044^ 20 



PSA 

Pakistani Student Assn. 

www.boi.uda.edy| - psa 



JUITP 



Asian Aniencan Tutorial Prefect 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/aatp 



APHC 

Asian Pacific HeaKli Cofps 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/aphc 

(ifJtc@44cla.0du 



ACA 



of CMnese Americans 

www.acabruins.com 

aca@44cta,adu 



XSA 



Chinese Student Association 

www.studentgroups.ucia.edu/csa 

tAa 44cla@44cla,edu 



CAPSA 



Concerned API Students for Action 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/capsa 

oafUa@ucla,ed44^ 



HAN OOL UN 

Korean CufturaT Avyareness Gipb 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/kcag 

Jica^@ucla.edu 

HAPA CLUB 

www.geocities.com/uclahapa 

Ui^@ucJa.e4iu 




A 



^O^ 444^ cU 0^UeHicU€OH> ^C^ 

knd an /in^idin Walk. 



HUI O I'MiiOA 

UCLA Hawaii Chib 

Au4 04 mU o a @Jiot m aiLcom^ 




Indian Student Union 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/isu 

liu@44cia.ed4^ 

KSA 

Korean-American Students Assn. 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ksa 

{ iida@44cla.edu 




API IXiBT Awareness Group 

www.studentgroups.ucia.edu/mahu 

mcJu4@44cla.edu 




lAkkel Student Union 

www.ucianikkei.com , 

4tikhe4@44cla.edu 



PISA 

Pacific Islands Student Assn. 

www^tudentgroups.ucla.edu/pier 

f2Ua@44cia.edu 



SAMmHANG 

PI%lno 

uciasaniahang.tripod.com 

ia0Hatumf@44ola.mdu 

JT 

SANGAH 

Progress ve South Asian Org. 

www.studentgroyps.ucla.edu/sangam 

iaHfa4H@44cla.9du 

TAU 

Taiwanese Ameri<:an Union 

www.studentgroups.ucia.edu/tau 

tQ44@44cicLedu 



T§f Al SHJUCOM 

www.bot.ucia.edu/ - thaismak 

tUaUmaA@44cla.edu 



ucs 



United Cambodian students 

www.studentgroups.ucia.edu/ucs 

i4i4H044m.@440ia.edu 



¥SU 



Uletnamese student Union 

www.uciavsu.org 

4j1iu@44cJa.ed44 



Assn. of Hniono students 

BhangraTeam 

fndone^an Bruin 
Student Assn. 

Uia._44cJa@tfaUoa.com. 



m 



o*^o4UfeUioH4.OH.camfuuU*efi^t4i4eHiaHdad4MxU0f^ 



41 9 Kerckhoff Hall - 2240 Campbell Hall - apc@ucla.edu 

www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/apc 



paid for 
liyUSAC 



12 THE DAILY BRUIN -ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



DAILY BRUIN 

Senring the UCLA commuyiity since 1919 

Editorial Board 

Cuauhtemoc ORTEciA, Editor in Chief 

Corey McEleney, Managing Editor 

Cody Cass, Viewpoint Editor 

Kelly Rayburn, News Editor 

Edward Chiao, Stc^ Representative 

Amy Frye, Stc^ Representative 

Derek Lazzaro, Staff Representative 

Robert Salo<jna, Staff Representative 

Amanda Schapel, Staff Representative 



New class must 
combat apathy 

Incoming students should know there is no 
hand-holding at UCLA 

Last year, many of the organizations on cam- 
pus meant to help students - the administration, 
the Associated Students of UCLA, (he on-cam- 
pus Housing Office and student government - 
did the exact opposite by either adopting mea- 
sures that will hurt this year's incoming class, or 
failing to advocate on the students' behalf. Since 
the root {MX)blems these organizations were tiy- 
ing to resolve will persist this year, it is especial- 
ly important that incoming students are made 
aware of what went wrong in order to prevent 
the further erosion in students' quality of life, 
academics and services. 

The administration tried to alleviate the bur- 
den of overcrowding at the university by reduc- 
ing general education requirements, increasing 
the unit value of many classes, and requiring stu- 
dents to take more units per quarter in orxier to 
stay in good academic standing. While these 
changes aim to make students graduate faster, 
none of them directly addresses current stu- 
dents' need for better academic conditions, such 
as smaller classes and more interaction with 
experienced faculty. 

Having students take on larger course loads 
win not only sacrifice extracurricular involve- 
ment, but also continue diluting the already 
ovei^y general and basic instruction they get in a 
rushed quarter system. While these changes may 
help ease overcrowding in the long term, stu- 
dents will pay dearly in terms of the quality of 
education UCLA provides now. Tliis is espedally 
problematic since there are other, better meth- 
ods of both reducing overcrowding and retaining 
the quality of education - capping enrollment, 
for example. 

But the at^ninistration was allowed to stray 
frwn its re^jonsibility of providing a quality edu- 
cation because, outside of a few student organi- 
zations, no one raised a whisper of opposition to 
the changes it instituted 

Regrettably, the administration was not the 
only one to stray from its mission - so did ASU- 
CLA. The pinpose of the organization is to fund 
student programming and groups throng varih 
ous means including campus stores and restau- 
rants. Instead, ASUCLA is in a financial hole 
because it will likely have to provide previously 
neglected benefits for many of its workers in the 
process of unionizing. ASUCLAJs answer to its 
money problem is to have students pay for it the 
antithesis of its intended purpose. Instead of giv- 
ing funding to students, the organization is 
demanding money tram them to stay alive. 

If any campus entity surpasses the administra- 
tion's aiKl ASUCLAjs neglect of student interests, 
it's the Housing Office, as evidenced by its atro- 
cious disregard for student input in the past 
Because of Housing, many students lived in 
study lounges for almost two quarters, people 
were forced to move into different rooms - 
_ sometimes in different buildings - during finals 
week to maximize revenue, and housing costs 
were increased by 7.5 percent for this year. 

TTie On Campus Housing Council is a ffoup of 
students in place to guard against these unfair 
potides. But a lack of active resident support, 
coupled with mediocre advocacy by council 
members, made it impossible for them to do 
their job effectively last year. It didn't help that 
the Housing administrators made several impor- 
tant decisions without first consulting the coun- 
cil 

The Undergraduate Students Association 
Council and the Graduate Student Association - 
which serve as the student government and the 
official voice of the student body - have attempt- 
ed to help remedy the situation by making pro- 
posals to the Housing office, but without student 
participation their continuing efforts will be in 
vain. 

USAC has pledged to solicit more studoit 
input this year since many complain the council 
tackles issues most students don't feel stixxigly 
about Holding the administration, ASUCLA and 
Housing accountable means students must 
demand an exhaustive amount of advocacy fix>m 
their student government on the issues directly 
affecting them at UCLA. 

lY)e Viewpoint section of the Daily Bruin is 
meant specifically to allow you this (^)portunity. 
It is a public forum for debate betwe«i opposing 
parties, but most of all, a forum for you, the 
reader, to voice your concerns about every 
aspect of university, including Tlie Bruin itself. 
The Bruin will do its part by keeping students 
informed of how they will be affected by 
changes the university proposes. 

Though student interests were largely ignored 
last year, iiKX>ming classes should view this, not 
as a grim ouUook for the upconung year, but as a 
sign that opportunities for students to get 
involved in the university abound. No one 
should sit idly by and let agencies designed to 
work for them run roughshod all over their best 
Hterests, e^)ecially since students have the 
P<^ential to foment change that wiU turn last 
y63% txends around in order to make them 
more^tudent-fiiendly. Students can do this, not 
only by writing to The Bruin, but also by voicing 
their coicems during their student government's 
public meMings, and by participating in rallies 
and protests sponsored by campus student advo- 
cacy groi^js. Don't ignore invitations to these 
events, becau^ they're often the only chances 
youTl get to speak out about changes that will 
directly affect you. 

Incoming classes have myriad opportunities 
to make a difference this year - they must 
embrace them if they are to prevent a sequel to 
last year's embarrassment 



VIEWPOINT E-MAIL^aa MAIL 



eDaiyBnii 
iKedkhofff 



nSKerckhoffHal 

306 Wisstwood Plaza 

Los Angeles. CA 90024-1641 



Wie reserve the n^ to e(Jit leners for length 
and dantyVtiu must indude your name maiiig 
address and tetephone number. Anonymous 
tetters wtt)e accepted tjut not puMShed 



Yoke of herd mentality must be kicked off 



UCLA is a ranch. 
It is nothing more than a large 
commercialized 
estate that pulls 
together well-bred 
children from high 
schools all over 
California (and else- 
where) and places 
them in an environ- 
ment that only facili- 
tates more similarity 
and banality. Students 
who attend this uni- 
versity have been 
bred to perform, bred 
throughout their high 
school careers to 
measure up to certain 
standards and attain certain grades and 
numbers on meaningless tests. 

When they actually arrive at this won- 
derful university, students seem to 
expect nothing more from their college 




Michelle 
Singer 

mstiesf^imBrtRirtaedu 



careers than they did out of their high 
school ones. Their goals remain in the 
superficial realm of grades and tests - 
they do not focus on learning for the 
sake of being well-rounded knowledge- 
able people, but for the sake of making 
the grade. 

This is partially because UCLA is 
structured in such a way that its main 
goal is to usher its students through 
their "education" as quickly as possible 
in order to accept more students and 
make more money. 

Take, for example, the new minimum 
progress requirement, which forces stu- 
dents to complete at least 27 units every 
two quarters. This places constraints on 
peoples' lives and molds them into work 
horses (or cattle as the situation may 
be), racing through their time here, 
unable to pursue outside individual 
interests or hold jobs because they must 
devote so much time to studying. It is 
about the ends and not the means; it is 



about getting into graduate, law or med- 
ical school instead of being about expe- 
riencing all college has to offer. 

As is plainly visible by this policy and 
others like it, UCLA is a research-first, 
education-second university. You will be 
more readily identified by your student 
identification number than your name, 
professors are often as apathetic as stu- 
dents, and administrators are more con- 
cerned with sniffing out contributions 
than attending to students' quality of life. 

How can individuality, somethiig 
UCLA prides itself on, thrive in such an 
environment? Of course there are people 
who are recognized more than others 
(such as recent Undergraduate Student 
Association Council members), but most 
of those people are singled out because 
they are leaders of the herd, not because 
they are true individuals. 

In the face of such oppression, stu- 
dents eventually break down and con- 
form to the catUe persona But in 



embracing this image, students' minds 
are slaughtered because they are not in 
the mindset to break free. They don't 
even realize they're just following the 
herd because their minds become limp 
from disuse and misuse. 

There is hope yet. UCLA can change, 
and the student body can change too. All 
individuality has not been lost -just the 
observable type whose presence is badly 
needed if others are to understand it is 
acceptable, even wonderful, to walk 
their own path in life. It is okay to not 
drink that last beer despite "friends'" 
provocations; it is all right not to go to 
medical school despite parental insis- 
tence to the contrary; it is okay to 
explore options and devote time to a job 
that might have a lot of real-life applica- 
tion. College is not about parties, clothes 
and getting A's - it is about finding your- 
self in whatever way you see fit. And 
UCLA's herd mentality should not be 
allowed to change that. 




Orientation 



yp:ar I 



YPAR 2 



Orientation o 

Scavenger hunts, campus tours and 
flocks of wide-eyed high school grad- 
uates can only mean one thing: it's 
orientation season. A time when pre-fi-esh- 
man from across the country, not yet 
jaded by the rigors of 
college, head toward 
UCLA for a three-day 
power-session filled 
with tidbits of advice 
and words of wisdom 
about campus living. 
But for all its good 
intentions, the orienta- 
tion program tirnis out 
to be, at best, a luke- 
warm experience. 

While there is cer- 
tainly a need to accli- 
mate students on the 

eve of their college 

experience, the UCLA Orientation pro- 
gram unfortunately doubles as a giant 
day-care center. 

Students expecting their first tastes 
of freedom and personal responsibility 
are sorely mistaken. As it turns out, lit- 
tle time is provided for individual explo- 



YPAR 3 



^^'^'^ * GRADUATION 



JASON LIU/Daily Bruin Staff 




Ian Eisner 

iBisner^)mBdia.ucia^du 



ration or interaction. Instead, students 
are forced to remain in small hand-hold- 
ing groups most of the time. It is strik- 
ingly un-college-like, especially for a 
program designed to familiarize stu- 
dents with the characteristically inde- 
pendent college experience. Orientation 
rounselo*Tiave been' heard to utter the 
phrases "UCLA is boittdless" and 
"Please cjpn't stray frogi the group" in 
the same sentence. 

This might be forgivable if the orien- 
tation process were replete with useful 
facts and unique insight. Unfortunately, 
there is litUe covered that students 
haven't heard before or couldn't figure 
out by flipping through a student guide. 
But at least the disseminators of this 
information are well informed and gen- 
erally able to answer most student ques- 
tions. In what amounts to a three-day 
question and answer period, students 
are given ample time to work out any 
concerns or misgivings. 

Not content to just tackle academic- 
related inquiries, though, the UCLA 
Orientation program somehow finds the 
need to inculcate students about issues 



hints vaguely at college life 



not central to the academic experience. 
Much to the students' dismay, they are 
forced to spend a good portion of their 
orientation experience cramped up in a 
lecture hall, learning about sex, drugs 
and tolerance. 

These are, as stated in the orientation 
manifesto, exercises in "personal devel- 
opment through workshops and presen- 
tations." Nevermind that students have 
sat through these kinds of lectures 
countiess times before. The real puzzler 
is why Orientation finds it necessary to 
invest time in character development at 
all. Spreading the virtues of tolerance, 
while admirable, certainly falls outside 
orientation's scope of purpose. 

The students themselves even note 
the absurdity of "personal development" 
training, as evidenced by their laughter 
throughout the workshops. And who 
can blame them? After all, watching a 
bunch of fourth-year students "play 
drunk" while acting out a moronic 
drinking game can be quite amusing. 
The message, of course, is to "drink 
responsibly." But who hasn't already 
heard this message countiess times 



before, in what was likely a more credi- 
ble context? The university's sermon 
would be better served by simply hand- 
ing out pamphlets that urge safe-sex, 
responsible drinking and tolerance. 

Fortunately, not every aspect of ori- 
entation is as miscast as "personal 
development" training. For instance, 
orientation affords incoming students a 
taste of college life by allowing them to 
spend a couple nights in the dorms with 
fellow future-bruins. 

This experience can help allay anxi- 
eties that come along with the transi- 
tion to college. To a certain degree, ori- 
entation serves its function in slightiy 
demystifying the campus and college 
life in general. 

Whether or not this experience 
makes up for the shortcomings of orien- 
tation is another question. The answer 
really depends on personal preference. 
Unfortunately, under the status quo, stu- 
dents have littie choice in the matter. So 
like in years past, throngs of future-bnh 
ins will arrive at college orientation, 
only to leave with a vague idea of what 
college is really about. 



Choosing classes, planning schedule 
doesn't have to be painful, arduous 




David Burke 

dbu1e@medb.ucia.edu 



Every college student under- 
stands choosing classes is an 
important but potentially 

intimidating and fiiistrating process. 

Fortunately, it doesn't have to be 

that way. There are ways to choose 

your classes 

wisely and 

ensure your 

quarter is inter- 
esting and 

enlightening 

instead of boring 

and arduous. 
TVo obvious 

reasons to take 

a class - the 

ones focused on 

at Orientation - 

are to begin 

working on the 

coursework for 

your mzuor or to fulfill some of 
your general education require- 
ments. But those aren't the only 
reasons to take classes. 

Most students at UCLA will have 
plenty of free space during the 
course of their college career to 
take classes that don't fulfill any 
requirements and still graduate on 
time. One good reason to take a 
class is to explore other subjects 
outside your m;\ior to see how 
much you eryoy them. This 
ensures that you will choose a 
mayor you will genuinely ei\joy, 
which is vital to a good college 
experience. You don't want to be in 
your second or third year at UCLA 
when you realize you're unhappy 
with your mjyor. You need to get a 
feel for your msyor and a couple 
other areas that you might be inter- 
ested in when you are a freshman. 

While it's nice to get your GEs 
out of the way early, you do not 
have to feel a sense of urgency: 



you have four years to complete 

them. Instead of rushing to fulfdl 
your GE requirements, you might 
be better off taking a class that you 
think sounds interesting or fun. 
Some of the most eiyoyable and 
rewarding classes I've taken during 
my fu^t three years at UCLA fit 
into this category. If you find a 
class that strikes your fancy, go 
ahead and enroll. 

Once you've come up with a Ust 
of between 10 and 15 classes that 
you are interested in taking, you 
should have some flexibility to 
decide the days and times you 
want to have class. A lot of stu- 
dents try to squeeze all of their 
classes into three or four days so 
they can have days off during the 
week or long weekends. However, 
I like to have class everyday 
because my schedule becomes 
more spread out and I'm doing 
something related to school each 
weekday. But if you'd really like a 
day or two off, try it and see if you 
can make it work. 

When choosing times for your 
classes, the most important thing is 
to choose a time when you will 
actually attend class. Don't enroll 
in an eight or nine o'clock class 
unless you are .willing to wake up 
for them and get enough sleep the 
night before. If you hve in the 
dorms, it is unrealistic to think you 
will go to bed before midnight or 
one o'clock every night. There are 
just too many distractions and fun 
things to do. So unless you are 
willing to attend class frequentiy 
on six or fewer hours of sleep, try 
to avoid early morning classes. 

If possible, it's a good idea to 
schedule your classes so you don't 
have a long break in between them. 
It would be ideal if you could 



schedule your classes one after 
another, with perhaps a one hour 
break during the day. It will give 
you a chance to grab a quick bite, 
finish up homework, or do some 
last minute studying. Your week- 
days will seem much shorter and 
you will have a lot more free time. 

But before you enroll in any 
class, you should visit 
bruinwalk.com and see what other 
students have said about the pro- 
fessor and the class. Most classes 
and professors have neither spec- 
tacular nor horrible reviews, but if 
reviews are particularly good or 
bad, it's a good idea to make a note 
of it TYy to avoid a professor or a 
class students rampanUy dislike 
and try to take a class with a pro- 
fessor they love. 

Don't use bruinwalk.com to find 
and take extremely easy courses, 
though. They may boost your GPA, 
but they are a waste of your time. 
You are here to learn, not to take 
meaningless courses. 

One final tip to help you gain an 
ideal class schedule is over- 
enrolling. Enroll in one more class 
than you plan to take and then 
drop the class you like the least 
before the deadline. It's a great 
way to ensure you will have one 
less bad class each quarter. For 
your first quarter, this means you 
should probably enroll in four 
classes and drop one once the 
quarter starts. Taking more than 
three classes your fust quarter is 
not advised — you'll have enough 
other things to adapt to as it is. 

Although it can seem intimidat- 
ing and frustrating, if you do it 
right, choosing classes can be pain- 
less and even pleasant. So relax, 
take your time, do some research, 
and have a great, quarter! 




en 




Attending UCLA gives 

students a rich sense 

of history, tradition, 

future fond memories 

By Brian Lowry 

Having graduated from UCLA in 1984, 1 now have 
the unique perspective of having lived as much of my 
life since that hot day in June as before moving my 
meager belongings into Rieber Hall four years earlier 
on an equally hot day in September. 

It seems strange, then, with so much time having 
passed, to realize that I and most of my college friends 
stiU tend to discuss our lives in the following terms: 
before college, college and after college. 
^ The significance of those four (or in the case of 
most of my contemporaries, five) years apply to pretty 
much every college experience, representing a time in 
life to be savored and eryoyed, despite the under- 
standable apprehension associated with bridging the 
gap between youth and adulthood. 

Attending UCLA, however, brings its own unique 
joys to college life, and its own rich history to the 
e3q>erience. 

Granted, there are no ivy-covered walls, but UCLA 
benefits from a breadth that provides every aspect of 
college that one can desire - providing the opportuni- 
ty to immerse oneself in school while still having 
access to all the benefits of a mayor metropohtan set- 
ting. 

LOWRY I Page 14 



Lowry, ourrerUly a reporter and columnist for the Los 
Angeles Times, graduated from UCLA in 1984 unth a 
bachelor's degree in communication studies. 



College isn't just about books Speaks Out 



VIEWPOINT 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 



1B 



{ By David Dahie 

StudtMit apathy is a dis- 
oa.se thai hius infected stu- 
dents at VClJi m the recent 
years Many studontij here 
are content with focusing 
solely on their academics 
and work niyopically 
towards their degree while 
the vibrant nature of campus 
life seems to deteriorate 
more every year. 

Students often complain 
that they do not know about 
the many programs or 
resources on campus 
because these services seem 
invisible. Student organiza- 
tions, meanwhile, face a 
perennial struggle with 
maintaining a high level of 
active membership. This 
past spring's undergraduate 
student government elec- 
tions recorded one of the 
lowest voter turnouts ever, 
which unfortunately contin- 
ued the recent trend of 
declining student interest 
and participation in events 
and decisions regarding 
campus hfe. 

UCL\ can be inaccessible, 
but it is our responsibility to 
find out about the different 
opportunities available to us 

Dahh\ a fifth-near studeyit, is 
thp 200 J- ^m.'i ( \SAr presidnU 



BSM 



id take advantage of them. 
The education you will 
receive here will be depen- 
dent on your wilhngness to 
enhance your own academic 
experience. WTiile UCLA is 
considered one of the most 
prestigious universities in 
the country and is lauded for 
its excellent academia, it is 
becoming more hke a degree 
factory than a learning envi- 
ronment due to the indiffer- 
ent attitudes of students and 
professors. 

Even students that want 
to be more active are finding 
it increasingly difficult due 
to new admmistrative poli- 
cies like the minimum 
progress requirement, which 
essentially forces students to 
take four classes every quar- 
ter. This push to herd stu- 
dents out of UCLA in four 
years, though, stifles student 
involvement and further con- 
tributes to the general 
malaise that seems to be tak- 
ing over. 

Despite the institutional 
changes and pohcy shifts, 
you shape your curriculum, 
you determine how to spend 
your time, and you can make 
your next years here what 
you think they should be. Do 
not waste the precious gift 
of a UCLA undergraduate 
experience. The choices you 



make in your first year will 
greatly determine how nuich 
you will ultimately gain from 
college. 

While there is nothing 
wrong with making grades 
your number one priority, 
take advantage of the huge 
number of opportunities that 
make college life more than 
just listening to lectures and 
reading books. In order to 
get the most out of your 
future here, I urge you to 
balance your academics with 
extracurricular activities, 
and take a holistic approach 
toward learning. 

If you are interested in 
student government, walk 
into Kerckhoff Hall and get 
involved in the 
Undergraduate Students 
Association Council. If you 
hke to write or are thinking 
about a career in journalism, 
join the Daily Bruin staff. If 
you want to gain leadership 
skills in the residence halls 
apply to be a resident assis- 
tant, program assistant, stu- 
dent leader, student health 
advocate, or resident com- 
puter assistant. Become a 
member of an organization - 
there are hundreds hsted on 
the student group directory, 
which you can access 

DAHLEI Page 15 



WHAT IS THE BIGGEST ISSUE CONFRONTING INCOMING STUDENTS? 




J^MA Hajibai, Fourth-year, MING Engineer 

"I came here 
as a transfer 
and the hardest 
thing to actjust 
to at first was 
overcrowding. 
If you come 
from a small 
area, like I did, 
everylhing 
seems so com- 
pact and dense here you need to 
know your way around. Before 
coming to the imiversity, definitely 
visit campus and get familiar with 
your surroundings." 

Victoria Rapoport, Secontf-year, Poitical Science 

"Freedom of 
speech can be a 
big issue, espe- 
cially when it is 
taken so far to 
the extreme it 
becomes dis- 
turbing and 
negative. High 
school was a 
very sheltered 
place 2md it is a shock to come on 
to campus and see a lot of nega- 
tivity. They won't be able to 
change all of it, but the freshmen 
ccHuing in should at least be 
ready for that." 





Deborah Liu, Fourth-year, Psychobiology 

"Attjusting to donn life 
Ls hard to do as a fresh- 
man jiLst l)ecause it's 
very different fi^om 
home. I was in a triple 
and the small Uving 
space LS hard to get u.s<'d 
to at first - there Isn't 
much room to move 
aroiuul or have your owii 
personal space. Having 
to cope with new roonunates and the people 
living aroiuid you is a challenge, too. Make 
sure you open the lines of conmiunication 
with yoiu- nxmmiates and other people on 
yoiu- floor, it's always helpful to be .social." 

ViNAY Swa mnathan, Second-year, Electricaj engineering 

"Taking enough units 
and getting the classes 
you want under the new 
Minimum Progress 
Requirement regulations 
can be challenging, 
especially if you don't - 
have priority enroll- 
ment. Freshmen need to 
take enrollment more 
seriously, plan ahead, 
and take necessary classes as soon as they 
can, because it's going to lead to trouble if 
they don't. Minimum Progress is a good 
thing to keep students on track, but people 
shoiUdn't necessarily be kicked out for not 
meeting tlie requirements." 





Sarah Farzan, Class of 2002 

"Tlie biggest prob- 
lem is actually that 
tliere Is a lot of red 
tape in getting what 
you want done. The 
university is really 
good at making you 
feel like a number and 
not a valuable part of 
the university. As a 
freshman, you should 
tiy to nuike use of all the resources avail- 
able. Amazing professors, coimselors and 
programs are available if you take the 
time to seek them out. Get involved in 
the system and use it to your advantage." 

Brendan RAHER,4i|a8s of 2002 

"The biggest issue 
facing next year's 
fi-eshmen is finding a 
place to play intra- 
mural sports. I was on 
a Softball team, and it 
was hard to find 
places to play, espe- 
cially with the closing 
of the IM field. You 
can play other places 
around and off campus, but it's such a 
nuissance. A lot of freshmen coming in 
are very active and they want to contin- 
ue their sports careers even if it is not at 
the collegiate level, but they won't have 
anywhere to do so." 




Speaks Out compiled by Kelsey Hicks, Daily Bniin Senior SUiff. Photos by Chns Barkley, Daily Bmin. 



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LOWRY I Grad remembers Bruin college life 



from page "B 

And while UCLA is a relatively 
young campus, the school offers its 
own proud kUitory, with virtually 
something for everyone. 
Accomplishments range from the 
schools of medicine and engineer- 
ing to a pioneering contribution to 
the Internet to the numerous film- 
makers, including Francis Ford 
Coppola, who cut their teeth here. 

Personally, having grown up 
with a parent and older siblings 
who attended UCLA before me, I 
take the most glee from the 11 ' 
national basketball championship 
banners dangling from the rafters 
of Pauley Pavilion, as well as the 
storied list of athletes who 
excelled in other sports, among 
them Olympian Rafer Johnson and 
multi-sport star Jackie Robinson, 



who broke baseball's color barrier. 

My own years at UCLA remain a 
blur of activities and events. The 
most vivid range from football 
games at the Rose Bowl (including 
a couple of trips to the Rose Bowl 
itself) to sleeping outside Pauley to 
ensure choice seats for key basket- 
ball games to late nights in the 
offices of the Daily Bruin, where I 
served as entertainment editor and, 
thanks to movie screenings, 
financed most of my social life dur- 
ing those years. 

Perhaps what's most telling in 
hindsiglit is the imprint that attend- 
ing UCLA left upon me, even if it 
wasn't always readily apparent at 
the time. Obscure issues I studied 
frequently come to mind in my role 
as a journalist, making me appreci- 
ate the concept of a general liberal 
arts education more now than I did 



back then. 

Moreover, the skills I honed, 
simply in terms of problem solving 
and being able to tailor solutions to 
different classes and situations, 
have served me in unexpected 
ways throughout my career. 

My fondest memories, however, 
have little to do with such practical 
considerations. Many of them 
involve screaming crowds or 
groups of friends, but some are as 
simple as strolling from the dorms 
down to the library (which I admit 
to visiting once or twice) on a 
balmy spring night. 

In short, having been away from 
it as long as most of you have been 
alive, all I can really hope to con- 
vey is a sense of envy that I can't 
line up in those crowded registrar 
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VIEWPOINT 



^MENTATION ISSUE 2002 • THE DAILY MUIN 15 



Long-distance love requires work trust 




Keely 
Hedges 

WiBdBBS@nrwfiairia.edu 



Be warned, Bruins: now that 
you've made one of the 
biggest decisions of your life - 
if and where to go to school -you 
are faced with an even more gut- 
wrenching decision. And no, I'm not 
talking about 
your fall quarter 
, schedule or 
what UCLA 
|par2^)hemalia 
you should pur- 
chase. Rather, 
I'm talking about 
what to do 
about that high 
school sweet- 
heart you love 
and adore. Is it 
time to call it 
quits, or are you 
ready to seal the 
deal on long-dis- 
tance love? 

Both decisions come with a 
long list of pros and cons, and nei- 
ther decision is an easy one. 
jLuckily, I am the self-proclaimed 
dating and relationship guru, and 
have utter confidence that I can 
help you in solving this particular- 
ly common, but inevitably impos- 
sible, dilemma. The two questions 
one must posit before even think- 
ing about making this decision 
are: Do you love your 
girl/boyfriend? and How much do 
you love your girl/boyfriend? 

This is an especially tricky thing 
to come to terms with because 
many would argue that at our age 
we don't know what true love is 
and often confuse love with infat- 
uation. However, I would say that 
the majority of college fi^eshmen 
are mature enough to assess the 



status of their relationship in 
regard to the difficult concept of 
love. If you can already answer 
the first question negatively, you 
are well on your way to brealdng 
it off. 

The second question involves 
how willing you are to make your 
relationship work even if you're 
located hundreds or thousands of 
miles away from your lover. This 
basically boils down to two con- 
cepts: trust and loyalty. You must 
be able not only to trust your 
girl/boyfriend, but also to exercise 
the same loyalty to them. College, 
replete with sin and temptation, is 
perhaps the most treacherous, evil 
place when it comes to possible 
interactions with the opposite gen- 
der. 

However, if you love your 
girl/boyfiiend enough to want to 
avoid sexual persuasion from the 
opposite sex, sticking together 
could be right up your alley. Long- 
distance romance will only work if 
both partners envision a mutual 
future spent together. The same 
amount of love, devotion and 
patience must be exercised if both 
of you are to remain happy with 
the type of relationship you will 
be forced to endure. 

Knowing that the telephone and 
the Internet will be preferred 
methods of communication for a 
very long time also has to suffice 
for the both of you. You and your 
girl/boyfriend must also remember 
that the wonderful, blissful sex 
that you worked so hard to perfect 
will have to be abandoned in the 
face of physical distance. 

On the flip side, I would reserve 
breaking up for those people who 



just want to be single. It's one 
thing to be unhappy because you 
can't physically spend time with 
your girl/boyfriend, but it's an . 
entirely different thing if you're 
unhappy because you can't spend 
time with anyone else. If you even 
think that you may want to 
kiss/touch/go out with someone 
else while in college, you better 
break it off before you become 
that unfaithful, cheating ex. For 
many, college is a world yet to be 
explored, and doing so solo can be 
an experience of a lifetime. If you 
know that doing the long-distance 
thing will be wrought with jeal- 
ousy, envy and frustration, 
become newly single and eryoy 
the luxury of singledom at UCLA. 

The hardest thing to gauge 
about your first-year at college is 
what you want insofar as relation- 
ships go. Having a girl/boyfriend 
from home could be comforting 
and reliable, but it could also 
place unwanted restrictions on 
your social life. On the other hand, 
while being single could yield vast 
amounts of attention from the 
opposite sex, it may also risk the 
loss of the prior love of your life. 

Knowing what you should do is 
never easy, but luckily this deci- 
sion is based solely on you and 
what you're willing and capable of 
doing. Saying "goodbye" to your 
girl/boyfriend doesn't have to be 
forever, and having a 
girl/boyfriend doesn't mean you're 
kissing your social life goodbye. 
Both decisions have the capacity 
to be both promising and futile, so 
take the time to weigh your 
options and hopefully you will do 
the right thing. 



UCLA 



from page tt 

through the MyUCLA Web site. If 
you do not see one that interests 
you, go to the Center for Student 
Programming and start your own. 
Begin making contacts with alum- 
ni through the Student Alumni 
Association. Go to UCLA sporting 
events. For those interested in 
outreach and community service, 
there are numerous groups that 
can always accommodate dedicat- 
ed people. If Greek life interests 
yt>u, attend some rush events. Do 
not neglect your health while you . 
are here. Exercise regularly and 



try some of the fitness classes or 
intramural sports at the Wooden 
Center. Wear sunscreen. 

Do not let apathy get a hold of 
you. Take the time to care about 
issues that will affect your life. 
Watch the news and read a news- 
paper, because UCLA will seem 
like a bubble if you do not keep up 
on current events. Take the fliers 
that people will try to give you on 
Bruin Walk. It may seem annoying 
but you might learn about some- 
thing that can change your life. 
Listen to the guest speakers, pro- 
teiiters and activists on campuiiii. 
True education comes from 



exploring diverse perspectives. 

Your UCLA experience will be 
what you make of it. My time here 
has shown me that students who 
are more involved tend to do bet- 
ter in their classes, broaden their 
social network, gain invaluable 
leadership skills, and most of the 
time have more fun than students 
who are inactive. 

Many people will tell you to 
take the first year easy and slowly 
transition into college life, but the 
longer you wait to find your niche, 
the shorter amount of time you 
will have to ei^oy it. Haive a gscat 
year. 



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18 



m DAILY BRUIN -ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



ARTScSENTERTAINMENT 



Burnett remembers humble begimungs Aspiring artist ready for center stage 



By Amber Noizumi 

I DAILY BRUIN SENIOR ST/VFF , 

I anoizumi@medJa.ucla.edu • 

Carol Bumea has reigned as an American queen of 
comedy for over two generations. She certainly wasnt 
bom with a crown on her head or a scepter in her hand, 
but she has emerged to show that a peasant can become 
royalty, even in the brutal kuigdoni of show business. 
I With six Emmys, five Golden Globes, numerous 
People's Choice Awards and an electric sense of humor 
that could power a small country, Burnett has kept 
America laughmg. Her reunion special that air^ last fall 
topped the ratings with a blowout audience of 30 million. 

Some may best remember her from the CBS hit "The 
Carol Burnett Show" which earned a remarkable 22 
Enunys during its 11-year run. Or perhaps others recall 
little Orphan Annie's oppressor Miss Hannigan, or even 
more recently, Helen Hunt's neurotic mother on "Mad 
About You" (for which Burnett won an Emmy). But, do 
they know that her journey to success began at UCLA? 

Burnett was very poor growing up in Hollywood, and 
was raised mainly by her grandmother, the person to 
whom she still dedicates her trademark ear-tugs. EVen 
though tuition in 1950 was $42 a semester, finding a way 
to pay for l^CLA was no easy task for Burnett 

"We didn't have the money for the tuition for me to go. 
We were on welfare growing up," Burnett said "Some 
money appeared out of the blue. Someone had given me 
the tuition." 

But for Burnett this type of luck and human kindness 
was jtist a precursor for later generosity, and the begin- 
ning of her own humanitarian acts. Even though she got 
the first payment covered, she still had to work for the 
.rest 

"While in college, I worked at a movie theater on 
Hollywood Boulevard part-time in the box oflBce," she 
said "I was paid 75 cents an hour, I saved it all up and after 
a while, $42 accumulated for my tuition." 

Burnett didn't always know that she wanted to be an 
actor - she had no theater background going into college, 
though her grandmother did take her to the movies and 
often sang at home with her. 

Having been editor of both her junior hi^ and high 
school newspapers, Burnett began college with dreams of 
being a journalist After she got to UCLA, she briefly 




Theii 



Former aruin Carol Burnett holds a photo from the collection 
she donated to the UCLA Film and Television Archives. 

joined the Daily Bruin staff, but soon shifted her focus to 
a nuyor tliat was of interest to her Theater Arts English, 
which provided 
her first acting 
experience. 

"I remember I 
was in the acting 
class. I was scared 
to death. I went up 

and did a monologue. It didnt even occur to me to 
read the play to know what the heck this person was. 
It just wasn't in my background," Burnett said. "She 
(the teacher) gave me a D-minus and the only reason 
I didn't get an F was because I had memorized it" 

But the fledgling thespian didnY let that stop her. The 
next time she had to do a scene, it was a musical duet 
from Noel Coward's "Red Peppers." Tliis time she tried 
employing some of what she learned watching movies 
with her grandmother. 

"I just pretended to be Betty Grable with an English 
accent and we got an A." Burnett said "We got some 
laughs and that had never happened with me. All of a sud- 

BURNETT I Page 20 



By Amber NoizumI 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
anoizumi@media.ucla.edu 

Just looking at the &-foot-5-inch, 
fair-skinned blond, you might expect 
her to sing in soft-spoken chirps. But 
the powerful, cri^ notes that thun- 
der from this delicate actor quickly 
di^>el that notion. 

Anne Warren, a third-year musi- 
cal theater student, is a woman with 
a big voice and big dreams to match. 

"My dream is to play Belle in 
'Beauty and the Beast' - that's my 
corny one," Warren said. "I also 
want to be Eponine in 'Les 
Miserables.' 

But for Warren, those dreams are 
not so far out of reach. Just in April, 
she auditioned for the touring pro- 
ductions of both "Footloose" and 
"Les Miserables." Tliough she didn't 
get cast, she is getting her 
name out there. 




zo 



"I just need to get my 
foot in the door - v^d\ 
is hard," Warren said 
For Warren, those big 
dreams started out when she was in 
her junior high school choir and 
they performed Andrew Lloyd 
Webber's "Joseph and the Amazing 
Technicolor Dreamcoat" 

"After my first musical, I was 
addicted," she said 

But Warren's family constantly 
moved around to Washington, 
Minnesota, Idaho and Northern 
California before finally settling 



down in Goto de Gaza, Calif., where 
Warren first got her lead role as 
Martha in Capistrano Valley High 
School's production of "TTie Secret 
Garden." 

"It was so fiin and exciting to 
finally get a lead role," Warren said. 
"And it was vindicating because I 
had waited so long and I knew I 
could do it Playing Martha just 
made me want to do more." 

While many parents dread the 
thought of their children trying to 
break into show business, Warren's 
parents have stayed behind her. 

But Warren's parents are not the 
only ones who recognize her talent 
Recently, she won the Carol Burnett 
Award, which is a $1,OOG scholarship 
given to the winner of a musical the- 
ater competition. 

"I was so shocked when I won. I 
really didn't think I won. My friends' 
scenes were amazing and I thought 
that one of them had won for sure," 
Warren said 

Though not everyone can win the 
con^)etition, Warren feels that these 
type of theatrical experiences at 
UCLA help shape students into bet- 
ter performCTS. 

"I watched everybody grow a lot 
during the competition," Warren 
said "I know I learned so much 
about myself having to put the scene 
together pretty much on my own." 

The competition also introduced 
her to big names such as Dean 
Pitchford, who wrote the lyrics for 
"Fame" and "Footloose," as well as 
renowned choreographer Lee 
Martino. 

"It was so cool getting to perform 
for Dean Pitchford because I had 
just auditioned for 'Footloose,'" 
Warren said 




Piirrro cxxnmsY of^ne Warren 

Third-year Anne Warren is le recent 
winner of the Carol Burnett ^vard. 

Warren also got to meet\ie co- 
writer of "Company," Georg«\jith, 
when she played Amy in UCL^ pro. 
duction of the musical 

In addition to making collec- 
tions, Warren, who has mv^d 
around all of her life, has four ^ 
comfortable niche at UCLA. 

"The other students are like v 
family. We have all of our class« 
together, we practically live togetl 
er," she said. 

The professors are really, really 
wonderful too. They're really 
encouraging and obviously think we 
have what it takes to make it UCLA 
is a very nurturing, encouraging, 
really positive place to be." 

This summer Warren will be bid- 
ing her time trying to make a name 
for herself in film, television and 

WARREN I Page 20 



homespan 

Many Bruins trade in their tom-toms for turntables as 
spinning grows more popular among the college crowd 




EDWARD LIN/Daii.y Bkmn Senu* Stkfv 

Fourth-year political science student Steve Larkin, also known as DJ Whizard, and his turntable may be moving into a 
Westwood residence near you. 



By Alex Palmer 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
apalmer@media.ucla.edu 

Natalie Gilliam, a third-year psy- 
chology student, is new to being a 
DJ. Practicing since last August, 
she's spun at a couple apartment 
parties and performed once at a 
bar, but mostly she just plays 
around on her ftiends' and sorority 
sisters* turntables. 

"I've almost got my own set of 
equipment, everything but the sec- 
ond turntable," Gilliam said. 

She's not alone. "Spinning"- the 
technique of playing two records 
simultaneously and matching up 

th«' l)«>at st'tjufiuos ht'twt'fii t\\v 

Two to create a sound richer than 
the sum of its parts - is quickly 
becoming one of the most popular 
pastimes - or art forms, depending 
on who's asked - at UCLA. 
Students from all comers of cam- 
pus are testing their skills on the 
ones and twos. 

While a live band used to be the 
best way to get a party bumping, 
now it's a live DJ who's moving the 
crowd. Walking through the dorm 
halls, it's just as possible to hear 
people spinning the new Aphex 
Twin album on their turntables as 
it is to hear people strumming a 
Dave Matthews song on their gui- 
tar. 

Underground electronic music, 
which used to exist under the radar 
of popular culture, is coming to the 
surface and spreading its mighty 
tentacles, grabbing up a wide range 
of music fiends from computer 
geeks to hip-hop heads. 

DJ Whizard, better known as 
fourth-year political science stu- 
dent Stephen Larkin, hosts the live 
drum 'n' bass show "Magnetik 
Spacelab" on UCLARadio.com. He 
was struck by the power of spin- 
ning when he went to a rave during 
his high school years. 

"1 looked up at the DJ, and he 
seemed sort of mystical," Larkin 
said. "It was legendary. I wanted to 
be part of it." 



After acquiring a decent set of 
second-hand equipment and a 
respectable collection of records, 
Larkin began honing his skills as 
DJ Whizard. 

Larkin has since moved on not 
only to host "Magnetik Spacelab," 
but also to have a brief residency 
at a Hollywood club and to spin at 
bars, nightclubs and the occasional 
rave. 

Fourth-year English student Wes 
Medina, the DJ behind the 
UCLARadio show "The Mess" 
("rhymes with Wes," says Medina), 
spins for less social purposes. 

"I really experience my music at 
home," Medina said. "I like how 

D./ing ( ;ui f itluuu <■ fh<- «-.\jM'rit'fi<<- 
of listening, I'm not rt'iUly a party 
performer." ■ 

Rather than the incessant and 
danceable beats of the drum 'n' 
bass that Larkin performs, Medina 
spins IDM (intelligent dance 
music), a mellower strain of elec- 
tronic music meant to be eryoyed 
as much in living room chairs as on 
dance floors. 

The sheer variety in styles and 
genres of spirming is a key factor in 
its popularity with students. 
Virtually any music fan can find 
something to like about spinning. 

But according to Victor Carrillo, 
an 11 -year electronic music veter- 
an and manager of Higher Source, 
the West Los Angeles DJ gear and 
record store, the expanding popu- 
larity of spirming has led to sepa- 
ratism in the DJ community. 

"When I first canye to L.A. (in 
1991), you would hear jungle, 
house, breaking, all in one venue," 
Carrillo said, "Now it's broken 
down by genre and subgenre, 
there's a lot of crews that stick to 
just their specific style, and it's 
choking the scene." 

Carrillo described watching 
electronic music move from an 
underground trend to a substantial 
force in the music industry, includ- 
ing the rise and current waning 
popularity of raves. But with the 
commercial popularity of electron- 



ic music there has also been a rise 
in the media's need to label and 
subdivide the myriad styles within 
spirming. 

Larkin sees the separatism 
between spinning styles as a prob- 
lem, too, but explains that his 
exclusive focus on drum 'n' bass 
music is more for financial reasons 
than any other. 

"I started out with the intention 
of doing a bunch of different styles, 
but I realized I could really only 
afford one," Larkin said. 

Money is definitely a concern for 
aspiring student DJs, with the 
upward of $1000 that some DJs pay 
for quality equipment, not to men- 

titni tin- ticccl Lo coiisliuitly cxpiuid 
their record coiiection. 

But Medina is quick to point out 
that with a few hundred dollars it's 
not hard to find a decent pair of 
turntables, though they may not be 
Technics 1200 brand - the industry 
standard for spirming. It's just a 
matter of shopping around. 

Besides money, the other main 
challenge for would-be DJs is not 
learning how to spin as much as 
sticking to it. 

"Especially in the last couple 
years, I see people come into the 
store for about three months, then 
they just stop coming," Carrillo 
said. "As long as you don't give up, 
you can pick up spinning. Anyone 
can catch on eventually." 

Many students have discovered 
this already. 

"I came in with no previous 
musical experience, and I had no 
problem picking up spinning with- 
in a year," Larkin said. "You just 
have to eryoy what you're doing, 
and it's easy." 

Carrillo couldn't agree more. 
"If you go in with your gut in this 
stuff, it's easy," Carrillo said, "If 
you love music, you're a musician, 
it's as simple as that." 

And apparently more and more 
"musicians" are popping up in 
dorm rooms, firatemity and sorori- 
ty houses and Westwood apart- 
ments every year. 



Coppola values amateur art, modem technology UCLA filmmaker pursues personal indie flicks 

»*. . I 1 ^ 11... •.ti:i._ ii _». ...I :*.« A. * __••.! I I r». .ii iti- i_ ^u~:_ : j ^i I 1 



By Howard Ho 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 

hho@media.ucla.edu 

FYands Ford Coppola needs no cliched introduction 
about how he's the godfather of modem filnimaking. But 
leas well known is his affiliation with UCLA, where he 
graduated with a master's in filmmaking. 

That's right, the director of "The Godfather," 
"Apocalypse Now," aiKl "Bram Stoker's Dracula" was a 
Bruin and helped to create UCLAs reputation for experi- 
mental, avant-garde films. The marriage of academia and 
art was somewhat whimsical for Cc^pola, who originally 
wanted to study theater at Yale. 

"A haphazard opportunity to see Tfen Days That Shook 
the Worid' chang€Ki that (For me) the cart that was the- 
ater broke, and the driver fell into cinema. I changed my 
mind and went to the UCLA film school instead," Coppola 
sakl in an e-mail interview. 

According to Michael Schumacher's biography, 
Coppola's older brother had already gone to UCLA when 
young, and Coppola decided to do the same. It was 1960, 
a time when CUm schools were beginning to become 
strongholds of future talent. George Lucas, Robert 
Zemeclds, Martin Scorsese and Brian De Palma all 
matured through universities. 

Coppola's UCLA stint included several student films, 
such as "The Two Christophers" and "Aymonn the 
Tfefrible." Discontented with merely taking classes and 
talking about film theory, Coppola was intent on making 
as many films as possible and using LICLA to get a pro- 
duction crew for his directorial projects. 

lb this day, Coppola maintains a proactive stance 
toward filmmaking. Hoping to fi-ee filmmaking firom the 
big studios, Coppola founded production company 
American Zoetrope for independent voices. 



"1 like art best when it's an amateur form, as in the past 
when doctors were composers, and stock brokers poets. I 
love that William Carlos Williams wrote his poetry on the 
back of prescription pads. I like that it's done for 
love and not for money," Coppola said. 

Important to Coppola's personal and filmmak '■% 
ing evolu- ' ||^ 

tion was 

when he met 
Roger 
Gorman, the 
B - m o V i e 

COPPOU I Page 20 




By Howard Ho 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
hho@medla.ucla.edu 

It may sound cheesy, but 
great filmmaking is Eli 
Kaufman's nuddle name. No, 




zv 




Photo (xxutesy of TALBtarr CoMMirNrxnoNS 

Before his critical and financial success with films such as "The 
Godfather and "Patten," Coppola studied filmmaking at UCLA. 



really, his middle name, Akira, 
comes fi-om his father's love of the 
films of the great Japanese director 
Akira Kurosawa. Upon asking 
Kaufman about his favorite film- 
makers, Kurosawa ("Seven 
Samurai," "Ran'"^ is an obvious 
choice. 

"What Kurosawa does is he 
makes his audience work to under- 
stand the picture," said Kaufman. 
"It's not formulaic, where you 
know when the bad guy will come 
in. He describes his characters in 
subtle ways." 

A second-year film directing 
master's student, Kaufinan recently 
took off a few months fi^om UCLA 
to intern with the directors Mark 
and Michael Polish on their new 
filfn "Northfolk" in Montana. The 
Polish brothers are gods among 
independent filmmakers, having 



made their previous two films 
("Twin Falls Idaho" and "Jackpot") 
with shoestring budgets and gar- 
nered rave reviews. 

Through a program called 
Project Involve (sponsored by 
Independent Feature Project 
West), Kaufinan became an assis- 
tant director to the Polish twins. 

To add to the dream-come-true 
internship, Kaufinan may even get 
his on-screen debut in the film 
opposite Nick Nolte. 

"I thought they were kidding 
with me when they said I should be 
in it The last time 1 had acted was 
in the sixth grade. The scene could 
be on the cutting room floor, but 
they put me in a scene with Nick 
Nolte and I have a couple of lines 
with him," Kaufman said. 

Kaufman considers himself an 
independent filmmaker interested 
in stories that are personal. For 
example, his newest film, "Haiku," 
centers around his interpretation 
of a 17th-century Japanese haiku 
and features only four words of 
dialogue in addition to the haiku. 

These types of experimental, 
non-linear ideas of filnmiaking are 
encouraged at the UCLA School of 
Film and Television which is 
known for being an avant-garde 
institution. 

"There's a real effort here at 




TX) (.rdTTTESY OF Maiiry Duchamp 

Second-year M.F.A. student Eli Kaufhwi 
acts with Nick Nolte in "Northfolk.' 

UCLA to create an environment 
that encourages filmmakers to 
push the envelope, to try to find the 
independent voice and create nar- 
ratives that may not be easy to 
watch but represent something 
personal for the filmmaker," 
Kaufinan said. 

As his use of a haiku and his love 
of Kurosawa might suggest, the 
half-Japanese Kaufinan's perscmal 
side centers largely around the 
Js^anese culture in which he grew 
up. Being Asian, he would like to 
break out of the stereotypical roles 
male Asian characters are often 
confined to play in the movie 

KAUFMAN I Page 21 



-^-^- 



ARTS£ENTEHTAINMENT 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 



19 



Movies that filmed at UCLA 



TbM ar8>at t f^ or tt» firm that \Mr« r«o«i(ty shot It U(U ind I itto ab^ 

Scrjafn2 

Cou^n^f CoK runs out of KkMy (W and 
uMmEnwrgnicyphont.lt 
the end of the ftn. Cor and 
Meye Campbel are In fhmt of 




wkjtt oftfit Shoots ttk8 fiboB In sunwntr or 
urinttrbntL Ih htvtnt hid i protkm witti f 
An shoot dot to nmMii. "-Kmw Hoh, Studtnt 
UnkmDMiionlimi^ of UCIA Emits 



Life plan undesirable, go for chaotic gob 




KarckhorriMwhIeDivM 
ArquettB li tilein to Br^n 
Waft on a stretEher. 
Length: three 



Ugally Blonde 

jMe Wthenpoon criee In fhnt 



i^ 



Nutty Professor 



I the Feculy Oanter and gets orient- 
ed to llarMrd on the Kerckhoff 
bMm and ooflMhouM petts. 
Ua^tarmlnutBS 



Hanater run around tMtMen Powel and Moors. 
Edde Murphy runs 14) Janss Steps Rocky-style, 
mIb on Bruin Irik, and even creahee Ms sports 
car In Wutwood. 
Length: ilxxit 15 minutiB 



Erin Brokovich 



What Lies Beneath 

Harrleon Ford and Mkheli 
nnt a 
In the 
School or 




y^r -^ 



Length: ene minuti 



Jiia Robert! «ya into 
PoMl to tal( to a proteaor. 
Ingth: less then a minutB 



rv9 fmrd ttmt KmvtMT 
Hatl$amofa»l^pt$am 
of OoMc troNtwctm t/iti'B 
mmaabk ntr mn^ klm m 
EmtOoutktItoLUSC 
domnt hmm too nmny ImM- 
tm»»tim.''-Kmmlloh 




C<*iPiLED BY Howard Ho am> Bf.\kki.v Bra(.a GRACIELA SANDOVAL/Daily Briin Senior Stakk 

Photos from Miramax, MGM, Universal Pictures, Dreamworks SKG 



-~\ 



Yawn. Waking np Is hard to do, but hey, 
I've got three finals tomorrow, one right 
after another. It's going to be nine 
straight hours of bloody murder, but luckily I 
have an indestnictible game plan for how to 
ace them. 

I ani your average college student, who, 
like you, once worried about the pressures 
of being at prestigious UCLA, what with 
unweighted GPAs, impersonal lecture halls, 
cataclysmic fmals aiid all* It may sound 
roiigli. but really it's a piece of pie in the 
sky. But what often get 
lost in this college equa- 
tion are the merits of 
staring at paint on a can- 
vas, ta(:)ping fingers on a 
piano, and gluing eyes to 
a television screen (no. 
not literally). CoUege is 
Uie delicate balance of 
one on top of the other. 
The plan therefore is to 
have no plan. 

After waking up and 
skipping breakfast 
(things to do, people to 
see), I join my study 

group, because ray friend Yan Yan is there 
and I think it would be nice if she posed 
nude for my art assignment. Next I'm off to 
Ackerman Union's dining areas for some ice 
to console Yan Yan's hearty slap to my face. 
Boy, if only my parents knew how I suffered 
for art. The truth is that my assignment was 
for my class, Heideggerian Hermeneutics 
101, where we are supposed to use words U) 

1 




Howard Ho 

hhogime(fa.uc>a.eiJii 



incite passion. My professor sure would be 
proud. 

My next class, an Honors Collegium 
which studies the effect of Brazilian rainfor- 
est ant nugrations on the Enron scandal, 
requires in-depth research on chaos mathe- 
matics, biology and economics. Luckily, last 
night I rented "Jurassic Park" for the chaos 
theory, "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective" for 
biology and "Wall Street" for economics. 
Powell Library even has a room for watch- 
ing movies, and there 1 watch them one by 
one. 

Alrighty then, after learning that greed is 
good and dinosaurs are undesirable, 1 go to 
choir practice and sing my heart out on a 
Verdi aria The lyrics are from 
Shakespeare's play "OtheUo," which helps 
since we're reaiding "Othello" in my En^ish 
class. 

Walking back to the dorms, I see a crowd 
of people at the Ackerman Grand Ballroom 
waiting to get iiiside. 1 elbow my way in and 
find that Adam Sandler is singing his newest 
incarnation of the Hanukkah song on stage. 
Did you know that Spock and Captain Kirk 
are Jewish? Sandler also points out that 
Heidegger was a supporter of Hitler, thus 
explaining his abandonment of phenome- 
nology and dasein analysis in the 1930s. I jot 
this down on my hand and remember to use 
it for tomorrow's essay question. 

Now it's time to go clubbing and I start 
dressing to impress. My pseudo-punk rocker 
roommate bangs on his guitar and I watch 
him gleefully rip through Metallica chorus- 
es. I high-five him and drive off to meet my 



date. We go to Miyagi's on Sunset only Xo 
realize that its dance floor resembles a sar- 
dine can more than a dance floor. Some 
underage drunk vomits on my arm and I 
wash it off. 

Panic-stricken, I realize the Heidegger 
notes on my hand are washed away and I 
franticaUy call my roommate's cell to see 
where he is. Hopefully, our high five left a 
trace of my notes on his hand. 

1 travel across town to the Paladium to 
meet him at a Green Day concert and copy 
down my notes. Reluctant to miss the fiin of 
the gig, I join the mosh pit and get spit on 
by BiUie Joe Armstrong. The spit obeys the 
laws of chaos mathematics, flying randomly 
into the fractal image that is a rock concert 
That does it for me and I go home. 

I take the finals the next day, and I don't 
need to tell you that I haven't flunked out of 
school (if I had, they wouldn't let me write 
for the Daily Bruin). I may have exaggerated 
how easy classes are, but life is for living, 
for relationships among friends and lovers, 
for whimsical decisions to chart unknown 
places, for exploration into the heart of 
what it means to have a heart. In other 
words, Heidegger, Sandler, clubbing. Green 
Day and Yan Yan all mix into this goo which 
is my life. 

Since goo rhymes with shoe and shoes 
are required for heroic joume3rs of the 
UCLA kind, I suggest you drop those books 
once in a while, skip class and see some of 
the art and entertainment that's going on in 
the worid around you. Hey, it may even 
make you smarter. 



Under 21 doesn't mean out of luck: Los Angeles club scene student-friendly 



ByAnthortyBronfiberg 

I imYBRUW SENIOR STMF 
abroh[iberg@media.uctaxju 

It happens to everyone. You walk 
down into Westwood with your 
friends, laughing, slightly inebriated 
with the ni^t air. 

Tliou^tlessly, you approach the 
local bar and for some reason or 
other fall into the back of your group. 
One by one, your friends file into the 
upstanding establishment as voices, 
music and TV noise filters out 
throu^ the open door 

Finally, you make your way up to 
the bouncer and gingerly pull out 
your New Jersey ID claiming you're 
23. Then, POW, he looks down at you 
shaking his head from, on high. Now 
you're stuck outside, cold and des- 
perately trying to get a hold of some- 
one, anyone, on your blue-covered 
Nokia cell phone, to walk back up to 



the dorms with you. 

It happens to the best of us, but it 
doesn't have to be this way. 

Los Angeles has a night-life scene 
aimed at the all-ages and 18-and-over 
crowds. Dance cJubs like The Palace, 
Rage and Blue, among others, have at 
least some all-ages events or 18-and- 
over ni^ts during a regular week. 

This ensures that legal drinking 
age adults aren't the only ones who 
can go out on the town with the sur- 
real Los Angeles nightscape reflected 
in their pupils and lust murmuring in 
their hearts. Legal voters who aren't 
yet legal drinkers still have the oppor- 
tunity to get sweaty in a dark room 
pulsing with the movements of bod- 
ies and flashing lights. 

Of course, everyone has their own 
reasons for venturing out into the 
temperate orange night glow of 
Westwood and beyond. People go out 
to clubs to dance and consort with 



fiiends away from, a school atmos- 
phere, or to find a fit and willing part- 
ner for romantic, or not so romantic, 
endeavors. 

"I guess a lot of people go to hook 
up, and the way people dance, if 
you've gone to just one, you know it's 
sexual," said Armie Wong, a fourth- 
year student in a phone interview. "It 
depends on which clubs you go to, 
some are more like meat nurkets 
than others." 

Wong isn't a frequent club-goer, but 
has been to both l^and-up as well as 
21-and-up clubs. She sees some dif- 
ferences between the two as well as 
between male and female aggressive 
interaction. 

"At 21-and-over clubs they talk 
more, rather than just going for Nvhat- 
ever,'" Wong said. "Sometimes a guy 
wiU fireak a giri fion\ behind aivl just 
expect her to keep dancing, which we 
don't really appreciate. The most suc- 



cessful ones are when a girl does 
something subtle to introduce herself 
like flip her hair." 

People who want to dance for the 
sheer joy of the stimulating muscle 
and joint movement itself might find a 
more accommodating environment at 
one of Los Angeles' many gay clubs 
like Rage or Tlgerheat Jessica Jung, a 
fourth-year sociology student, prefers 
the atmo^ihere of Tlgerheat if she's 
not out to meet guys. 

"For me as a strai^t female it's a 
much more comfortable environment 
without the guy coming up and grc^ 
ing me or saying something lewd," 
Jung said. "The last time I went I was 
in shorts and a T-shirt and just danced 
for four hours." 

Still, according to Jung, the straight 
club atmosphere isn't overly sexually 
hostile and is less so than the near- 
can^)us fiBtemity parties. 

On top of dancing and sexuality, 



the key to a good club outing, accord- 
ing to Jung, is the music. 

"The music can make or break the 
experience," Jung said. "I've had 
e3q)eriences where you pay a $20 
cover and they just play techno for 
four hours, and that can be hard to 
dance to." 

Dance clubs aren't the only night- 
life proprietors who cater to the 
younger crowd Los Angeles is rife 
with music venues, both stage and 
cinema theaters, as well as the other 
clubs - comedy clubs. 

The funnier if less physically 
mobile counterparts of dance dubs 
may even be more targeted towards- 
the youth crowd. 

According to Ezra Weisz, the 
admiiustrative director of the Bang 
(Domedy <31ub and a teacher, clubs 
like Bang embrace the over 18 audi- 
ence and anycme who can do the 
higher level thinking to gra^ comedy 



as a serious art form. Weisz feels that 
ccnnedy at clubs ^/liiere drinking is 
involved tends to be sloppier, while 
the comedians and improvisers at 
clubs like Bang want to provide a 
solid show to elevate their craft 

"The colleges give us our most 
loyal and favorite fans, the ones who 
are most inspiring for our perform- 
ers," Weisz said. "There's no way we'd 
shut that age group out from adult- 
hood until you can drink." 

The atmosphere of comedy clubs 
facilitates entertainment, but is less 
of a social environment, which leaves 
those under 21 back where they start- 
ed, shaking their booties. Or there's 
always that other option. 

"You have to be 21 to drink, techni- 
cally, but it's pretty easy to slide 
around that most of the time," Wong 
said. 

The bouncer can't shake his head 
allof the time. 




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20 



THE DAILY BRUIN -ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



BURNER 

from page M 



den I started thinkiniR, This Ls kind of 
fiin." 

After her siuxess doing a duet, she 
soon turned to solos when she went 
onto the stage to sing "Adelaide's 
Lament" fn>m "(iuys and l>()lls." 

"All of a sudden I realized, this is 
what I wanna do." Burnett said. "I 
want to go to New York and be on 
Broi»dway and be Uke Ethel Memian. 
I had all tht^se dreaiiLs, so I pursued 
theni. I C'L\ was a starting point for 
me." 

^Ith theater. C^irol Burnett was 
transformed from an average girl with 
a humble barkgroimd into a vibrant, 
magnetic entertauier. 

"At Hollywood High, I wasn't a nerd 
exactJy, but certaiiUy not one that any- 
body would think would have the 
nerve to get up and do what I did at 
UCLA," Burnett said. ""So years later, I 
got some letters from kids I went to 
Hollywood High with, and they would 
say 'Is that really you?'" 

Bunu'U knew she ultimately want- 
ed to try her luck in the Big Apple, but 
her obstacle again was lack of money 
However, someone else's generosity 
again aided Burnett in her pursuits 
when sIm^ encountered a wealthy man 
at a dinner party where she was per- 



I 



forming a scene from "Annie Get Your 
Gim" 

"He lent me $1000 and said 'this is 
payable in five years and there are 
stipulations: you must never reveal 
my name, and if things hajipen for 
you, then you should help other peo- 
ple out too. I qiut school and went to 
New York," Burnett said. 

Burnett left before graduating and 
felt it was time to put her UCLA edu- 
cation to the test. She eventually 
achieved prominence in New York, 
but never forgot the promise to her 
benefactor For over 20 years she has 
given $1,000 each year to an outstand- 
ing UCLA student in musical theater 

Burnett also directed "Once Upon a 
Mattress" at UCLA in 1999, the same 
musical comedy that brought Burnett 
to the Broadway stage 40 years 
before. 

"I think it's wonderful Uiat (I^CLA) 
is respecting musical comedy more. 
That's one of the rt^asons I started the 
scholarship was to encourage that 
particular art form b<»cause it's truly 
American," Burnett said. 

Burnett has shown the world tliat 
with some luck, talent and resiUency 
you don't need to be a Barrymore or a 
Coppola to make it in the world. 

"There are a lot of people who are 
in the position 1 was in who don't have 
money So you make your own choic- 
es. If you really want to do it, you will 
find a way to do it," Burnett said. 



jIRIS 



<&ENTERTAINIIENT 



(K)PP01A 

from page S 

master, through UCL\ profes- 
sor Dorothy Arzner in 1961 
and later worked for Roger 
Corman productions on his 
first full-length film, "Dementia 
13." During the shoot, he met 
UCLA art graduate Eleanor 
Neil, who he later married. 

Coppola withdrew from his 
UCLA education after winning 
the prestigious Samuel 
Goldwyn Award for his screen- 
play, "Pilma, Pilma," a rework- 
ing of "The TVo Christophers." 
The award led to job oCTers 
from the msgor studios. 
Coppola ended up working on 
scripts for Seven Arts 
Productions, where he direct- 
ed "You're a Big Boy Now" in 
1966. He submitted the film as 
his graduate thesis, and it 
earned him his degree. 

His meteoric rise, including 
his Oscar win for the screen- 
play to "Patton," continued 
with producing Lucas' classics 
"American Graffiti" and "THX 
1138" with American 
Zoetrope. Coppola's power 
would then be solidified in 
1972 when "The Godfather" 



was a m^yor critical and finan- 
cial success. 

An icon of the film world 
today, Coppola nostalgically 
remembers his early days at 
UCLA 

"I feel much wiser now, 
though perhaps that's a nega- 
tive in that it makes one less 
likely to plunge into areas as 
wildly as youth tends to. Also, 
not being as financially desti- 
tute could mean that I have 
less of the what do I have to 
lose' attitude and that might 
make a difference," Coppola 
said. 

Now Coppola thirUcs about 
the future of filnmiaking and 
all the tools that he didn't have 
growing up. He cites computer 
programs Pinal Cut F*ro and 
HD24 digital sound as m^yor 
advances in allowing anyone 
to make a professional-quality 
film. In addition, his recent 
release of "The Godfather" tril- 
ogy on DVD with deleted 
scenes and conmientary allow 
for a greater degree of interac- 
tion between filmmaker and 
filmgoer. 

"Movies have always been 
the marriage of art and tech- 
nology, so the grand advances 
happening today continue to 
make the cinema more adven- 



turous and even promiscuous 
- and for less money each day. 
This is wonderful," Coppola 
said. 

Coppola would certainly be 
pleased if he were a student 
today to find that film and tele- 
vision now includes digital 
media as well. As Coppola 
himself says about the demise 
of film and the rise of digital 
media, "Film is dead. Long live 
cinema" 

Hard at work on his sci- 
ence-fiction epic, 
"Megalopolis," Coppola main- 
tains his independent spirit, 
even with such big-budget 
fare. At age 63, Coppola con- 
tinues to push the limits of 
what he can do and urges 
young filmmakers to find their 
own smaller paths. 

"Certainly, 'Megalopolis,' is 
ambitious and probably above 
my means in many ways, 
which in the past never 
deterred me," said Coppola 

"I would tell (young film- 
makers) to avoid big conglom- 
erate Hollywood, where the 
*M' stands for money and not 
movies. ... Weave your work on 
whatever level you can afford, 
with stills and little audio 
recordings first if necessary," 
Coppola added. 



WARREN 

from p\ge V 

commercials, but her hear remains with the the- 
ater. "\ 

"Musical theater isn't is appreciated as it 
should be. It's the hardest to do, because you 
have acting, singing and daicing all in one, and 
it's bve," she said. 

Thou^ show business cui be a worid of 
rejection, Wanren feels like sl»'s up to the chal- 
lenge. After graduating, she p«is to go to New 
York and put what she's leame| at UCLA to the 
test 

But she feels more confident vith the encour- 
agement she's received from proj»ssors and with 
achievements like the Carol Bun>tt Award. 

"It always feels good to get ticouragement 
from people in the professional v^rid, because 
nine times out of 10 you're going t get rejected, 
and not get the job. John Hall, ly professor, 
always teUs us 'You've gotta sell y<ir package.' 
And when you get awards it means i^at they like 
what you're selling," Warren said 

Warren hopes her award will bri^ her suc- 
cesses similar to Burnett, who made ^r theatri- 
cal ascent in New York after leaving U^LA 

"Carol Burnett is an amazing womax she has 
been a pioneer for women in musical th^ter and 
has op)ened so many doors and win^ws of 
opportunity for young women today \at are 
a^iring young actresses as she was," /arren 
said. "Maybe one day I will be able to loo.back 
on my career and be able to have someoh say 
the same things about me. I hope so." 



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ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • THE DMIY aMHN 



21 



KAUFMAN I Grad hopes to defy stereotypes 



from pa4£ M 

worid 

"I'm so tirrd jf seeing Asian 
males representee as scientists or 
k\mg fii artists, btf never as roman- 
tic leads," said Kaifiiian. 

Certainly. tJie mk>1 of Asian talent 
Ls expanding. y< it is still bleak in 
terms of gen«s. Kaufman cites 
Asian parents dBappro\'ing of acting 
as a professioi for their children as 
a reason for the limited pool of 
Asian talent i» /Vmerica. 

Kaufman dnuself looks nothing 
hke the steeotypical math or sd- 
ence-orientd Asian nerd. The bald 
2i>-year-oldJtudied tnmipet jx^rfor- 
manc5e at (iio's Oberlm C^oUege and 
later gradtoted with a degree in 
English iter Ol)erlin, he taught 
eighth gnrte RngUsh and coached 



HEAD IT 

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UCLA'S Jewish Newsmagazine 



girls soccer at a private school in 
New Jersey. 

To teach literature, he would 
show film versions of books the 
class had read. There the discussion 
often slanted toward filmmaking 
techruques, which Kaufhian loved 
but hadn't studied formally 
Applying to l^CLA film school on a 
dare from his students, he was 
accepted to the directing program in 
spite of never having made a film 
before. 

"What's neat about UCLA's gradu 
ate film program is that they don't 
necessarily look for people who are 
filmmakers already. They look for 
people who are storytellers, cre- 
ative, and have had different bves. 
'Hiere are former lawyers and busi- 
ness people in my classes," Kaufinan 
said. 



Having won the Motion Picture 
Association of America's Young 
FUmmakers Award twice as well as 
watching the Polish brothers at 
work with Nick Nolte, Kaufman is 
brimming with optimism about his 
newfound connections. With digital 
cameras and the potential of online 
video streaming, he hopes to join 
the Polish brothers in the indie 
world of high talent and low bud- 
gets. 

"I got inspired because I got a 
sense that if I had a story I'm pas- 
sionate about, it's possible in this 
daj^and age to make an independent 
film with truly talented people," he 
said. "At UCLA, my job for the neort 
two years is to make films that I care 
about in a nurturing environment, 
not a studio which says this film is 
not going to sell." i 



Ballroom Dance Club at UCLA 



Monday* 7-11p.in. OUCLA Ackarman Unton 2*Fk>or Loung* room 2414 
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ballroom@ucla.edu 



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22 



THE DAILY BRUIN • ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



CLASSIFIED 



■ ; 



Index 



Announcements 



1100 Campus Happenings 
1200 Canipu s Onar Uzations 
12SD Greaks Cmn 
1300 CampusJ^ayrtment 
1400 Campus Senicss 
^m OrlMays 
1600 LegalNolices 
MOO LottAFound 
1000 Mb n ttne au s 
^mo ObHuariKCm) 
igP PanonHUmtagiu 
2000 /^TMnit 
20BO Pregnancy 
210) /taorMritana^/lctMMi 
2200 /Iw aar u/ i 5^i<^|»t? 
2300 Sperm/Egg Donors 
2«0 noMrdHM 
2900 TMsClNMM 
2B00 MMM 



Merchandise 



2700 >^|*rK» 
2B00 /Vtf^MTvs 
2900 afcKteSoIss 
3000 Boots 

3100 Cii^v^^^'Dt^ 
3200 C^mara^Qmconlsrs 
3300 Q.#)tmj& 
3«)0 QriUBrs Cgr 



3490 So/^Mn^Bmes 
3B0O arA#e 
3000 (jtr2vi»1tn/Site 
:!nQO Heam Pmducts 



3800 MusicailnsHjments 
4000 OOkxEqu^mt 
4100 AM 

4200 RgnbtEquijment 
4300 ^]cr6figu|ynanr 
4400 aactoncDevioGs 



Transportation 



4600 AiD/tosssDrte 
4700 AutDtvLnnce 

^BOD AulDRBpar 
moo AulostFSat 
9000 aoafrtrSiri? 
5100 MAn^ols far Siip 
S200/Mtv 
S300 ScoQigrC^/aqnr 
5400 ScDOlysibrSil? 
9B0O iMbl9ibr/ianr 



Travel 



CD, 



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9HD Ibi^ DeBtvlbns 
5700 iM^TbM 
5720 \ikMon F^ckaggs 



Services 



1-900 numbers 

6000 tuMWce 

6100 CompulBBtaBmet 
6190 Fonign Languages 
6200 hbHfiaeoV^^rMQBS 
6250 A:til9lMxla»v Cleses I 
6300 L6|0AMca^>ttcme>«> 
6«0 MpversSkyaoe 
6600 Mbac Hasans 
6600 penanalSentes 
6700 fiu h BauM fSgntas 
6600 Rgaunes 
Ono ft to rii n ncaianB 
HID ItytvOfevK^ 
7100 lUbr^Nintot/ 
7200 Tjfftm 

7300 mmgHBip 



Employment/Careers 



7400 Ajitaw (]|ppani4n/8es 
7900 QrBor^yxTtnlai 

7000 CHUCareOnand 
TKD OmCanmraBd 
7nO/*t;MMBtf 

TBaoHbrvftc^jUtei^ 

7B00 /tueoMv 

8000 htnat0 
8100 




8200 TimpaaryEmptofnent 
8300 IttfAsar 



Housing 



8400 Apartments for Rent_ 

8490 ^jwl Wife to Shan; I 

8500 Apartnenlsl 

8800 OcmoniMatouae lor Rent 

8700 OancbTiwtajsetrSale 

8600 QuBStvuae tor Rant 

8000 HouaelbrRBnt 

9000 HouaekrSBt 

9100 HouaBboaftstorRaWSaie 

9200 HousngNaadBd 

9300 fkiomfarHB0 

9nD RoomtrRent 

9500 RoomnwaBB-f^l^eaBRoom 

9800 RoommBiBaShBrBdRoom 

MOO McAn/ientils 



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31 0.8^5.2221 



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By Phone 

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By Fax 

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each additional word 6.50 

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SUMMER 







il-^LIASI YOUK WORKIIt 



Tha ASUCLA Corr¥nmcaiKxw tx)«d tJh tuppora vw OravvraMy o« Ctttommt potcy on nondMofenfetaltan No mM>un tttt aooapl a&imtmmnmM wMch pro—nt poreone o( any origin, 
rac* MK (V » r-i rf cnwHaBon n a d«na««ng way or to tnply thai tMy are ai«a J poartiona. capabiNiaa. rotaa. or aMua In aoaaly. M altiai thm OMy Bruin nor iha ASUCLA Corrvnuncalun 
Boat) tmt tTtwm^mH «fy o( ttw aarvtoaa adtamaad or tta t&ttnmmmt twpmmi m a n tva aaua Any paraon balw>Hg *m an adwartiaamani m Ma laaua vtaMad tha Board'* policy on 

iiuiMjauin»lli.iiiitalirf"n- r- '" ■ — ' ^.^—^ ^....m^t^*^ n n....^ rw».«».n»fc. n^un n a KarciiNillHai, 308 Mkatwood Plaza. LoaAngalaa 90024-1 Ml Foraaaia- 

twc* iW»t houa^ tfaownnMion probivTw. ctf r« UCLA Houamg CMC* ai (310) 8?V4?71 or can Iha Waaiaid a Fa» Houaog OWca al (310) 475-9671 ClaaaMad ada aiao appaar on-lma 
ai tmpjfwww dMlyb>\«i uda adu Piacwnam on-kna • oflarad aa a cxynpimantary larvica tor cuatomara and • not guarantaad Tha Daily Bru»i « raaponaibla lor Iha flr« Inoorract maar- 
bon only Mirxy tyuo^^f^tcM mnort wa not aiigOla lor raluida For any ralund. iha Oany Brun Cl a«a * * fl Oapartmar.t muatt>a rvxrfiad o« an arrxir on iha flrvt day o( publica ti on by noop 



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announcements 

100-2600 



1100 

Canipus Happeninc|s 



ballroom@ucla.edu 

LEARN 

SWING-SALSA-TANGO 

SPACE IS LIMITED!!! 

Annual or Fall Quarter 

Memberships 
Postmarked by Aug.31st 

SAVE 20% 
First Meeting Sept.30th 

Mondays 7-11pm@UCLA Ackerman Union- 
2nd Floor Lounge #2414 See schedule @ 
www.8tudentgroup8.ucla.edu/ballroomdance 
Wednesday Location-TBA. Mail your member- 
ship today to BDC/IFDC 914 Westwood 
Blvd.f299 L.A. CA 90024. LEARN SWING- 
SALS A-TANGO-WALTZ-CH ACHA-LINDY- 
HOP&more with the Ballroom Oarx^e Club& In- 
ternational Folk Dance Club at UCLA. E-mail 
ballroom®ucla.edu or UniversityDance- 
Clubs® yahoo.com 310-284-3636. ANNUAL 
MEMBER BENEFITS include 150+ hours of 
Free Dance Lessons. Free Swing/Salsa Par- 
ties, Free Quarterly Semi-Formals, 5Free-lce 
Cream Sociais, Free-Club/T-Shirt &Fun Weel<- 
ly-Fieid-Trips include discounted additional 
lessons & Parties® L.A.'s most popular Night- 
Clubs-featuring Live SWING-SALSA-TAN- 
QO&Ballroom Music 310-284-3638 Carpool- 
ing-As8l8tanoe www.geodties.con>/SwingSai- 
saTango. EMglbiKty for the BDC/IFDC-Pertorm- 
ing Dance Group (RehearsaJs-Mondays6:15- 
7pm®Ack.24144-Wednesday Locatk)n-TBA). 
28th Romantic Dance-Les8on-Serie8(9/30- 
12/2) Experience the Joy of Danc- 
ingll!!!!!!!lll!lll!! Where Great Romances Begin 
EVERYONE WELCOME!!!!! 

BIG SALSA DANCE 

15TH ANNUAL NEW 

STUDENT WELCOME 

MONDAY 0CT.21 St 

SALSA LESS0NS@8pm 

LIVE MUSIC!!!! 

FREE CELEBRATION •^'QPM'aiAGB 

^UCLA Ackerman Union Grand BaJIroom-^nd 
,4loor. Rrst 1000 Partk^panttjajM admitted. 
See InspiratraruU Salsa/Merengue Pertorming 
DarKe Groups. Questions call 310-284-3636. 
Funll! balroomducla.edu 
www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ballroomdance 
Get ready for the lafgest dance event of the 
year-SALSA Lessons every Monday @ 10p.m. 
OUCLA-Ackerman-Uniorv2414 beginning 
Sept. 30th. 

EXPERIENCE SO+YEAR 

TRADITION AT UCLA 

SALSA LESSON® 10pm 

EVERY MONDAY 

LEARN FAMOUS LINE/ROMANTIC PARTN- 
ER DANCES. Mondays 9pm 1st Meeting 
9/309UCLA Ackennan#2414. Learn Salsa 
'Cuban-Casino-Rueda' Lessons Every 
Monday 10-1 1pm Enjoy darxang to cool music 
from Brazil-Greece-Mexico-France-Japan- 
Turkey-Egypt-ltafy-Bulgaria-Spain-lsrael-Mo- 
rocco-Anmenia-lrelarxl-Europe-NorthAmerica- 
Asia-Afnca-SouthAmerica-THE WORLD!!!! In- 
ternational Folk Dance Club® UCLA 310-284- 
3636 Special Cultural-Evenings:La- 
tJn10/21(Live-SALSA-Musk:), Greek11/4, Ar- 
menian 11/18, ( Persian- Arabic-Israeli 1 1 /25) . 
Special-Event Saturday 11/23 Celebrating 
19th Century England/Europe/ZVmerica Loca- 
tion TBA (African-Asian Dates-TBA) Universi- 
tyDanceClubs® yahoo. com Co-sponsorship 
of other Cultural Student Organizatk>ns/Cam- 
pus Departments Wek»me!lll!ll www.student- 
groups.uda.edu/baHroomdance/IFDC.html 



2200 

earch Subjects 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



JOIN THE 

PERFORMING 

DANCE GROUP 

Demonstrate fun dances @on4off-campus 
cultural events. Weekly Lessons/Rehearsals 
Mondays 6:15-7pm @UCLA Ackerman- 
Union(room-241 4) First-meeting-Sept.30th 
Wed.Location-TBA- 

www.studentgroups.uda.edu/ballroomdance/l 
FDCPDG.html Call 310-284-3636 or email 
Unlver8ityDanceClubs@yahoo.com pr ball- 
room® ucla.edu Annual BDC/IFDC member- 
ship required. 

SIGN UP NOW! 

WOODEN CENTER NEW BEGINNING TAI 
CHI CHUAN Summer Session. Tradittonal 
Yang Styte. Contact Rudy 310-825-0518 or 
Wooden Center Also Tai Chi Chuan Club 
Summer Program. Master Karol: 818-996- 
3787. 



SUMMER LESSONS 
MONDAYS 7-1 0p.m. 

©Ackerman Union 2408 
Swing-Salsa-Tango 
ENDS August 26th 

Field Trips ail Summer 

LEARN SWING-SALSA-TANG0-WALTZ®7 
p.m. LearTvPopular-Llne/Folk-Dances9-10pm 
www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ballroomdance 
www.geocities.com/SwingSalsaTar>go Ball- 
room-Dance-C lub& Intemational-Folk-Dance- 
Club. 310-284-3636 bailroom@ucia.edu 



9200 

Campus Organizations 



DO YOU LOVE? 
ISRAELI DANCE 

LA. DANCE/SOCIAL EVENTS 7 NIGHTS A 
WEEK. www.geodties.com/lsraelklarK* Email 
lsraeliDance@yahoo.com 
Mondays/Wednesdays at UCLA. 

Tuesdays/Thursdays in tf>e Valley. 
GREAT EXERCISE for the MIND & BODY! 
Enjoy hdklay weekend dance campsA attend 
dance festivals in Brazil(December), Mexi- 
co{March), USA-Canada, & Israel(July). ^3k 
about the Israeli Dance Performing Group at 
UCLA. 310-284-3638. 

JANE AUSTEN 

VICTORIAN-RAGTIME 

VIENNESE-WALTZ 

VICTORY-SWING 

DANCES 

EXPERIENCE HISTORY 

Annual Southern California Autumn Ball, Sat- 
urday, October 12th 7:30-mWn»ght. Leam sim- 
ple-elegant ballroom dances of the early 
I9thcentury. Lessons 10am/2pm, Tea Time- 
4pm. Costumes welcome/not required. Dinner 

included. For information call 213-364-66 22. 
Details at www.regencyfriends.org 43rd-SDl- 
Victorian-Grand Costume Ball Novemt>er- 
30th. Contact laha@pact>ell.net. 818-892- 
3454. UniversityDanceClubs@yahoo.com 
CarpooHng available, call BDC 310-284-3636 
284-3638. For upcoming histork^ costume 
dances see www.studentgroups.ucia.eduA>ail- 
roomdance/historicaldances.html or BDC 
Honrtepage www.studentgroups.ucia.eduA>aH- 
roomdance 



1800 

Miscellaneous 



ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Your on-campus & on-line banking source for 
students, empk)yees & aiumni. Free checking, 
student k>ar^, car loar>s. Campus offk*: Ack- 
erman A-level, www.ucu.org, caU 310-477- 
6628. 



2200 

Research Subjects 



EARN $100. SUBJECTS WITH YELLOW 
TEETH needed for a teeth whitening study be- 
ing conducted Culver City (3 visits). 310-845- 
8330. 

HEALTHY ADULTS NEEDED for a research 
study on mucosal immunity at UCLA. The re- 
search study involves medical procedures in- 
duding bkxxl donatk>ns arxj sigmoidoscopies 
(a flexible tube put into the rectum). Subjects 
wiH be pakj up to $100 per visit. To find out 
more about the s study call: Charles Price at 
310-206-7288 Peter A. Antion M.D., Dept of 
Medk:ine, Prindpal Investigator. 

SMOKERS WANTED!!! 

EARN $10 IN 25 MINUTES. Fun easy memo- 
ry study. Anonymous. On Campus. Call Dani: 
310-801-1406 or email danip@postmark.net 



2200 

Res-arch Subjects 



WOMEN AGES 18-40with and without pre- 
menstnjal syndrome wetted for a 3 month re- 
search study which enta^ mood diaries, bkxxl 
tests, 2 OPTIONAL spint-taps and taking Pro- 
zac for 14 days. Must ncbe taking any other 
medk^tion $350forvourmo 310-82&-2452. 



2300 

Sperm/^ig Donors 



EGG DONOR rEEDED 

By infertile coupie-not an a«ncy, (wife js 
Bruin alumni). Dark hair arxi^yes arid un- 
der 27 y/o preferred. $4000 c more Larry 
310-914-7600. 



Pay your tui jon 
r with eggs 



If you're a woman betweetig 
and 35, you can earn money e«i. 
ly, anonymously. Donate youi 
eggs to an infertile couple. 
$5,000 and up, depending on 
you education and other qualifi- 
cations. Call Today. 

The Center for Egg Optk>ns 
310/546-6786 

•TTte Center for Egg OpOorH, LLC 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 1 8-31 
wishing to help infertile couples. 

$5,000 
k CALL MIRNA (8 1 8) 832- 1 494 « 




34f50 

Softwao^^ames 



XBOX FOR SALE! Perfect condition. Includes: 
halo, 4 controllers, DVD remote. Al this for 
only $2501 Please call 310-804-1507. 



3500 

Furniture 



FULL SIZE REFRIGERATOR AND FREEZER. 
Brand new, $250 or obo. 310-452-9801 . 



A^^AAAA^ 



^nsportauon 

4600-5500 



A600 

Auto Accessories 



BEST PRICES car audio/video all brarxte. 
CD/DVD, monitors, head units, woofers, 
amps, rims, lighting-wnore. Pat:31 0-877-7997. 
Earn $ this sumn>er too! 



2200 

^l^earch Subjects 



iSf. 4^ ii^ iSi> iStiiS& lS^ lS^ iS& lS^ ii& iiSi iaSiiS& lS^ li^ lifr ^ 

a. 






Do you hove cilli^'^i^ 
ciround cols? 



If you hove problems around cots, you mai^ be Interested In 
(XtrtJclpoting in o dinicol study of on investigotionol use of o 

FDfl-opproved medicotlon. 



During the studi/, ^ou uilll receive 

Free allergy tests 

Free medication for your allergies 

Financial compensation up to $385 



If you ore interested, pieose coil: 
Dr. Jonathan Corren, MD 
Clinical Faculty at UCLA 
310-477-1734 
extension 242 



JS^j^f^:j^^:j^jj^;f^;^^jj^jj^^^:jS 



4^ 

.M. 



.t& 




.)^ 



y' 



4 



GUtSSIHED 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 






200 

Rpsel irrlTf*Si 1 1) j ec t s 



2200 

Researcli Subjects 




ICi>nsidef a new vaginal gel designed to protect 
against pregancy and infection. Couples who 
join a major, federally funded study will test a 
diaphragm with either the gel or regular 
spermcide as birth control for 7 m6nths. 

$300 

plus f"ee supplies, movie passes/CDS/video rentals 
I Coll SCO 521 5211 



Ho » Oil ^iil'IVr Irom m'\oit PrMiiriMriial S\mnioiih? 



UCLA art Bwlw LaboTitolw >B conduding a 6 month r M earc ^ study fa 
SynfMMsfMS) You may quiVy tor Vik ilwty If you oqwhenca some of Vw ' " 
we0l( BtoM your imn t M tk cfM 

• Dcffcnci BMod • Taisk>B • IrritabUin • Fccliag taddcal 
Qurifytng partlcipanb nut 

• Hav« I' m al w Mtmi ■■! cycin 

• Be bctwcra tiM aan vf IS'aad 4« (M if yo«'re ■ toMker). 

• N«( b« ■fiaii ■ K<k< d» M Ibr tlM trMtiMM sf PMS, 
iBclsdiBx «BttihpriwH. kcrtal tr et— ti vr birtk cob 



monstruai 
the 



Mstuitv rvMid evaluitlotw wM IM DTOvWad at no 




Some wnmen MM be gwen tw Study mediation, and diin «vW receive a 

You mM be paid for your partdpaOon 
T« get more infomuition aboat takiag part in this st«d 
Coatact Dr. Aadrea RapUa at UCLA OB/GVN 




Wf^, 



(310)825-2452 



2300 

Spemi/Efjn Donois 



2300 

Sperni/Egf) Donor- 



Don't call your parents 
for extra cash. 

CaU us. 



If you're male, in college or 
tiave a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
wtiere you can earn up to 
$600 per montti. call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
comprehensive healtti 
screening . Plus you can 
tielp Infertile couples 
realize ttieir dream of 
becoming parents. So If 
you're looking for a great 
^ob «uid iittie extra cash, 
call us first. 




fiejeibU hours 
mimmm-time 
commitment 



310-824-9941 

or check out our website at 
http*7/www.cryobank.com/donors 



A900 

Autos for Snif? 



5500 

Vehicle for Rent 



1983 FORD 
MUSTANG 

Black exterior, btack intehor. automatic. 
Power everything. Gkxxl condition. Price 
negotiable. 323-547-8167 323-269-9960. 



*ea Tmmportati 
to a Party or 
Speck 



1987 CHEVY NOVA. Brown. 4-door. automat- 
ic. A/C $795obo. 1983 Toyota Cwnry. A/C, 
New brake ayalem. rebuiil engine, stick-shift. 
$796otX). 310-429-9924 

1990 VW JETTA Excelent condition, many 
new parts, moving must sel. asking $22S0o- 
bo. 310-922-3006. 

1904 BMW. 316i convartabie, t)lack on black, 
aulontatk:. 88000 milas, great corxlition. 
$11,850 310-841-0480 

1996 HONDA CIVIC DX COUPE. Red, 2dr. 
manual, OOk. $6200 obo email: 
mhaahtoa#yhoo.com or c^ 310-476-7016. 

FOR SALE: 1986 HONDA CIVIC Gray 
Ongmai owr>er Excele n t condHksn. $4000. 
310-296-3343. cal between 5-7pm. 

JET BLACK WRANGLER 

93'. &-cyinder, &-speed 65k mlaa. aloys, 
bucket aaala. Cualoni bumpersAala. alareo. 
ExceletH coodWo" «niA' ^irv48^<1«7. 



51 OO 

:les for Sale 



School buses, coaches, 

vans, and Limousines 

for hire. 

call Gina (310)2: 
or (310)578-311! 

Let's Go 
Transportation 




o,-== U' 





ervice 

5800-7300 



2001 HONDA CBR 

F4I. 600CC. Lots of extras Red and wfWte. 
Halmat inckided. $7200. 310-701-2444 



S900 

Finnncial Aid 



S300 

Scooter/Cycle Repair 



STUDENT LOANS 

Unrversity Credit Unkxi is your Stafford and 
PLUS k>an lender (Lender Code 832123). 
Campus (Mce Ackerman A-level. 310-477- 

6628; www.ucu ora 





^jSt^m-^ci-'Z: 



^ k~ <> ^^>'t>- ■• i><t^i 'fe* 




)/lllstate. 



VbuYaingood handa 
Mike Azer Ir^surance Auency, Inc. 

(310)312-0202 

1281 W«8tvs/oocJ Blvd. 

C2 k:>lt(S So. or Wll«r>lr«> 

24 Hours g Doy Sefvlce 



Its like a K^ragei 
sale in the papen 



CycleTime Insurance Services 



Motorcycle • Motor Scooter • Moped 

UABaJTY INSURANCE IS THE LAWI 

rrS LESS THAN YOU THINK! 

NoKiddingI Ctf tor • kM quotel 

(310) 27S4734 

Exchange ad tor mranum $10.00 
dtacouni wl 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



"^^i^^^^msm^M^m^ 




mBt SBm 



^m^ 2300 
^gperm/Egn Donors 



*^ 2300 

i/Ecjg Donors 





For Couples Undergoing Fertility Treatment 



1 



21 - 34 years of age 
Non-smokers. No drugs 

Attractive Compensation to 
donor. If accepted into program 

Access to Recipients from Seven 
Selected Fertility Centers 



r 



mj 







Genesis Egg Donor Services 

For information, 

call Jeanne at ... 800/461-9622 



Wc arc a 100% Physician Based 
Donor Oocyte Program 

www.gefiesisivf . cofTi 
)eanne_ g enesig^hotmai(.cofn 



6150 

Foreign Langtiacjes 



FRENCH/PERSIAN 

(FARSI) 
PRIVATE TEACHER 

For t>eginr>erB arxl foreigriers. TrNinguai. 



Persian (Farsi)/French/Englah. 
aya 310-979-7040. 



Mrs. Sor- 



6200 

Health SfMVJ(:«?s 



DENTISTRY 

TEETH 
WHITENING 

DEFfTAL EXAlyk«-x-ray4Cleanlng, $60 Reg- 
ular $140 Teeth wt>ltenkig. $7S/arch. 10921 
WUsNre #S05. 310-824-0055 www.weaUa- 
dentist.com. Or. Moe Shammaie. 



6300 

Legal Advice/ Attorneys 



IMMIGRATION 

Grv«n Cards, Work I^rmlts, Change of 

Status, Citizenship, Visa Extensions, 

Company Start-ups, and more... 



» 



Anqel 



VBAOKTER" 



Reasonable Rates 

310-837-3266 Fax: 310-559-8479 

email: angelcti^>att.net 

Total Confidentiality Guaranteed. 
Privately Owned and Operated. 

Proud Member of the Better 
Business Bureau 




JERRYS MOVING&DELIVERY. The csreful 
movers. Experienced, reliable, same-day de- 
livery. Packing, boxes avajlable Also, pick-up 
dorutfkxw for Amehcan Cancer Society Jer- 
ry®310-391-5657. 



6500 

Music Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedk^aled profes- 
skx>al. At your hon>e or WLA studk). Ist-less- 
on free. No drum set necessary. Nei(:323-654- 
3226. 

FREE THE BEAUTY OF YOUR VOICE 
THROUGH QOOO VOCAL TECHNIQUE 10 
years European operatic experierice. Eastman 
Gale 310-470-6549. 



6600 

Personal Sen/ices 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

CoitiQnkwra l ff D i wr t a Bon ^ <ii U i x < 
ThMM. Pap«r*. and Pwwnil ^lamwm 

rinwmli and Booka 

Infmatonai^ audan ti Waioonw. SkKie 1966 

Stiaron Baar, Ph.D. 

www.Bear-Wrlte.com 
(310) 470-6662 



6700 

Professional Seivices 



EL SEGUNDO company iooking kx part-time, 
flexible hours, experienced administrator. 
Must be familiar with MS2000 server, MSSQL, 
MSExchange, Web/»4ail server, MS-XP40f- 
tice Manage txoadband interr>et/lntrar>et net- 
work for 20* users. KrK>wledge of hardware 
troubieshootir)g experierK:e a must. E-mail re- 
sume arKJ references: Jor- 
danlwaadelphia.net. 

MEDICAUDENTAL 

SCHOOL PERSONAL 

STATEMENTS 

AND ESSAYS Consulting. Wnting. Editing 
Creative expertise. Also resumes, cover let- 
ters, dissertatkKi kxmatting. Credit Cards. Ace 
Words, Etc. 310-820-8830 



NIGHT OWL 

Research, Editing, Wnting. OPEN 24*7. 
Firiest quality at reasoruible rates. Interna- 
tkN>al students wekx>me. Cal Ron at 310- 
572-6600. 



7000 

Tutoriiiy Offeied 



AAA TUTOR'S CLUB 

HOME TUTORING for students Pre/K-12. All 
Academic Sut}tect8, inckiding Foreign Lan- 
guagaa and Computer Training. Cal:31 0-234- 
0101 or ¥i««»r««r. TheTutorsClub.com 

FOREIGN ACCENT REDUCTION. Communn 
cate with darity&accuracy. Especially recom- 
mended for foreign T.A's&graduates entering 
business workj. Taught by experienced profes- 
sors. 310-226-2996. www.accurateen- 
glsh.com. 



^ 7000 

HMoring Offered 



MELANIE'S MASTERS: 

AFFORDABLE 

TUTORING 

AN ages-sut)jects English. Math, Foreign Lan- 
guage, Computer, Standardized tests, sports. 
Arts&Crafts, piano/vk)lin/guttar, singing! 
Babysitting. 310-442-9565. 

MY-TUTOR.COM Math/Physics/Statis- 

tics/English/Hebrew, chemistry/biology, 
Econ/Accountir>g, &Frerx;h, Computer pro- 
gramming. Computerized statistical analysis 
available. Tutorir>g servkM. CaN anytime. 800- 
90-TUTOR. 

PREMIERE TUTORING 

Prwnlum private tutoring for the LSAT, GMAT, 
& GRE. Intense preparatfon, reasonable rates. 
Cal 323-660-4132 or www.premieretutor.com 

UCLA PROF TUTOR 

MATH TUTOR. Afl Levels of Math. UChk^ago 
PhD, Assistant Professor at UCLA. Winner of 
teaching award. Call Paul: 310-387-7796. 

WRITING TUTOR 

Kirxf and patient Stanford graduate. Help with 
tt>e English language— for students of all 
ages/tevels. 310-440-3118. 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



^ 



^^ 7300 

Writing Help 



NEED WRITING HELP? 

WE HELP YOU WRITE WHAT YOU WANT 
TO SAY! EXPERT EDITING! Theses, Dis- 
aertatfom. Essays, Personal Statenr)ents, 
Manuscripts. lnterr>ationai students wel- 
come. 8 1 8-345- 1 53 1 . 



TEACHER/PROVIDER 
POSITIONS 

Special Ed/RSP Teacher 

FT/PT $45/hr+ DOE 

$ 1 000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Speech/Lang. Therapist 

FT/PT $11 0/hr 

$3000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Secondary Single-Subject 

Credentialed Teachers 

Subjects: Math or Science 

or Lang. Arts 

$45/hr DOE FT/PT 



NIGHT OWL 

Raaearch. Editing, Writing. OPEN 24-7. 
Rnest quality at reasonable rates Intema- 
tfonal students wreteome. CaH Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 




Positions are located in/aroimd 
the So. California Region 
Please fax your resume to 

909-335-7195 

Attn: Jennifer Langford 

www.gorman]cxom 



W700 

Child Care Wanted 



BABYSPFTER WHO LOVES KIDS: Own car. 3 
girls ages 2,8,12. Santa Monk:a area. Wee- 
kends/nights. Cheryl 310-393-9297. 

GOVERNESS/TUTOR 

LOOKING for reliable, smart, mature lady to 
work as a goverrwssAutor. Great environment. 
Great benefits. Must be able to travel all over 
tt>e worW. Pay negotiable. 310-842-6226. 

MOTHER'S HELPER! 6,4,1-year okl. Even- 
ings and/or weekends. Must swim, chiW ex- 
perience. Elizabeth 310-558-3229. 



7600 

OmA Cmm ottered 



AFFORDABLE 
CHILD CARE 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL nin by 
UCLA grads. Ages 2.5/6years. Two large play- 
yards. Open year-round 7:30-5:30. Cfose to 
UCLA. 310-473-0772. 

CHILD CARE OFFERED with exceltent refer- 
erKes and fots of fove Flexible. 310-657- 
4588. CalJudy. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our cir- 
culars. For info cal 203-977-1720. 

$300/DAY POTENTIAL 
BARTENDING 

Wil train. Cal:866-291 -1884x440. 

•MOVIE EXTRA WORK* Beats afl jobs. Start 
immediately. Great pay. Fun/Easy. 1^ crazy 
fees. Program for free medk^l CaH-24/hrs 
323-850-4417. 



ANNOUNCERS, no exper1er>ce necessary. 
Host musicAalk-shows for our radkj statkxis. 
P/T. $10-15A>r. $200+per/show, phiS fantastk: 
benefits. 323-468-0080, 24-hours. 

ASAP MOVIE EXTRA WORK: Al types need- 
ed. Work on musk>vkJeos, motk)n-pk:tures, 
TV oommerctais. PT/FT. Make up to $500/day. 
Cal 24hrs. 323-960-5216. 



^Wboo 

Career Opportunities 



Career Opportunities 



7800 

Help Wanted 





=^'^=^^'''-"'^=^' 



• Earn $100-$200 a day 

• 2 wwsic trakilng & Job 

Placement tncludeO 

• It's not a )ob -rt's a PARTY!!! 



National Bartenders School 



1 (SOO) 646 • IVIIXX (6499) 

xA/ww n.-»ti<>n.-ill>.Trtoiiclor-.^.co»ii 



BARTENDERS NEEDED; Earn up to $250 
per/night. No experience necessary. 866-291- 
1884 ext 435 

BARTENDING 

$250 A DAY POTENTIAL. Training provkJed. 
1-800-293-3985 extSIO. 

CASH PAID DAILY 

$10-$15/HR. PT. Gay artist seeks totally 
clean-shaven male under 22 for figure model- 
ing etc. Inexperienced preferred. DannyOBIB- 
980-1666. 



CASHIERS 
$10-$14/HOUR 

LOOKING FOR HIGH ENERGY CASH- 
IERS for focal qufok servfoe restaurant. CaH 
818-755-7789 ask for Patty. 



CLERK: TIRED OF SCHOOL? BH Law Finn 
needs dependable derks. Experierx^e tf)e le- 
gal worW. 30hr/wk. $7.50/hr. Fax Resume to: 
310-274-2798. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE/SALES ASSOCIATE 
Great-student-job. P/T-Flexible hours. Hourty 
plus bonus. Computer skills/bilingual en espa- 
rto! a plus. Westwood Village InsurzirKC Agen- 
cy across from Rite-Aid. UCLA students who 
have finished Freshman/Sophmore year only! 
Call Pat:31 0-208-71 83 

FEMALE FIGURE 

Or life drawir>g models wanted by photogra- 
pher. Call Peter at 310-558-4221. 

FILE CLERK 

$8/hr. F/T and P/T, flexible hrs. Near West LA. 
Fax resume 323-938-5827. 

""FILE CLERK NEEDED 

West LA law firm seeks P/T file clerk. Deperxl- 
able, detail-oriented. $11 /hr. 20-30hrs/wk. 
Permanent P/T. Fax resume 310-838-7700. 

FINANCIAL INTERNSHIP: Growing Financial 
firm needs help. Flexible hours. Base pay w/ 
incentives. 310-546-1560. 

FRENCH CAFE RESTAURANT. WLA." P/T 
cashier, server, arxi delivery. $200 cash/wk. 
No experience needed. Drivers license. 11am- 
4pm, M-R Steve 310-383-9666. 

GENERAL OFFICE WORK in Beverly Hills 
law office. Mon-Fri 1-5:30. $8/hr. Call 310-273- 
3151. 

HELP WANTED: Busy professional is seeking 
an assistant to run errarxls and administer 
househokJ duties (organize bills, meet repair 
people, etc). House is kx^ated off larchmont 
ViNage in Hancock park. Need five to ten 
hours per week (on occasfon up to fifteen). 
Flexit)le hours (perfect for a student or part 
time worker) arxJ competitive pay. Must have 
car. Please include name, contact information 
emd any other relevant (experience etc) to 
ckran>er01 @attt)i.com. 

HOUSEHOLD HELPi Dinner help, laundry, 
make bed. $8-10/hr. IDmin from UCLA. Even- 
ings. 1-2hrs/day. Contact Nancy: 310-476- 
4205 

HOUSEKEEPER/HOME-OFFICE ASSIS- 
TANT for busy doctor. Weekends. Laun- 
dry/cleaning, assist w/cooking, etc. No skiHs 
required. Great pay! Flexible schedule. Leave 
message:31 0-967-51 80. 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

WEST WILSHIRE MEDICAL GROUP is a 
busy neurotogy medk^l office have the foltow- 
ing Full-Time positions open for immediate 
conskleration. Front Desk. Physk:al Therapy 
Assistant, Physkaan's Assistant, transcnption- 
ist, Ultrasound technk:ian. X-ray technician 
and medk:al t)iller. Requirements, experience 
necessary, muli-t£isk person required, de- 
pendable, purx^tual, computer literate, and 
team player. Fax resume :3 10-479-4220, or 
email: asak»@ earthlink.net 

MODELS WANTED by professfonal photo stu- 
dfo for upcoming assignments. Male/female, 
pro/r)on-pro. Cal for an appt 818-986-7933. 

NATIONAL MODEL SEARCH discovering new 
faces arxJ talenti Free auditions! For upcoming 
TV shows! Cal 310-360-1240 or 310-360- 
6992. 

OFFICER MAI^GER. Wtl train to manage of- 
ftee. Computer knowledge. M-F. 30-40hrs/wk. 
Salary+Benefits. 310-476-4205. 





First Call 
Staffing 

Temporary & 
Direct Hire Positions 



• ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

• ACCOUNTING CLERKS 

• DATA ENTRY 

• RECEPTIONIST 

• LIGHT INDUSTRIAL 

We offer an excellent benefit paclioge to our employees 

GlendalG Santa Monfca 

8I8»242»QQ8S 3 I 0*264 •9Q I -4 

www/.ff rstcallstaff.com 



^ I Display 

^^^^i| 206-3060 



24 



THE OAJLY B8UIN - ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



CLASSIFIED 



F 



1 




i 



V 



^H^5*-*"'> 



Apartments for Rout 



^^^^MA.,^^mm S400 

Apartiiionts for Rent 



^PSf^ 



Apartments for RcMit 



Whathit? 



ucIq Ashe Center 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Iron hook 

5 Mi^or Hoopie's 

vMOrd 
9 — Dipper 

12 Egg-shaped 

13 PonytaH sites 

15 Satquatch cousin 

16 TVdo¥^ 

17 Shine 

16 All-purpose trucks 
19 Physics topic 
21 BulwarK 

23 Charged partides 

24 Rim 

25 HokJ gently 
28 Naive 

33 Aboveboard 

34 Paper toy 

35 Prtcher 

36 Here, for moriiieur 

37 To date (2 vm») 

38 standstill 

39 Rumir^ate 

41 Siat 

42 Taboos (hyph ) 
44 Unlawful entries 

(hyph.) 

46 Lighter fluid 

47 Felt boot 

48 Em, to Dorothy 
48 Stylish beard 
53 Defy orders 

57 Spicy stew —•-•«- 

58 Letter by modem 
(hyph) 

60 Tot's cry 

61 Chicken morsel 

62 Peeved 

63 Styptic 

64 Fern, saint 

65 Frat tetters 

66 QangbiMler 
Elwt- 

DOWN 

1 high deeert of 



PREVICXJS PUZZLE SOLVED 




S-24-02 D 2002 UniMd FMtur* Syndc«M Inc 



Asia 

Bard's river 

Take aback 

Keys locale 

Motor 

Furxlraisers, 

sometimes 

Gorilla 

Darling 

H»a after alpha 

Cato's road 

Main point 

14 More petite 

15 Affluent one 
r ee 

Wire measure 
Take the stairs 
Happen again 
Spry 
Freebiet 
Provo's state 
Safari leader 
Drop a hint (2 
vwds.) 



2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
^8 

9 
10 
11 



20 
22 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



32 Backspace, on 

aPC 
34 Zen rkldle 



37 
40 



43 
45 



Raincoat 
Pake, for one 
(2yMd8.) 

42 Cell habitants 
Hassock 
RfBund Table 
knigh? 

46 Constructs 

48 Farewell 

49 Oaths 

50 Found a perch 

51 Three squared 

52 Discharge 

54 Cotton unit 

55 Ostrich cousins 

56 Edible roots 
59 Ra. noightKX 





S27Si540mkMtBA}m. 



C(Hulowiniuw-Qualit\ 

APARTMENTS 

ni ih( III (in i>i \\( Mwmul \ill(t-ji ' 



(310) 208-0064, 208-4868 




Free T-1 Intemet access 
Study Lounge with computers 
Fulty^equped fitness center 
Pod, saur^ spa & recreation area 
Heat/ AC, refrigerator, microwave, 
stove, dishwasher 
Bakxyiy or pabo & firepiaoe 
Studk). 1 & 2 Bedrooms .4*: 



Exceptional Value! 



(310)824-7409 



430IMonAye. 

•DSL Ready 

• Flooftop spa & recreation area 
•Heat/AC, refngeratTr, microwave, 

stove, dshwasher 

• Bakxny or patio & fireplaoe 
•1&2Bedroonis 




(310)824-0463 



1030 Ihmrton Aye, 

-DSL ready 

• Fuly-equiped fitness center 

■ Rooftop sundeck & recreaiicn area 

• Sauna, outdoor spa & barbecue 
•Heat/ AC, refrigerator. 

stove, dshwasher 

• Bakxny bey window, firepiaoes 
•Studto/^Onty 




Just minutes from 



Cawpus Rcsluurants Theatres Shops 



8300 

Voluntoer 



VOLUNTEERING 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES available at 
youth hostel in Santa Monica. Meet interna- 
tional travelers. Gain job skills. Lucy 310-393- 
9913x18. 




^ housing 

8400-9800 



8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



1+1 UPPER 

NEW FLOORS. >JEW ^LINDS, IfWgerator, 
stove, waM-to-waJI dosats. paiSdr)% anti laun- 
dry $995/mo. Bike or bus to UCLA. 310-477- 
0725 

1 -MINUTE TO UCLA 

Studio, furnished, clean, secunty entrarx^e. 
separate kitchen, laundry room, pool, lyr 
$850Mio. 310-824-1830. 



^> APARTIEHT 



Get One-on-One Assistance 
Bosed on: Area, Amenity, 
* of Bedrooms, Prke, Ret 

9 OOO'f ^ 
« Vacancies 4 

Aportments, Condos, Duplexes, 

Hbuses, 3,000^ PKotos A Virtual 

Walk-Throughs 

90 Pay Web Access! 

• FREE ' 

• FREE 

• FREE 

• FREE 

www.apqrtmenthunterz.com 
310-276-HOMf .«>' 1 ««»»>«'♦**" 

(4663) Blvd., Beverly Hills 
Landlords Us* For free! 






7800 

Help Waiit(!(i 



P/T MAIL SORTER 

LATE-MORNINGS MAM. SORTER for private 
Mail Center Easy job arxj good pay in a re- 
laxed environment. 310-640-2761. 



^^ 7800 

tf^ Wanted 



PART-TIME OFFICE ASSISTANT. 
CPA/Buainess ManagenDent firm seeks part- 
time ■■■iaIWTt to he^ with phones. fMNng and 
general office duties. Fax Resume: 310-207- 
1782. 

PART-TIME TYPIST: West LA Lkm Firm. 20- 
30hrs/wK. Transcribing tapes. 
654^i«>rd8/minute. Permanent P/T. Fax re- 
suffw 310-8 36-7700 

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Westwood Vil- 
lage production company hiring student PA. 
Camera. Editing, Submisstons, Errands. 
Clean dnving record a must. LICLA Students 
who have completed Freshman/Sophmore 
year only. Can P athd(:3 10-206-7183. 

PT/FT. DATA ENTRY. Must have computer 
knowledge/siull. In Westwood. very ciose to 
UCLA. Ca« 310-91 4-9150 or 310-710-2531 

RECEPTIONIST WESTWOOD LAW OFFIC- 
ES. Mon-Fn. 9-5 $8AK)ur. Can do homework 
ontob. 310- 475-4931. 

RETAIL CASHIER PT for b«ke shop. Apply I 
Martin Inc 8330 Beverly Blvd. (4-t)locks east 
Beverly Center) 



RETAIL SALES 

PT/FT. Sepulveda 9lvd n««»5ner wed- 
ding/svening gowns. Experience preferred, 
motivaled and frlerxMy. Great opportunity. Sal- 
ary/conwni8Sions/t>onu8es. Excellent $$.310- 
474-7 806 Pauline. ^^^ 

THIRD YEAR LAW STUDENT WANTED Ass- 
ist in connection w/elder abuse litigation arxJ 
legal research m a number of substantive ar- 
eas. IShrs/wK. Salary open. Send resun^e: 
Sheldon Rubin. Esq. Rubin. Eagan & Kane. 
LLP Fax 310-786-0964. phone 310-788-0963. 

VOICE-OVER TALENTS NEEDED Male/fe- 
male between ages 18-30 Send resume: Zol- 
tan. 415 HeroTKlo St, hiemtosa Beach. CA 
90254 ^^ 

WANTED: 29 people to lose weight. Earn $$$ 
for the pounds arxj irKhes you lose. Safe. 
Doctor recommended 800-296-0477 www.lo- 
seMkemagic.com 



mSOOO 

nternships 



$8% $625 I 
10809 "^Lndhnook <D/t. 

can be ^uArtisfccd ai no 
addUlonaf cfca^ge. 
CoM (910) 208-1664 






■:M(*-*-at4*a.*-Af!*-:^'M!t*^K «*»' 



BACHELOR. 5 min from UCLA. Prtvato. 
brtght. large room w/full bath, waik-in closet, 
utilities included, cable, laundry facilities, 
new paint $690 Available Now: 310-470- 
3740. 



INTERNSHIP w/award-winning, syrnlicated 
joumaJist/screenwrrter PC literate, college 
credit-«-pay Expenence, references, and 
contacts! Please contact Beverly at 3 10- 
381-1957 or email: malwnte@aol.com 



BEAUTIFUL LUXURY APARTMENT furnished 
own room/own bath Cable, kitchen privileges. 
7mins to UCLA. Very comfortable atnx)sphere. 
Female only. $580/month. 310-450-3585. 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1 .2&3BEDROOM. 
$925AUP LARGE. UNUSUAL CHARM. 
SOME SPANISH STYLE W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS. ONLY HALF BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS. 310-839-6294. 

BRENTWOOD ADJCNT $1195-$1775. 1- 
t>drms/2-bdrms/2-baths. Newly Decorated, 
Quiet building. Built-in/Bookcase/Center. 
Light, w/view, X-Large. Patios&Parking. 
UCLA/1 0-min. No Pets, Faculaty/Stafl/Grads. 
1-yrlease 310-453-5000. 310-236-2222. 

BRENTWOOD Minutes from UCLA, luxurious 
h«gh-nse w/deluxe appointments and t>reath- 
taking views. Olympic size pool arxl new fit- 
ness center /Vpartments from $1200/month. 
Bamngton Plaza 310-478-3000. 



8400 

ApnrtinoMts for Rent 



BRENT MANOR 
APIS 

Avoid Westwood 

rents 
1 mile to UCLA 

Singles 

1&2 Bedrooms 

Pool, Near bus line 

1235 Federal 

■ (510) 477-7257, 



CASA OPHIR 

IBDRM/IBTH starting $1250. 2bdnn/2bth 
$2100. Luxury apartmerrts, five minute 
walk to UCLA. Fridge, dishwasher, 
microwave, laundry room, parking, bakx>ny. 
NO PETS. 11088 Ophir. Eric:31 0-208- 
8881. 



GUESTHOUSE 

In t>eautiful Westwood home. Studk) w/full 

bath kitchen, living room Upstairs bedrpom 

k)ft. Unfurnished. $1150/mth indu&lpg alfutil- 
itos arxl premium cable. AvailabI* 06/03/02. 
SuiTvner or 1year lease ok. Call:31 0-474- 
2706. 

LUXURY ^PTS. 1&2bedrooms. Newly reno- 
vated. Westwood. Hardwood fkx)rs, aown 
mokjings, k)ts of light. Will consider pet. 
AC/new appliances. $1490-2640. 310-475- 
9311. 

MAR VISTA. UNFURNISHED. $796. 
1bdrm/1bth. Upper, gated, stove, fridge, 1- 
year-lease. Clean! http7/LArents.home.at- 
tbi.com. 310-202-6019. 

MARINA MOVE-IN 
SPECIAL 

Spacious new studk)s- 1.2,3txjrms. T-l Inter- 
net, fridge. microwave. A/C, 
pool/spa/gym/sauna, business center, con- 
cierge. Chateau Marina/Fiji Villas. 310-827- 
3992. 

OWN BEDROOM/BATH in Spanish Duplex in 
BH adjacent. $775/n>onth. Light and bright, 
hardwood fkxKS. Availat)le now. Short or k>ng 
temri. 310-859-7403. 



JT 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APIS 

Large, Clean 
Singles & 1 Bedrooms 

Across the Street from 

UCLA 

Walk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



=15 



PALMS $1250 

Upper, quiet, 2-f2, tMdcony, /K/C, fireplace, sky- 
light, all amenities. 2-car gated paridng. laun- 
dry, bos connection UCLA. 10718 Lawler St. 
1-3pm. 310-390-5996. 

PALMS. 1bdrm/1bth. $950. Beautiful large apt. 
10 min from UCLA. New berber carpeting. 
New appliances. A/C. Huge ck>sets. 
Bright&clean. 310-273-7596. 

PALMS. Single apt from $600. 1-bdmn $700, 
$600/$700deposit. 1-year lease. Stove, re- 
frig. carpets, vert, blinds. 310-837-1502 LM, 
8am-5pm. 

PRIME WEST LA LOCATION NEAR UCLA! 
2txjrm/1 .5bth. Freshly painted, new carpets, 
ceramic tiled kitchen. 1 -year-lease. 
$1250/nrK)nth. 310-473-9916. 

PRIVATE 3bdrm/2bth spack)us upper w/bakx>- 
ny. Near SM Blvd & Westwood. All new. 
$2100/month. 310-473-9916. 



Casablanca West 



1 Bedrooms from $1095 



•ind lip 



Available July V 



'Sii*MS(^= 



fHpW 

530 Veteran 
208-4394 



8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



Diamond H«ad 
Apartments 

Reserve Apartment for next schooi year. 

Rem starts Jutyr 

SInsle $1045 

Sinsle w/loft & 
1 tiedroonn $1265-1395 

Sbedroom & 1 bedroorn 
v«^/Toft $1755 

2bedroom w/loft $21 75 

NintMn walklns distance to UCLA. Gated 
Parkins. Jacuzzi. Sauna, Rec room, 

Laundry facilities, Ac/Refrtgerator, Stove. 
Short term avail . Summer discount 

660 Veteran 
208-2251 



SANTA MONICA PANORAMIC OCEAN- 
VIEW. Itxirm fumished apartment $2000- 
$2300. Luxury 2-t-l bedroom, fumished $3500. 
Assigned parldng. Walk to 3rd Street Prome- 
nade&Pier. 310-399-3472. 

SANTA MONICA. Single. $895. Quiet building. 
Close to market/bus. 1234 14th street, off 
Wilshire. 5 miles from UCLA. 310-471-7073. 

SANTA MONICA. VERY LARGE 2bdrm/1bth. 
$1950. Quiet buikjing, 2-parking, private t>al- 
cony. Close to market/bus. 1234 14th street, 
off Wilshire. 310-471-7073. 



SHERMAN OAKS ADJ 

$795-1 bdrm. $950-2txlrm. Garden apts. Ceil- 
ing fans, >V/C. imn^aculate, parking, half block 
from UCLA bus and shopping. 818-399-9610. 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 
No Pets 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 

Near Glenrock 



WALK TO UCLA, 
WESTWOOD 

SINGLE($1095+). 1+1($1350+). 

2-t-l ($19504-), 2-»-2($2390 •«-) gated garage, 
pool, walk-in ck>set, laundry, recreatkin 
room, Jacuzzi, www.keltontowers.com 310- 
206-1976 



WEST LA. $1500. Huge, bright front. 
3bdrm/1.5 ba. Completely remodeled, dish- 
washer, patk), 2 car parking, near UCLA. No 
pets. 310-670-5119. 

WEST LA/PALMS. Brand new townhouses. 
Furnished/unfurnished. Gorgeous. Luxury. 
Washer/dryer in unit. Designer finishes. 
3+2.5- $1895-2495. 310-278-8999. 

WEST LA: 2BDRM/1.5BTH. Stove, Refrigera- 
tor, Laundry, 2 Car Parking, Quiet Neighbor- 
hood. 2 miles to UCLA. $1395. 310-829-0385. 









2BD-I-2BA $1395.00 

GATED GARAGE INTEICOM ENTRYM UNIT 

2884SAWrEiE BLVD 

(310)391-1076 

Mr(3]0149<M109 
.wtit» H tp l e<tt.c— 



www 



^ 



Westwood Village 

433 Kelton Ave. 
(310) 208-8685 

1 Bedroom from $1235 

Extra large luxury units include: 

• Fully equipped kitchen 

• Central heating and air 

• Extra closet space 

• Wetbar in selected units 

• Private balcony 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 



^ 



'with 1 year lease 

Professionally managed by 

Integrated Property Services, Inc 



^ 



8400 

ApartaiciUs for Rrrnl 



WESTWOOD 
PLAZA 



Studios $1100-1200 

1 bedroom.$1 350- 1600 

Summer discount ivailable. 
Call for details 

rarkitig AvaRaile. 
WaHctfig iHstmK^ to %mipus. 

310-208-%05 



WESTWOOD 

1BDRM UPPER: Steps from UCjV. Bright, 
good closets, kitchen appliar>ces, l£<ndry, out- 
door BBQ, 2-car parldng. Availale 09A)2. 
$1350, 310-234-8278. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE. MID VALE N. OF 
LEVERING. LARGE 1 AND 2BDR^ APTS, 
GARDEN VIEW, DINING ROOM. UliQUE, 
CHARM. FRONT&REAR ENTRANCl UP- 
PER, ALSO LOWER APT W/HARDVOOD 
FLOORS+PATKD. 310-839-6294. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE. ItKlrms $1«o- 
$1550. 2t)drms $1800-2250. 1-yr lease. Pek- 
ing, laurxlry. No pets. 310-471-7073. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE: Large 1lxlrm/1l)^ 
Townhouse. $1600. Hardwood floors, fire 
plaqe, dining room, parking, laundry. 1yr lease. 
Available 8/15/02. No pets. 925 Gayley. 310- 
471-7073. 

WESTWOOD. 2t)drTn/1bth. $1650. 1 block 
from UCLA in best tocation. Includes 2 parking 
spaces&all utilities. Start July 1st 310-273- 
7598. 

WESTWOOD. 2BDRM/2BATH. $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN, STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM. HIGH CEILING. CHARM. 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE. SOME W/BALCONY. 
310-839-6294. 

WESTWOOD. Walk UCLA. 2bdrm/2bth, gated 
parking, rooftop spa, quiet buikling, accepting 
reservatkXYS for Summer/Fall. $2075 arxl up. 
512 Veteran. 310-208-2655. 

WESTWOOD: Large 2bdrm/2bth. Walk to 
UCLA. 2 parking spots. Pool arxJ Jacuzzi. 
Starting July. $1800-$1900. 310-824-0833 



/^ 



WEnWOOD VILLAGE 
691 LEVERING AVENUE 

Very large apartments For July 1 st ocaiparKV- 
ControUed occess, courtvord building tuith 

pool, elevotor, subeenonean porting BuiIMn 

kitchens, large pocios or bolcootes Some 

appartmerxs lulth o Hrepioce. 

IBR/lbath $1,300 

2BR/1 bath $1 ,800 

2BR/2bath $2,300 

For pre-apf>lications visit us at 

www.leveringheights.com 

or call Mon.-Fri. 9/^-4PM 

(310) 208-3647 



Jt 



WLA/PALMS 

BACHELORS/SINGLES- FumishedAinfur- 

nished. some w/poo(, gated, kitchen, $795 
-4mp. ibdrm i»60-\2S& mm¥f w^m^l mm , 
luxury and more. 2bdmn $1150-1645, many 
wMishwashers, bakxxiy, A^ and more. Must 
see. Call for free listing :3 10-278-8999. 



WLA:$710&up. Move-in special Attractive sin- 
gles. Near UCLA/VA. Ideal for student. Suit- 
at>le for two. Definite must see! 1525 Sawtelle 
Blvd. 310-477-4832. 



m 



* PALMS * 



2BD. 2BATOWNHOME, FP, CENTRAL, AM/ 
HEAT, GATED GARAGE. SEC. ALARM, CAT OK 

3614 PARIS OR. $1298/MO 

ON-SrrE MGa (31CI)e37-OQ06 

4B0, 3BA ♦ LOFT TOWNMOME, FP, CBiTRAL 

AtR/HEAT, GATED OARAQE. SEC ALARM. 

CAT OK 

3640 WESTWOOD BLVD. $2a66/MO 
3670 MIDVALE AVE. S2306/MO 



* MAR VISTA * 



380. 38ATOWNHOME, FP. CEKTML MV 
HEAT, GATED GARAGE, SEC. ALARM. CAT OK 

12741 MTTCHELL AVE. SlOOS/MO 

2BDt2BA TOWNHOMES 
11931 AVON WAY. $1245/MO. 



11748 COURTLEIGH DR. 
12741 MITCHBl AVE. 
12736 CASWBl AVE. 



$1245/MO. 
$1245/MO. 
$1245/MO. 



Open House Mon-Sat 10-4 PM 
(310)391-1076 



com 



^ 8600 

Condo/Townhouse for Rent 



1540 ARMACOST.FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
share spacious 2bdrm/2.5ba condo. Fur- 
nished, washer/dryer, gated parking. $975/nDO 
■t^talf Utilities. 310-457-5523. 

PRIME BRENTWOOD 
CONDO 

1bdrm/2bth Condo. $1200. 1yr lease. No pets. 
Dishwasher, wood floors, refrigerator, stove, 
pool/)acuzzi, laundry, weight room, gated park- 
ing. 31(W70-1757. 



Condo/Townhouse for Sale 



CONDO FOR SALE 

SHERMAN OAKS. 2+2 CONDO by owner, 
spacious, many ctosets, 2-partdng spaces, 
near Beverly Glen, $300,000. Move-in condl- 
tion.81 8-78 9-3596. 

IMAGINE OWNING WILSH*E CorrkJor/HI- 
Rise single, 1or2bdnTi $150K-$325K. Walk to- 
UCLA/Village, 24hr/securi1y. Spectacular 
views, pool, spa, sauna, valet-service. Agent- 
Bob 31 0-478- 1835ext. 109. 



WESTWOOD on Veteran. Ibdrm/lbth. 
Large private patk), hardwood fkxxs, A/C, 
W/D in unit. $259,000. Pool, spa. and gym. 
Myron 310-454-9493. 



8800 

Guesthouse for Rent 



GUESTHOUSE FOR RENT; WILSHIREAA 
CIENEGA AREA. Nk» Guest house $700/nx) 
including utilities. 323-936-7119. 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



Display 
20(.-3060 



8900 

Hoiiso for R(Mi( 



PALMS 30drm/1bth charming hous« 
$1990AT)onth. Large yard, firaplaca, garage. 
near Mua-Nrw. 3700 Westwood 949-581- 

saeo. 



9400 

Room foi K(?nt 



"mi for Help 



EXCHANGE PRIVATE ROOM. BATH. 
BOARD. Car arKl S600/mo for Caregiv- 
ingA^ousakeeptng servioes for Female Atc- 
heimars Paciant IMuat be deperxtebto. loving. 
Nor>«TK)kar. Start July lat. Hours RexMe. 
Sundays off. Lee 323-931-3277 



TRY SOMETHING NEW IN FALL 2002! 
Rooms avaUable in friendly bowding house 
on Hilgard Ave $798/month (2/room); 
$705 50/month (3/room); $682/month 
(SAoom) incKidaa uWWaa. catM TV. and 15 
mealsAwaak. Female UCLA sludanla only. 
310-208-5056 




WEST LA. PartaKy furnished room to rent. 
Bathroom/shO¥wer. No kitchen privileges. 
Cable and phone hookup. Street paiMng. 
Laundry $800. 310-079-8595 



BRENTWOOD ViU_AQE. 1 iwye bedroom, 
tetophona jack, cable TV iack. Famaia tludant 
prefarred-daan, naal. Quiet building. 
$560ATwnth I electri ci ly 310-820-7378. 

BRENTWOOD. 2.5 MILES FROM CAMPUS. 
Lovely home. Clean room with carpaMilnds. 
U nra a H M a d pahdng. Privale room^enfrance. 
share batfi. $560. 31(M72-7451. 

BRENTWOOD Attractive, quiet home Fur- 
niahed huge privale bath. Wood floors. Cable. 
frtdgaAntcrowava. I.SmNes UCLA Nav bus. 
Avalabie July 15. 310^72-4419. 

CSNTURY CITY ROOM. 15-MkHJtes from 
UCLA. $400-$700. utHWes included. Fur- 
mtfwd. Prtvala ankanoa. No smokinf^drink- 
ino^nigsAMts. UHMaa-lnckidad. Mala pre- 
ferred. Honest people. 310-838-6547. 

HILGARD AND SUNSET. Bright, cozy 
roomAMrihroom. privale entrance. utiiWes In- 
ckxled. cable-TV. $e0QAnonlh. available 6^23. 
Parking, relridgef a toc M iterow a ve . no kitchen 
p rivtega s . No smoking. 310-470-2865/310- 
47^«401. > 

MAR VISTA. Privaia badroom^Mlh in new ar- 
ch Ua cturs iy d esi gn ed home. Kitchen, laundry 
prkH^iM. clrt»ae» ay parking, short or tong- 
lami. UHMaa/caMe induded. Bavwty 310- 
391-1957 

PALMS- 2 privaie bedroom s , shared bath- 
room, privale W^, 1 privale gvaga-pwWng. 

new. never Ivad in kjwnhome. early August 
$1(XXVmonih. Lany 714-394-4877. 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH in beautiful home 
near UCLA, kimiahad. kitehen. laundry privi- 
legaa. uMiaa, cable mckided. Responattile 
mah student pratane d . References neces- 
sary. $66(Mnth. 31(M77-e077. Cm necee- 



WESTWOOD 

VERY SPACIOUS ATTRACTIVE 380RM Up- 
per Quiet raskjentia l street. Laundry, parking. 
$2400. Available MM August 310-234-8278. 

WESTWOOD Private bedroom/balh. Laun- 
dry. A/C. ful-kllchen. hardwood-fkxxs, ftre- 
plMe. Safe. No pets Stor^je. near bkjebus. 
$650 Available now 310-470^)227 



9500 

Rooininnlrs-Piivnti? Room 



ASIAN/CAUCASION mito couple with bache- 
lor room. mini- kJ tdianaHe, privale entrwKa. 
15min. UCLA $625Aitmties. 323-868-7977 
day. 323-656-3554 

BRENTWOOD 

TOWN HOME To sh»e. M^e/Femito. Non- 
smoker. Graduate. fKXjMy prafanad. Privale 
bdrm & bth. AAC. waahar/dryar in unit. 
$750ATith. 310-820-8354. 

BRENTWOOD, LARGE SUNNY 2bdnTV2blh 
apartment. Al-amenitias. Parking. Kitr^hen 
privilegea. Ctoaa to Tranaportabon. Studania 
Wetoome. A v aiabls IV 1 . Plaaae cal before 
8pm: 310-826-1970. 

LARGE FUay PUNISHED BEDROOM piij» 
bath in 2-f2 apartment in Brentwood Gated 
parking. patto. quiet neighborhood. 
$775/mo.-f$775 DapoaM. Month-to-Month. 
Available 7/18. 310-753-9193. 

WEST HOLLYWOOD. Spactous 2bdnTV2balh. 
Ctoaa to UCLA. Qraal vaa. quiet . $766Ano 
inckjdaa ulMaa. $828.75 dapoall. Avaitt)ie 
immedh<sf». Amanda: 310-563-8302. 



9600 

-Sh.nrod RcxHTT 



ROOM-hLQ. WRKSPACE 

Privale room, share baih in 2bdmV1bth house. 
pkift own 19'xl4 wortcspaoa/naraga^gar- 
dar^^alto. W/D. no pats, avaiabis nowl 
$80IVyno. toduding utiMies. 310-838-8522. 



^ 1800 

Misceilaiicoiis 



FEMALE STUOEI^ TO SHARE Ibdmi/Sving 
room apartment. Gated complex, parking, 
near SMCC. $385Anth. Available now! Ciril 
Heather 310-453-5558. 

WESTWOOD. LOOKING FOR FEMALE 
ROMMATE to share bedroomAMth with UCLA 
student. $500Ano. Available 07/01/02. Elena 
310-824-4792. 



1800 

fVliscf^llancotis 




Pick up a 




0^ C^mp^s 



tOFdnlf^ 




In the student bookstore ^nd look for the white 
Recycler street racks at nearby locations. 



Classifieds 
825- 



CUOSinED 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 - THE DAILY 







$975ATwnth. West LA. 2bdrm/1bth. Duplex. 
Shon-term lease, bright, hardwood floors, dri- 
veway parking. 2585 Sepulveda, 949-581- 
8660 

CHEAP SUBLET. Female to sublet private 
room arxj bath in townhouse. 1 mile from cam- 
pus. Parking and W/D $600obo July&/or Au- 
gust. Rent & dates flexible. 310-626-5856. 

LARGE ROOM AVAILABLE IN LOCAL CL>^- 
SIC(TREEHOUSE) Suitable for One/T*W) 
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•OnENTAHON ISSUE 2002 



-^ 



SPORTS 



Bruins lost 76-0 in first crosstown 



from page M 

house at the Great Western Forum, but they know 
where it's aC their head coach Henry Bibby was a 
star point guard at UCLA from 1969-72 and tried to 
move to Fresno State after a first-round loss in the 
last NCAA tournament 

But back to our history lesson. The Bruins 
freaked again from 1996-1999, winning ten games 
in a row against their crosstown rivals, including a 
1996 game in which they shot .731 from the floor 

The past two years the Bniins have split the 
series. In their first contest last season, the Bniins 
failed to defend and rebound in an 81-77 k)68 at 
the Forum. 

They appeared to be in line for another defeat 
in the Febniary rematch. Having bk)wn an 11- 
boint lead with six minutes left, the Bruins were 
down 65-64 with half a minute to play. They 
missed two shots, but having improved on the 
offensive glass since the Last rivalry game, then- 
senior Dan Gadzuric rebounded and threw the 
ball out to then-senior Billy Knight who sank a 
sweet buzzer-beater to defeat USC 67-65. 

"God's helping us out," Knight said after the 
game "It's like divine intervention or something." 

If only God had intervened on the gridiron as 
well. 

TYus year, the Bruins were shutout 27-0 at the 
Coliseum- Painful? Yes. But not as embarrassing 
as the first ever USC-UCLA football game in 1929 
in which USC abused UCLA 7&4) and followed it 
lip the next year with a 62-0 whipping. 



"Whoever wins has 365 days' bragging rights," 
UCLA football head coach Bob Toledo said. 
"You've got to live in this town, right here togeth- 
er" 

Tlie crosstown aspect makes USC-UCLA differ- 
ent from any other rivalry in the country. So you'll 
be hearing about the 27-0 loss for another 170 or 
so days until Nov. 23. But don't worry. 

"I look forward to getting the winning tradition 
back," redshiri freshman running back Jason 
Harrison said. 

"Winning tradition" may be a bit of a stretch 
since UCLA is 27-37-7 all-time against USC. But 
there is no shame in having a worthy adversary, 
and the quality oi both programs annually makes 
USC-UCLA a nationally noteworthy game. 

When UCLA lost 17-7 in 1999 it was the first 
time since 1941 that both teams went into the 
game under .500. 

"We're always good football teams," Tbledo 
said. "We both recruit out of state more than other 
schools and (our game) is on national TV every 
year" 

Although UCLA is currently looking to snap a 
three-game losing streak, recent history has been 
kind to the Bruinjs. From 1991-1998, overlapping 
the T^rry Donahue and Tbledo eras, UCLA owned 
eight straight victories for the first time in any 
ma^r national college football rivalry. 

This is no religious history course, but nothing 
short of a miracle occurred in Tbledo 's first year in 
1996 when it looked like the streak would be bro- 
ken after 6 years. 



left 



"We were down by 17 with six minutes left and 
won 48-41 in double overtime. That was my most 

Teniorable game," Tbledo said. 
A touchdown set up by a reception by little- 
known Rodney Lee eriabled the game to go into 
overtime. The matchup almost always stars an 
unlikely hero. 

"You've got to forget about what happened that 
season, the records, because that game is differ- 
ent," Tbledo said. 

Favorites matter very little, as evidenced by 
another great comeback: the 1992 game in which 
UCLA trailed by 14 in the fourth quarter. The 
Bruins rallied to take a 3&^1 lead but USC drove 
right back down the field with 41 seconds to play 
for the touchdown. The TVojans went for the 2- 
point conversion but it was blocked by linebacker 
Nkosi Littleton to save the 38-37 Bruin victory. 

I This being just a cheat sheet, we cant go into 
the other great sports in depth, but you should 
know that USC won the infamously unfamous 
Lexus Gauntlet, in this, its inaugural season. TTie 
Gauntlet awards points to the wiimer of each 
head-to-head matchup in all sports. 

The Bruins did, however, narrowly defeat USC 
for their seventh straight Pac-10 title in women's 
track and beat them in the first round of the NCAA 
women's termis tournament 

Of course, the best learning is hands-on. Go to 
a rivalry game, and you will become a living part 
of history. And if' you retain nothing else from 
these Cliff's Notes, just remember, as far as the 
rivalry goes, TVojans SUC. 

-i 



SURF I UCLAs team entered 
nationals with a ^o. 12 rank 



from page M 

hooked." 

For those who canY stray firom 
the waves long, UCLAJs Surf Club is 
comprised of members who simply 
love the sport and who want to 
share this love with each other. TTie 
club is especially helpftil to students 
without cars by organizing carpools 
to the beach as well as day and 
overnight surfing trips. TTie dub is 
open to all levels; many members 
are beginners. 

"Next year there will be three 
(^portunities for camping trips, and 
day trips to get to know other UCLA 
surfers and get a ride to the beach," 
club president Irene Chansawang 
said. 

"We meet two times a month," 
she added "It's a great way to meet 
new people, hang out, go to the 
beach, and eryoy the waves." 

If, however, you've been doing 
aerials since you were able to walk, 
and competing is more your style, 
UCLAs surf team is climbing the 
ranks of other Southern California 
teams to be reckcmed with. TTie 



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team went to the National 
Scholastic Surfing Association's 
state competition for the first time 
in three years, and entered the 
national competition ranked 12th 
oiitof30schocrfs. 

"We have 6 shortboarders, 1 IcMig- 
boarder, 1 female surfer, 1 bocjy- 
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boarding," team captain Brian 
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"We compete in four regular sea- 
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SPORTS 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 • IK ONLY 



27 



PICKUP I The abundance of sporting 
opportunities helps distract from class 



from page W 

the hall and find some other guys in the same 
boati We'd roll downstairs and shoot pool or 
foosball to take our minds oflf school," he said. 

Students often can be really creative. 

"We would play soccer in our hall with rolled 
up socks and the ends of the hallways as goals," 
said second-year Kedar Abhyankar. "It seemed 
like half the floor would play. It would actually 
get pretty hardcore. We stopped alter a while 
becfiuse some people hurt themselves and some 
intense rivalries developed. Fun times though." 

Other than the games students invent on their 
floors, the hill also provides more traditional 
activities. Though Hedrick Hall poses the 
longest most uphill climb, it also boasts the 
bored-student trifecta of pool, ping-pong and 
foosball tables. 

The equipment is defi- 

nitely not the. most well- 
kept; in fact, playing pool 
resembles miniature golf- 
ing in the need to avoid the 
scrapes and bun^)6 of the 
surCsK*e. But, as long as the 
conditions are even for 
both players, one can win 
bngging rights, a definite 
indkntion of competition. 

N^w students should 
definitely bring their high- 
tops because unquestion- 
ably the most popular pick- 
up game on campus is basketball. The hill fea- 
tures three full courts next to Rieber Hall and the 
newly opened Sunset Courts, which have six 
smaller full courts. 

No matter what time of day, the repetitive 
bounce of a ball can be heard on the courts, and 
durliig the late afternoon and early evening the 
courts fill up fast One need not worry about 
bringing teammates because games are always 
seapdimg for one more, and there is no easier 
way to connect with strangers than a pickup baa- 
keCballgame. 

Ey/ea though the msgor sport on the hill is bas- 
ketball, other sports are available Volleyball pits 
are located in fh>nt of Saxon Suites and at 
Sunset Caiyon Recreation Center. Tennis courts 
stand by the Sunset Cany(Hi basketball courts 
and behind the tennis stadium. 



"It is virtually impossible to 
concentrate on school 
when it's hot and the sun is 
Shining, and the hard part 
is. it's like that for most of 
the year." 

BradCalkens 
Second-year student 



Tliere is also an expansive grass field at 
Sunset Canyon perfect for football or throwing 
around a baseball or Frisbee, though students 
have been known to sque€»ze these activities into 
the tight confines in fit)nt of their buildings. 

The opportunities by no means end on the hill 
though, as a virtual mecca of games exists on 
campus at the John Wooden Center 

For the most serious hoopsters, the JWC 
offers the most competitive games, often featur- 
ing former UCLA athletes and even the NBA -ros- 
ter-cut Master P. 

Drop-in volleyball ^r.d badminton have specif- 
ic times during the week. Gynmastics equipment 
is offered to students who can prove to the cer- 
tified instructor their merit Many college stu- 
dents leam and start a passion for racquetball 
and squash, which combine intense activity with 
the letting out of rage and the smashing of balls. 

FiruJly, lost in the action, 

ping-pong and chess are sta- 
ples of the JWC, each with its 
share of regulars. 

While all students admit- 
ted to UCLA are obviously 
dedicated in some way to 
their education, the many 
forms of instant fun accessi- 
ble to students is difficult for 
even the most studious to 
refi'ain from. 

"It is virtually in^p(>ssible 

to concentrate on school 

when it's hot and the sun is 

shiiung, and the hard part is, it's like that for 

most of the year," Calkens said. 

"If you love studying, you should have gone to 
Berkeley where it's always cold and overcast," 
he added 

At UCLA, to attend to their work, students 
must not only overcome their reluctance to 
study, but also remain steadfast in not partici- 
pating in the random games going on all around. 
No matter the time of day or night there wiU 
always be someone up looking for fim and 
tempting students to leave their desks. Pickup 
games relieve stress and break up the process of 
class and hcxnework. 

For as every new Bruin will quickly realize, 
some of the most intcii;^ competition at the best 
sports school in the countiy is not always 
between these wearing UCLA jerseys. 




Daiut Bbun PtLE Photo 

enthusiasts had to turn elsewhere for a field In 2002 as the fonner Intramural Reld was ripped apart for a new parking structure. 

INTRAMURAL | Smaller field limits playing space 



from page m 

However, in the following quarters, a 4- 
on^ flag football tournament will likely 
also be held, due to its popularity. 

Flag football was changed from a 7- 
on-7 format to a 4-on-4 because of ^ace 
restrictions. Last year and this year, the 
sport will be limited to grass space due 
to an underground parking lot that is 
being built under the Intramural Field is. 

"Initially, the response to the switch 
to 4-on-4 was not favorable," DeLuca 
said. "As the year went on, people 
ervjoyed it It's a quicker game, one of 
the reasons being because there isn't a 
huge offensive line. A lot of people 
ergoyed that" 

TTie lack of the Intramural Field has 
had a big impact on intramural sports as 
a whole. Football was obviously affect- 
ed, with a much different format than it 
normally had because of the move to the 
North Athletic Field. Soccer and Softball 
were also played at the much smaller 



"Initially, the response to the 
switch to 4-on-4 was not favor- 
able. As the year went on, people 
enjoyed it. Ifs a quicker game, 
one of the reasons being because 
there isnl a huge offensive line." 

Mick DeLuca 

Director of Cultural and 

Recreational Affairs 



North Athletic Field. 

Softball was modifi^ greatly. In 
MaioT League Baseball, the Colorado 
Rockies had problems with the ball fly- 
ing out of the park too often, so they use 
a humidor to store balls. UCLA 
Intramural l^x>rts has Used a di£ferent 
approach. The IncredibaU was used to 
restrict flight and it worked beautifully. 



Balls that would normally fly out of the 
outfield stayed in play. 

When the Intramural Field finally 
comes back in August 2003, it will ^ 
better than the old field Th&re wiU be 
more grass space than the old field, and 
brand new turf grass will be used. Also, 
the irrigation system will be in^Hroved 
and the field will be fully lit 

"Well finally be able to use the whole 
field," DeLuca said. 

There is at least one negative to iiUra- 
mural q[x>rts. Some peqple take it way 
too seriously. It do^nt hif^ien often, 
but fi^ts have broken out in the past 

Still, most people do ei:\joy intramural 
sports. 

"The most important thing is for 
everyone to stay active,* DeLuca said 

For more information, stop by the 
Wooden Center or visit 

hUpy/vnvw. recreation, ucla. edu. 



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&28 



THE DMIY BMIN -ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 



8P0RT3 



STUDENTS PAY TO SEE 

FOOTBALL, BASKETBALL, 

BUT OTHER SPORTS WITH 

TITLES ARE FREE 

ByJ.P. Hoomstra 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
jhoornstra@media.ucla.edu 

Jonathan Bryant appreciates the value of 
getting invoK'ed in the school community. It 

fs cost him on at least one occasion. 
Like ail incoming UCLA students last fall, 
Bryant received with his orientation materi- 
als the opportunity to sign up for a Student 
Sports Package, season tickets to all UCLA 
basketball and football home games - for 
$119, the perfect opportunity to get accli- 
mated to Bruin culture. 

1 wanted to be able to get involved in the 
whole UCLA scene, to check out the games 
-i- that's where all the students are going,' he 
said. 

j All of them, perhaps, except Bryant One 
year later, after having attended one football 
game and two or three" basketball con- 
Dests, his hindsight is 2(V20. 
t "Being that Tm not the huge sports fan, I 
wasnt following it; the games kinda snuck 
up on me." 

Bryant is one of approximately 4,700 stu- 
dents that bought an SSP last year, and 
undoubtedly many of them got more for 
their money in terms of games attended 
than he did. Regardless, one detail is adver- 
tised less aggressively to all of them; foot- 
ball and basketball are the only UCLA teams 
students have to pay to watch at home. 

Some of these teams - gymnastics (three 
NCAA titles m the last six years), softball 
(eight in the last 20 years), and men's vol- 
lej^ball (five in the last 10 years) have estab- 
lished a tradition as national-contending 
teams, and are among the winningest pro- 
gnms in the NCAA 

I But this isnt the tradition that matters 
When it comes to putting students in the 



irmances do not necessarily cany 





KDWAHl) LIN i'MLi Bin is >hs • 

Stacey Nuveman hit .529 to lead UCLA softball 
to the 2002 College World Series. 



Tm sure they have tickets for baseball, 
soccer, hockey and other sports, but I'm not 
interested in them," said Darryl Young, 
another student who purchased the same 
SB? last fall before his first year at UCLA. 

"Football and basketball are what UCLA's 
ktK>wn for the most," he added 

j The numbers (football has one national 
tSle in its 83-year history, basketball has one 
since 1976) seem to disagree. 

But the popularity of these "revenue 
^KNTts* is a foregone conclusion in the 
aborts marketing office, where marketing 
director Scott Mitchell oversees a plan for 
4ch of UCLAs 22 NCAA programs. 

' "For softball," he said, "you know you're 
going after younger players and their fami- 
lies." The same is true, he said, for other 
non-revenue sports like gymnastics, soccer 



I \t\t uM m ,9M,mw.9. f 



and swinuning. 

TTie cost of going after fans is what sepa- 
rates the "revenue" firom the "non-revenue" 
sports. According to Mitchell, the marketing 
expenses for men's basketball nears $25,000, 
while football expenditures total approxi- 
mately $330,000 alone. The other 19 pro- 
grams are allotted $100,000 between them. 

Tliat's not cool with everybody. 

"UCLA boasts the number one athletic 
program in the world," women's gymnastics 
head coach Valerie Kondos-Field said. 
"What's that based on? The championships. 
Who hare won those titles? lYie Olympic 
^)orts." 

"What Tve eiyoyed, being here for 22 
years, is that I can go up to Easton Stadium 
and see the best softball being playing in the 
world. I can go into Pauley Pavilion and see 
the best volleyball played in the country. I 
can go to Pauley and see some of the best 
gymnasts in the world. That is what I don't 
feel gets nuj-keted out there ... especially to 



our student body," she added. 

While more aggressive marketing has 
brought in fans from around Los Angeles to 
watch UCLA softball on weekends, weekday 
games are sparsely attended, according to 
head v^oach Sue Enquist 

"The one area where I wish I had more 
(marketing) help is in our student body," 
softball head coach Sue Enquist said. 

"It's a dollars issue, and the bottom line is 
... let's do a good job of promoting the sports 
where there is a product A lot of times, peo- 
ple just haven't been lured into the arena of 
the sport to eryoy it" 

Cyndi Gallagher has been the women's 
swimming head coach for 14 years. From 
her vantage point, the home crowds at 
Sunset Canyon Recreation Center have con- 
sisted mostly of the friends and families of 
athletes. The students in the crowd are 
either friends of the athletes or passers-by 
who hear cheers on their way to the dorms. 

Between moms, dads and vagrant stu- 



EU UYAMAyDAlU Bri IN 

dents, the seats are usually full. Still, 
Gallagher feels that "our marketing people 
need to do a better job." 

Mitchell is quick to point out that every 
poster produced for the non-revenue teams 
advertises the free student admission. But 
it's clear that $100,000, distributed among 19 
sports, can only go so far. 

According to Sports Information director 
Marc Dellins, UCLA football (including 
radio and television money, but not dona- 
tions or corporate sponsorships) is project- 
ed to generate $17.6 million in 2002; men's 
basketball is projected for $7.9 million. The 
non revenue sports, meanwhile, are project- 
ed to gamer $202,000 combined. 

Last year's incoming class was told in the 
orientation package advertisement that, 
along with their purchase of an SSP, they 
would receive free admission to all other 
UCLA regular-season home athletic events. 

They didn't notice. And economically 
speaking, that's fine with UCLA. 





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UCLA atWetic teams welcome 

-I 

walk-on players to their ranks 

NON-RECRUITED STUDENTS STILL HAVE THE 
OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN A BRUIN SPORTS TEAM 



By Jessica Bach 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
jbach@media.ucla.edu ' 

For those four-year high-school athletes 
who are entering I 'CLA this fall on a ptirt^ 
ly academic basts, they nia>- be thinking 
that this spells the end of their athletic 
reign. But this is not necessarily true - 
there are a range of opportunities for stu- 
dents, even at the NCAA Division I level. 

There are two paths open for any stu- 
dent which can lead to athletic prospects: 
IX'LA-sponsored athletic teams (such as 
basketball, football, water polo, etc.) and 
club teams (rugby, lacrosse and field 
hockey). These two options enable a vari- 
ety of athletes at any level a chance to 
play, 

UCLA-sponsored sports are the pro- 
grams that give scholarships and have 
funding available to promote the team to 
the csdiber for which the Bniins are 
known. These programs are the ones 
which allow walk-ons to try out for the 
team, even if they have not been recruited. 

"TTiere are two types of walk-ons we 
use,* men's basketball head coach Steve 
Lavin said. "We have walk-ons that have 
been recruited but not given a scholarship, 
and then there are those who come to us 
and fit the profile we look for - a good stu- 
dent academically as well as a good bas- 
ketball player." 

Those who have not been recruited but 
are admitted students must go through a 
tryout The avenue to these successful tiy- 
outs varies between sports, but the most 
important pnority is to make yourself 
known to the specific coaches. 

"Sometimes the high school coaeh will 
send us tapes of their players," Lavin said. 
"But if not, we encourage them to intro- 
duce themsehes to us." 

This theory differs for the football pro- 
gram, which will hold tryouts sometime in 
March. 

"When students come to us in the fall, 
we are often too busy with the current sea- 
son Co talk to them," assistant coach Mark 
Webber said. "But then after the season 
ends, we are doing our own recruiting. So 
we set a time m March for tryouts that are 
available to any current students. 



"Sometimes guys will contact us as 
walk-ons before school starts, but our ros- 
ter is already full with 105 players," he 
continued. "But we tell them to come back 
after school starts and then we can ask 
them to come back, because after the year 
has started we are allowed to have extra 
players." 

But for many of the incoming or current 
students playing sports jU ti^uit level is not 
IK)ssible, which is where club teams come 
in. 

Club teams constitute non-UCLA spon- 
sored sports but still compete under the 
Bniin name and still travel. Sports like 
lacrosse (men's and women's) as well as 
men's rowing have been very successful 
against other teams, and are open for any 
student to try out. 

Specific dates and times can be found 
in the Wooden Center handbook of activi- 
ties. 

In the history of UCLA sports, there 
have been a number of walk-on players 
that have been successful. 

Danny Farmer, a walk-on in 1995, was 

: able to earn a scholarship and eventually 

b€»came a captain for the Bruins, and is 

currently a wide receiver for the 

Cincinnati Bengals. 

Jason Flowers took the long path to the 
l^CLA basketball team, but finally made it 
to play for the Bruins. After unsuccessful- 
ly trying out for the UCLA team in 1996, 
Flowers transferred to UC Irvine. There, 
he became an integral part of their team 
after sitting out a year under NCAA regu- 
lations regarding transferring. But again 
feeling the call for Division I basketball, 
Flowers transferred back to UCLA and 
finally became a member of the team, 
where, according to Lavin, "he really 
sparked our team after a 4-4 start, and 
took us 6-0 afterwards." 

Walk-ons have become a necessary sta- 
ple for the UCLA athletic department, and 
the opportunities are out there for stu- 
dents who were not recruited. 

"The walk-on players who come to the 
program are valuable and a success," 
Webber said. 

"Because if they give us any playing 
time in either the game or in practice, they 
have a role for us and we needed them." 



•tt 



*ti^ 



Fc4X 



SPORTS 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 29 



Campus center of recreational compass 



HOCKEY. SURFING AND 

SNOWBOARDING AMONG 

MYRIAD OF ACTIVITIES 

OFFERED NEAR UCLA 

By Bruce Iran 

. DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 

btran@media.ucla.edu 

To the west, the ocean serves up some of 
the best waves in the country for surfers. 
To the north, the Santa Monica Mountains 
Recreational Area overlooks the Los 
Angeles area, providing a scenic backdrop 
for hikers. To the east. Mammoth Mountain 
and Big Bear hold snow slopes for skiers 
and snowboarders. To the south, an ice 
rink is home to skaters. 

And in the center? The center is none 
other than UCLA, a haven for sports recre- 
ation - provided you know where to look. 

"No other m^or university in the United 
States gives you such a wide array of 
mountains, beaches and gyms all within 
such a close space of one another," said 
Richard Samade, a second-year electrical 
engineering student. "That's why UCLA is 
such a great place for recreation or just 
relaxation." 

The Pacific Ocean is an arena for surfers 
willing to take on the waves. Bethany 
Dwyer, a store clerk at Islands Surf Shop, 
said "it's about being one with the water. 
You don't have to worry about anything 
else going on." 

For the beginner. Seal Beach is one of 
the better places to learn to surf, "mainly 
because of the smaller waves and the grad- 
ual slopeline. But you 

can pretty much surf 

anywhere there are 
waves, at the cost of 
just $25 a day to rent a 
surfboard. 

For those who want 
to stay on land, the 
Santa Monica 

Mountains are the 
backdrop to UCLA. 
Hikers have their 
choice of 550 miles of 
trails to see 150,000 
acres of steep slopes, 
flat meadows, sand beaches and shallow 
lagoons. The park representatives suggest 
packing lightly, bringing enough water to 
last the day and purchasing hiking boots. 

"I get a really good workout with the 
steep terrain and the long distances," 




Daily Bri in File Photo 

A member of the UCLA snowboaring and ski team races down the hill in a meet last quarter. 



Samade said. "There's only untouched 
wilderness. I don't have to worry about 

traffic or time." 
If you want some- 
thing cooler, you can 
either venture to the 
snow slopes or the 
ice rinks. Mammoth 
Mountain and Big 
Bear have great snow 
for skiers and snow- 
boarders, and it's just 
a three- to four-hour 
drive away. 

"I just happened to 
go on a ski trip," said 
fourth-year Jennifer 
Moore, a psychology student who consid- 
ers herself to be a skiing novice. 

"It's so fun because you fall on your butt, 
but you just get back up. It feels good. 
You're bruised, but it feels good." 

For snowboarders, the classic place to 



"I just happened to go on a ski 
trip. It's SO fun because you fall 
on your butt, but you just get 
back up. It feels good." 

Jennifer Moore 
Fourth-year psychology student 



be is Mammoth Mountain, where many of 
the Olympic snowboarders reside. The 
popularity of the sport is quickly rising, 
and it's about $20 to $30 a day to rent a 
snowboard- 

"There's freedom on the slopes," said 
Yasha Siddiqi, the manager of ZJ Boarding 
House in Santa Monica. "You're out in the 
middle of nowhere on a piece of wood or 
plastic, and it's so quiet You're just making 
turns and you're in a state of serenity." 

If you prefer ice over snow, the Culver 
City Ice Rink offers public sessions and is 
just a half-hour bus ride away. The cost is 
$7 for admission and $3 to rent a pair of 
skates. The rink also offers discounts for 
large parties as well as hockey sessions. 

Each recreational activity has one thing 
in common - the power to allow people to 
lose themselves. It gives people the oppor- 
tunity to escape the world, which - for the 
college student - can be a most valuable 
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BRUIN 




By Hannah Gordon 

DAJLY BRUIN REPORTER 
hgorck)n^)media.ucla.e(lu 

Armed with knowledge of your 
sipehohty to your crimson 
aosstown counterpart, you will 
b« an educated heckler. So study 
up on the history of the UCLA- 
USC rivalry. Here are the ClifTs 
Notes. 

In men's basketball, UCLA 
leads use 117-94 all time, includ- 
ing a winning streak from 1933- 
ld42 and another 19 straight 
spanning the entire 1970s. Those 



were the glory days of coach John 
Wooden (as in the Wooden 
Center, for the Bruin Sports new- 
bies) and BiU Walton (NBC's 
white-toothed commentator who 
shouts "throw it down. Big Man!" 
during NBA games, for all those 
bom after 1980). 

Why does this history matter? 
Because at UCLA, Pauley 
Pavilion is the Sistine Chapel of 
college basketball and John 
Wooden is the Pope. 'Rie lYojans 
may play in the Lakers' former 

RIVALRY I Page 26 



Daiu Britn File Photo 

UCLA'S Billy Knight absorbs the charge from a leaping Sam Clancy during a UCLA-USC game Feb. 26, 2002 at Pauley Pavilion. 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 

Sporting event 
dress codes as 
vital as plays 

To the uninitiated, attending a UCLA 
football or basketball game is all 
about watching the Bruins and their 
opponents battle it out. Nonetheless, there 
is another thing fans in the student section 
are watching: the fashion. 

Where else than in Los Angeles does a 
school's populace emphasize appearance 
so much? Don't worry sports fans, sever- 
al UCLA traditions indicate that all this 
fashion consciousness actually relates to 
the school's storied rivalry with USC. 

A tip for incoming freshmen - do not 
wear anything red to any football or bas- 
ketball game, unless you want to remove 
it to vicious chants of, "T^e off that 
RED shirt" Yes, your fellow Bruin fans 
will spot you wearing a red sweatshirt 
that has nothing to do 
with USC (whose col- 
ors are red and gold) 
and point as they 
chant 

This can quickly 
become quite an 
embarrassing and 
humiliating situation. 
I sadly recall one bas- 
ketball game when a 
male student who 
seemed quite eager to 
remove his red shirt 




Daniel 
Miller 



it'iJa @mwlH irta fldu 



and expose himself 
received additional 
heckling. 

Students also get 
very creative in their USOdissing fash- 
ion. It would be in poor taste to cite 
some of the e3q)letive-laden shirts that 
use words to refer to USC that, had I 
used them as a child, would have obliged 
my mother to wash my mouth out with 
soap. 

To some it might seem silly to remind 
students to wear blue-and-gold clothing 
to UCLA sporting events, yet Bruin fans 
are rather deficient in coordinating their 
blue-and-gold wardrobes come game day. 
The sight of the student section at the 
Rose Bowl - a swaying mass of blue and 
^old <-oiiJ(} })(' quitv broafhtaJdng, if fans 
got their act together r always marf^3t"T 
the fans of football schools like Nebrwai 
and Michigan; when their fans travel to 
the Rose Bowl to play the Bruins, their 
sections in the stadium are a \'irtual sea 
of red and blue clothing, re^)ectrvely. 

During the hot months of September 
and October when the football team 
plays in scorching heat, some students 
get creative in their keeping-cool appareL 
A word of advice to men - keep your 
shirts on - it's never that hot 

As far as the ladies' creatively cut 
shirts and skirts, I am not educated 
enough to pass judgment However, 
while attending some football games 
with some female friends of mine, I often 
hear them remark about others' poor 
taste - again, it would not be prudent to 
quote my friends' exact words. 

Obviously, the outcome of the game on 
the field or the court is all that matters, 
but it is clear that many students amuse 
themselves with their critiques of others' 
choice in apparel, while many simply try 
to blend in. 

Either way, I pray that no UCLA team 
falls so far behind that the only exciting 
thing to keep track of is a sweatshirt 



Pickup games 

good way to feed 

athletic hunger 

I BASKETBALL, OTHER 
ACTIVE PASTIMES CAN BE 
1 FOUND ON THE HILL, AT 
JOHN WOODEN CENTER 

By Ben Peters 

DAILY BRUW CO^f^RIBUTOR 
bpeters@media.ucla.edu 

Sports lUustrateds rating of UCLA a few 
years ago as the best sports school in the nation 
goes beyond the athletic program. Because 
I'CLA's varsity sports perform and recruit at 
>a< h a high level, many accomplished athletes 
attend UCLA for its renowned academics but 
ajF unable to play for and represent the school. 

However, these individuals do not lose their 
hunger for competition easily and many tmies 
the frustrations of school compound the need 
for an oudet for their aggression. This is where 
pickup games come into play. 

Wliile intramural sports are an effective and 
organized method of competition, pickup 
gaiies normally only occur once a week, and 
students often seek a quick, spur-of-the-moment 
activity to distract them from their studies. It 
does not matter what time of day it is, and one 
IS jiever alone in tlie quest. 

iSecond-year student Brad Calkens attests to 
this 

-Often It would be 1 in the morning and I 
w^uld be fed up witli my homework and go into 

PICKUP I Page 27 



Variety of intramural sports 



By Gilbert QuiAonez 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 

gquinonez@media.ucla.edu 

Intramural sports leave great memories 
with those who have taken part in them. 
Just ask UCLA alunmus and former IM 
football and basketball player Brent Boyd. 

"Playing intramural sports was a posi- 
tive experience," Boyd said. "It was fiin to 
go out and compete on a team with your 
friends." 

Many UCLA students come here having 



played sports in high school, or come here 
interested in sports. For those students, 
UCLA was named the No. 1 jock school by 
Sports Illustrated and the school features 
18 intramural sports including men's 
teams, women's teams and co-ed teams at 
different skill levels. 

Various levels of competition are 
offered in intramural sports, usually clas- 
sified as A, B and C leagues. 

"Those who were serious athletes in 
liigh school should probably sign up for 
the A league," said Mick DeLuca, 



Director of Cultural and Recreational 
Affairs at UCLA "All levels are open to 
anyone for recreation." 

The wide variety of intramural sports 
that UCLA offers ranges from 4-on^ flag 
football to squash and water polo. Several 
sports are offered every quarter and are 
played all over campus. Facilities include 
the North Athletic Field, Wooden Center, 
Sunset Canyon Recreation Center and 
even the famous Pauley Pavihon, home to 
38 NCAA national championships. 

TVpically, each team plays a four-game 



season, and any team that finishes with a 
.500 winning percentage or better quali- 
fies for a single-elimination tournament 

The exceptions to this rule are the tour- 
naments that are scheduled by UCLA 
Intramural Sports. Tliese tournaments are 
held in non-team sports or sports that 
aren't in season and are usually one day 
events. 

Four-on-four flag football will likely be 
held in the fall, as it is usually held in then. 

INTRimURAL I Page 27 



UCLA offers novice surfers 
chance to ride the waves 



By Elzabeth Newman 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
enewman@media.ucla.edu 

Southern California and beaches are as syn- 
onymous as Paris and the Eiffel Tbwer, or New 
York and the Statue of Liberty. Along with these 
beaches with vast stretches of sand, cloudless 
blue skies, and perfect waves come - you 
named it - the surfers. 

They should be here, since Southern 
California has arguably some of the best waves 
this country has to offer With UC'LAs campus 
15 minutes fix)m the beach, surfing is definitely 
a ^)ort readily aci-essible to UCLA students. 

If, however, when you hear the words "hang 
ten" and "barrel," you think of a clothing line 
and part of a rifle, UCLA's Recreation 



Department has you covered. TTirough the 
Wooden Center and in cor\junction with UCLAs 
Marine Aquatic Center, 10-hour sessions are 
offered for a small fee to get rookies started 

Wetsuits and boards are included in the 
classes, which are offered weekday mornings 
as well as weekends. "UCLA student 
TTiursdays" even include a fi"ee van service that 
will pick up students fix)m the dorms and trans- 
port them to the beach. 

"Our classes are about 75 percent students," 
says Maggie Lee, assistant manager of the 
Marine Aquatic Center "People have miscon- 
ceptions about surfing being easy, and it's not 
as easy as it looks. But it's definitely a great 
sport to try T8ke a class, see if you get 

SURF I Page 26 




Photo coi'rtesy of Brian Williams 

Brian Williams led the UCLA surf team to the state championships in 2002. 



^ 



RTS 



ORIENTATION ISSUE 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



31 





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THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES 

DAILY BRUIN 



Sennng the UCLA community since 1919 



_— -i— -— I- - ' - - — — 

SUMMER EDITION • Monday, June 24, 2002 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Record number of 

students are attending 

summer sessions 



UCLA 




-testing wireless network 



By Amanda Schapel 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
aschapel@media.ucla.edu 

New minimum progress requirements, 
reductions in enrollment fees, and 
increases in summer fmancial aid have 
wrought 'enormous change" in summer 
school enrollment numbers this year. 
! "Summer study is beconung a part of 
campus culture," David Unruh said. 

Last year, UCLA summer school stu- 
dent enrollment numbers rose 55 percent 
fi'om the previous year, and enrolled stu- 
dents took more units than usual. This 
vumroer, enrollment has risen by about 
another 15 i>ercent, Unruh said. Summer 
session enrollment numbers have also 
risen at other UCs and many California 
State University campuses. 
I UCLA students take summer classes to 
experience the more relaxed environ- 
ment, to fill requirements that would oth- 
erwise keep them from graduating on 
time, and to lighten their class load come 
fall. 

j "I want to graduate earlier, and I want 
tomething to do because three months is 
a long time." said fourth-year electrical 
engineering student Joseph Kwon. 
i David Miller, a fifth-year biological 
chemistry student, is enrolled in an 
English General Education class this 
jummer. 

"I look forward to reading some books, 
which you don't have time for as a South 
Campus major," Miller said. 
I Lex Chen, a third-year molecular, cell 
and developmental biology ms^or said he 
is taking introductory psychology to fill 
ikn "easy" GE requirement while studying 
for the Law School Admission Test. 
j UC students no longer pay summer 
registration fees and pay less for summer 
eonrses ever since the state of California 
Kkegfui ioouii^ part of DC students' bill 
last year. 

The state is making an effort to 
encourage more students to take summer 
school as a way to help deal with system- 
^de enrollment growth. 

Chen said he "didn't even know" that 
his enrollment fees were reduced, but 
Unruh said "the dramatic reduction in 



fees" has had a substantial impact on the 
numbers of UCLA students enrolled this 
summer. 

Summer sessions enrollment numbers 
are also up for local Los Angeles high 
school students and new UCLA admits. 

"Admission to UCLA is highly prized 
and students are anxious to get a start," 
Unruh explained. 

Summer fmancial aid awards have 
increased to help fund the greater num- 
bers of attending students and because 
'the university (is) making summer ses- 
sions a priority," said Pamela Martin, 
associate director of Financial Aid 
Operations. 

The number of fmancial aid awards 
this summer is already as high as last 
year's total - 3,000 awards - so Martin 
estimated the end-of-summer total will 
be about 200 awards higher than last 
year's. 

Summer financial aid is available to 
continuing students from UCLA and 
three other "state-supported" campuses - 
UC Santa Barbara, UC Berkeley and UC 
Davis. 

New admits were not eligible for finan- 
cial aid this year, but "the eventual plan is 
to make financial airl available to incom- 
ing freshmen," Martin said. 

The only student.s appearing in slightly 
smaller numbers than usual this summer 
are international students, because get- 
ting visas has been more difficult after 
Sept. 11, Unruh said. 

"The (Immigration and Naturalization 
Service) is looking much more closely at 
student visas and is much more willing to 
decline them," Unruh said. 

About 500 international students usu- 
ally attend UCLA summer sessions, but 
this year their number will drop to about 
430, Unruh said. 

Though summer enroUment numbers 
have increased, the demand for on-cam-. 
pus housing has remained fairly consis- 
tent with that of last summer, according 
to Angela Marciano, associate director of 
Housing and Hospitality Services. 

Unruh said his department is "all very 
happy" with the increased enrollment, 
and this year's sunmier sessions will be 
"as active and vital as before." 



By Edward Chiao 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
echiao'@ media. ucla.edu 

Students will soon be able to 
trade their Ethernet cables for 
wireless network cards. LICLA 
is going wireless - part of it, at 
least. 

In an effort to bring the 
Internet to UCLA students, staff 
and faculty at any time and any 
place. Communications 

T^hnology Services (CTS) cre- 
ated the Campus Wireless Pilot 
Initiative last November, a pilot 
test for a wireless network 
across campus. The test has 
200 participants and is current- 
ly conducted in a few select 
areas of North Campus. Plans 
are in progress to expand to 
South Campus this summer and 
accommodate an additional 75 
student, staff and faculty partic- 
ipants. 

"We hope the test will give us 
insight into how it enhances the 
university experience and our 
ability to provide wireless net- 
working on a campus-wide 
scale," said Gwendolyn 
McCurry, project manager for 
the Wu-eless Pilot Initiative. 

If the pilot program is suc- 
cessful, a university-wide wire- 
less network serving all of 
UCLA's students, staff and fac- 
ulty could soon follow. 
However, there are no immedi- 
ate plans nor budget alloca- 
tions for a full-scale deploy- 
ment of a wireless campus net- 
work. 

The original time table for 
the pilot program was extended 
through "at least sunmier 2002, 
to continue testing for the capa- 
bility and robustness of the 
technology," McCurry said 

Currently, the Wireless Pilot 
Initiati\ o is being tested on the 
first and third floors of the 
Charles E. Young Research 
Library, the FYanklin D. Murphy 
Sculpture Garden and North 
Campus *»ating and student 
congregatioh areas. The pro- 
gram is now expanding to the 
first floor indoor and outdoor 
facilities in the Ackerman 
Union Tprrace food court. 

Elxpanding the network will 
be relatively simple because 
the wireless network won't 
have to be built firom the 



groimd up. It will instead build 
off of UCLA's Campus 
Backbone Network, the exist- 
ing wired network. Wireless 
Access Points (APs), which are 
wired to the Backbone, will 
send and receive information 
via radio signals to and fi"om 
connected computers equipped 
with wireless network cards. 
These APs perform the same 
function as the typical "router" 
in a wired computer 

The APs for the pilot pro- 
gram will all use the IEEE 
802.11b wireless Local Area 
Network (LAN) specification, 
which operates at the industry 
standard for wireless transmis- 
sion rates. 

In theory, that means wire- 
less technology will allow users 
to send and receive information 
at a bit-rate roughly 100 times 
faster than a standard 56k 
modem, though actual ^eeds 
are often limited by under- 
ground parking structures, con- 
crete buildings and other sur- 
rounding environments. 

Participants in the pilot 
study complained of "varied 
signal strength on steel tables" 
in North Campus conunon 
areas, according to an interim 
survey conducted by the 
Wu^less Pilot Initiative. Other 
complaints included "varying 
signal strength on account of 
weather conditions" and securi- 
ty fears. While McCurry's team 
is looking into the technical 
complaints, she assures that a 
campus-wide wireless network 
can be safe for all users. 

"I think (802.11b) is a stan- 
dard that's used and supported 
quite extensively, and I have all 
the confidence in its (securi- 
ty)," McCurry said. 

Because wireless technology 
tonununicates through radio 
waves traveling in free space, 
the information sent through 
the air is susceptible to hackers 
whose motives are to intercept 
the radio signals to monitor or 
steal users' files. 

Tlie \^lreless Pilot Initiative, 
however, uses the secure 
Virtual Private Network (VPN) 
technology, which has two lev- 
els of security to combat hack- 
ers. The first level requires all 
users to log in with their user 
ID and password. This ensures 



How wireless connection works ' -''^"' -'-'■■'■-■' ■'■ '■ 'l ' 

Wireless "Access Points" send and receive infomiation via radio signals 

Internet Backbone , 



IP switch/router 



Wired pc 



/ 

J 



Ethernet Hub 



Wired pc 



Wireless 
Access Point 

(AP) 



\ 

m\ I 





Source: UCLA Conumiiuty 
Technology Services 



Cover*age area 

CHRIS MONTALVO/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



only students, staff and faculty 
at UCLA can use the wireless 
network. The second level of 
security involves data encryp- 
tion software, which uses algo- 
rithms to scramble outgoing 
information fi-om the sender 
and unscramble the incoming 
signal when it reaches the 
receiver. 

While this is the first time 
UCLA students, staff and facul- 
ty wiU have access to a campus- 
wide wireless network, for 
some at UCLA these networks 
are nothing new. Several 
departments at UCLA have 
been experimenting with local- 
ized wireless networks for their 
own use. 

The problem with these 
smaller wireless networks is 
security and interference. 
Because private networks are 
not regulated by CTS or 
secured by their private net- 
work, they are susceptible to 



hackers and interference firom 
other nearby wireless net- 
works. 

But most students wiD never 
worry about the technical and 
security issues involved with 
wireless networks. Many are 
already waiting to embrace the 
possibilities of a secure univer- 
sity-wide wireless network at 
UCLA. 

"If they can do it, and show 
me that they can do it securely, 
then I would buy a wireless net- 
work card right away," said 
fourth-year, computer science 
and engineering student 
Nicholas Sun. 

"It allows for a lot more flex- 
ibility, and I would use it any- 
where Vm studying - in a quiet 
comer of campus or whenever 
it's nice outside," Sun said 

7b apply and to get more ivSor- 
mation on the pilot program^ go 
to: iuurw.boLucla.edti/ivireless. 



He 




ing out 





Lflft: Political science alumna Qudsia Bekeran, the student speaker for UCLA's College of Letters &. Science com- 
mencement ceremony; plans to go home to her home country of Afghanistan to motivate wonien and chiWren to 
pursue an educatkxi. Mddto: (Geography student Ryan Tashma has his officer's cap and Ensign bars placed on 
him by his dad (left) and sister (right) during the Commissioning ceremony hekj by the UCLA NROTC on June 15th. 
Tashma will travel shortly to SouS Carolina to begin his training to become a submarine officer. 
Wght: Electncal engineer student Richard J. Lim is congratulated by Dean of Engineering Dhlr at the SEAS com- 
mencement ceremony on June 15. Lim will work at SBC Communkiations, Inc. In their management program at 
Texas in the fall. 

Photos by: EDWARD LIN/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



165 UC professors petition for divestment from Israel 

JCLA COUNTER-PETITION CRITIQUES ONE-SIDEDNESS; MISINTERPRETATION CONCERNS PETITIONERS 



By Andrew Edwards 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
aedwards@media.ucla.edu 

More than 100 University of California 
faculty are petitionmg the umversity sys- 
tem to divest from Israel, on the grounds 
Of protecting Palestinian human rights. 
I The petitioners are asking the VC, 
#hich currendy has about $54 nuUion 
invested, to use its political and financial 
weight to take a stand against U.S. mili- 
tary aid to the Israeli government and 
farael's role in the Middle East crisis. 

"The main culprit in this situation, and 
die side that can deliver the goods, is 
Ivael," said history Professor Gabriel 
Eterberg, who signed the petition. 

The petition, signed by 165 UC profes- 



sors, condemns attacks on Israeli citizens 
while comparing Lsraeb actions to the 
South Africa's Apartheid. 

Many, however, find such a compari- 
son ridiculous. 

The analogy with South Africa is 
absurd," said political science Professor 
Steven Spiegel, who finds the petition 
"reprehensible and unwise." 

"It does nothing to solve the present 
conflict," Spiegel said. 

The UC campaign Ls similar to initia- 
tives at other U.S. universities, includmg 
Harvard University, the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology and Princeton 
University. Opponents of the initiatives 
have circulated counter-petitions 
throughout the UC, as well as at Harvard 
and MIT 

The counter-petition at UCLA asserts 



that the divestment Initiative "pours 
scorn on Israel alone." 

"TTie impetus (of the divestment peti- 
tion) appears to be anti-Israel," said 
Rabbi Chaim Seidler-FeUer, of UCLA 
Hillel House, who does not agree with the 
petition, but said he is opposed to Israeli 
occupation of the West Bank. 

History Professor James Gelvin, mean- 
while, signed the divestment petition 
because he said: "(Israel) is a government 
that is now committing an invasion." 

Those in favor of divestment do not 
want their protest of Israeli policy to be 
construed as sympathy or support for ter- 
rorism. 

"In no way should it be interpreted 
that any of us signing this petition sup- 
port the suicide bombers," Gelvin said. 

Not all signatories of the divestment 



petition are siding with either camp. 

"It's a veiy difficult situation for both 
sides ... Israel is not the aggressor," said 
cardiology Professor Mohamed Navab. 

"Both are equally wrong," he said. 

The UC has not yet taJcen any action 
regarding divestment 

A press release issued by John Moores, 
chair of the UC Board of Regents, states 
tliat while the proposals of the faculty are 
welcome, the board is obligated to take 
care regarding funds. 

The board will discuss divestment at a 
future meeting, said Trey Davis, 
spokesman for the UC. 

The petition will be presented this fall 
or next spring. 

This divestment campaign follows 
other "human rights" efforts against UC 
stock in Burma and Tibet 



USAC appointments 

to campus boards, 

committees continue 



By Robert Saionga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.ucla.edu 

The newly-inaugurated Undergraduate Students 
Association Council kept rolling along, appointing 
additional members to important campus advisoiy 
boards and committees. 

On June 11, USAC named student^ to the 
Associated Students of UCLA board of directors, 
Communications Board and several student pro- 
gramming committees. 

Maggy Athanasious, a fourth-year political sci- 
ence and psychology student was named to the 
BOD, which oversees the operations of Ackerman 
Union and all ASUCLA facilities and services. 

Athanasious, former chief of staff for current 
President David Dahle, said she will leave the posi- 
tion now that she is on the BOD. 

Fourth-year sociology and political science stu- 
dent Christopher Hauck, third-year communica- 
tions student Lauren Manalang and third-year polit- 
ical science student Helen Seliverstov were 
s^pointed to the Communications Board, which 
oversees all Student Media operations including the 
Daily Bruin. Seliverstov is a former Daily Briiin 
News contributor. 

General Representative runner-up Allende Palma- 
Saracho will now sit on the Student Fee Advisory 
Conunittee, which makes recommendations to the 
chancellor on student fee levels and uses. 

Additionally, j^pointments were made to the 
Community Activities Committee, Campus 
Programs Committee and the Conununity Service 
Mini Fund, which provides supplemental income to 
outreach and community service programs. 

Dahle made the recommendations to council, 
which were then reviewed by the .^pointments 
Review Committee - consisting of Academic Affairs 
Commissioner Chris Diaz, External Vice President 
Chris Neal, General Representative Adam Harmetz 
and non-voting Finance Committee Chair Hrug 
DerManuelian. 

But the final decision rested on a council vote, 
which could choose not to abide by the ARC's con- 
sultation. 

The council unanimously approved all recom- 
mendations except for Athanasious, who was 
appointed by a vote of 6-2 and with abstentions. 



Weather sr^fL. 



teaday 



t^ Contact 



wnoEM 

310-825 2795 
news^media.ucla.edu 



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310825 2216 
viewpcNnt@media.ucla.edu 



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REMMOElfcTodiViitte 

flrst diy of ■imiiu 

'ichool, sasstat A. 



Index 



Viewpoint. 

A&E 

Sports ... 



4 

.5 
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NewsBheft..2 

Letters 4 

World Cup ... 8 




I 



THE OMLY BaUW ■ MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2002 



NEWS 



DAILY BRUIN 






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BRIEFS 



Court: Fopmep UC student 
insane when he killed 

SANTA BARBARA. ( alif. — A fomur VC 
Saiita Barhiira sdidrnt was insane when he 
drove through a crowded Isia Vista street and 
killed four pedestrians, a jury found 
Thursday. 

David AttijLs, 20. hugged his attorney and 
smiled whei» t|ie verdict was read. The ver- 
dict drew tears from Attias' family and rela- 
tives and friends of victims who crowded the 
courtrtHim. 

Attias was foiind guilty the week before 
last of second-<legiiee murder. A jury then 
began hearing testimony June 13 to deter- 
mine if he was insane at the time. 

Killed were Nicholas Bourdakis, 20; 
Christopher Divis, 20; Ruth Levy, 20; and Elie 
Israel, 27. Levy's 2'<1-year-old brother, Albert 
Levy, was ii\jured. 

Attias had pleaded iniux'ent by reason of 
insanity. 



Spoof issue may get Davis 
paper in trouble 

The spoof issiie of DC Davis' campus 
pai>er. released June 7, sparked complaints 
al)out sexual and racial ref(Tences that could 
lead to an overhaul of the paper's operations. 

Responding to comi)laints about the year- 
end parody issue, the student-dominated 
Campus Media I^)ard agreed Tuesday to con- 
sider firing Ihe editor in chief, Fitz Vo, a 
Vietnamese American who listed himself in 
the Issue as "editor in chink." 

Other controversial items included: 

• An image of a ph:Ulic symbol digitally 
superimposed in the middle of children play- 
ing on the campus' two "egghead" sculptures. 

• A picture of a white student holding a 
knife, eyeing a black student who was Davis' 
student govenunent president last year. 

Vo said he was guilty of Is^ses of judge- 
ment and asked the board to allow him to 
remain editor. 



Parents of boy who 
drowned in pool suing 

The parents of a 7-year-old boy who 
drowned in a backyard pool in Westwood 
sued the homeowners, claiming negligence 
and poor maintenance were responsible for 
their son's death. i 

Paolo Ayala disappeared June 2 after 
attending a schoolmate's birthday party. He 
was missing for about a day before his body 
was located in the deep end of the pool. 

An autopsy showed that the boy had 
drowned. 

The suit filed in Superior Court alleges that 
Saeed and Kimberly Farkhondehpour were 
negUgent in maintaimng the pool and failed 
to properly supervise Paolo, who did not 
know how to swim. 

Franklin and Eduina Ayala are seeking 
punitive and fecial damages. 



Briefs compiled from the Associated Press 




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Ree Seminar! 

Successful Grammar 
Stratej£3s for 



the TOEFL 

for International Students and other Non-Native Speakers 

Tuesday, July 2 

3:00 - 5:00pm 

Westwood Kaplan Center 

1133 Westwood Blvd., Second Floor 

Los Angeles 

Agenda: 

• Grammar points frequently tested on the TOEFL 

• Strategies for success 

• Structure practice and review 

This seminar will be taught by our expert ESL instructor 
who has been teaching TOEFL preparation techniques since 1997. 

Come early if you would like free ice cream. Meet international students 
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Stop by after class and get a frea^pass to the movies 



C06 A«9'^.« ^'"'^ 








SpNPtone 




Cruise on over to the Los Angeles Times table 
on campus and your next movie is on us. 
We're giving away free movie passes to alt 
[students, while supplies last. 

And while you're there, don't forget to ask 
about our student discounts for home delivery. 

So, what are you waiting for? 
Don't miss out on your free pass! 



Cos Angeles ©tmes 



NEWS 



MONDAY. JUNE 24, 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 



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GET INVOLVED IN STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT TODAY! 



Oii.^ 




PAID 

FOR BY 

USAC 



Despite demands from students and concerned faculty 
for the past sixteen years, UCLA is still the only DC campus 
without a diversity requirement! Get involved with the* 
student committee currently working for its implehnentation! 



<;^ 



/ 

I Since the ban on affirmative action [Proposition 209 in 1 996], 

I the diversity of UCLA's student body has dropped dramatical!' 

I Join the efforts in ensuring that UCLA's admissions policies 

I produce a student body reflective of California! 



ii«'^«ia 



Admsshm^ 



A ^ 






The Academic Senate allows students to voice their concems 
to the faculty decision-making body at UCLA. Get involved 
with one of the Academic Senate Subcommittees as a student 
rep. and play a direct role in shaping educational policy! 



^Aj^lWt 



Help make our education here at UCLA as relevant 
as possible by getting involved with the programming 
component of the commission! Put programs that 
address issues of race, gender, labor, & sexuality. 




idvoahional 



▲ ^ 4 i 



L 



¥ 



Learn about the history of student activism, issues 
that affect access to education, and the sl<ills to 

I 

take part in the student movement for educational 
justice. Become empowered! Join the internship! 



4.^ ^ 



^^^Y 



Got a major? Don't like how things are going in 
your department/field? Take an active role in your 
education by being a Student Departmental Senator. 



I 



Sbvdem 



Onvm 



Senate 



Pick up an appAcalion today! 



wfr^ffm^mffw.' 



THE DAILY BmilN -MONDAY. JUNE 24. 2002 



VIEWPOINT 



E-MAIL-=^ MAIL 



Tbe Daly Bruin 
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DAILY BRUIN I Have fun, make most out of summer 

Sen^vgtheUCLAcommunity since 1919 %J 1 %/ 



Editorial Board 

CiAi HTEMoc Ortega. Editor in Chief 

C^OREY M( EleN' \gtng Editor 

Cody Cass, i .. .. ^,.,int Editor 

Kelly Raybi rn. Sews Editor 

EowARO Chiao. Staff Representative 

Amy Frye. Staff Repr • - 

Derek Lazzaw), Staff h ive 

Robert Salonga. St(\ff Representative 
Amanda Schapbl, St(\ff Representative 



Summer can ease 
overcrowding woes 

The words "summer'" and "school" used in the same sen- 
tence have traditionaUy sent chiUs down students' 
spines, but at UCLA it's more of an exhilarating sigh - 
summer school is one of the best solutions to the school's 
overpopulation problem. Car better than other misguided pol- 
icy shifts the univeiaity has recently undertaken. 

UCLA will see an increase of 4,000 new faces on its cam- 
pus in the next ten years as a result of Tidal Wave II, with 
few resources immediately available to accommodate them. 

Recent changes to help cope with the inevitability of Hdal 
Wave n have been mediocre at beat l\w minimum progress 
requirement instituted last year, requiring students take 
upward of 27 ui\its every two quartefs, has been justly criti- 
cized for not allowing students the flexibility needed to deal 
with extenuating circumstances or to pursue extracurricular 
activitea. Unit restructuring, meanwhUe, compromises acad- 
emk recpurements to reduce studoit population, selling out 
students' intellectual growth to meet enrollment require- 
ments. 

These changes have combined to adversely affect stu- 
dents' quality of life much more severely than they will ever 
help alleviate the campus's population cruiKh. 

But thanks to the concentrated effort to make summer 
sdiool more accessible, all is not lost to Tklal Wave Q. In the 
2000-2001 fiscal year, the state aikxrated $13.8 million aimed 
apedficaUy at reducing summer f^s for students; the foUow- 
ing year, it added to this an additional $21 million for three 
University of California campuses - Berkeley, Los Angetoa 
and Santa Barbara. The same year, the state partnered with 
the federal government to extend the available financial aki 
funds for summer sessMns. State subsidization has allowed 
UCLA to drop the cost oi summer school to $76 per unit, 
without registratkm fees. 

Hie 78 perrent increase in summer seaslon enrollment 
over the past two years speaks to the success the measures 
to inc rea s e summer school enrollment have had at the uni- 
versity. The boost in enrollment during the summer helps the 
university brace itself from further overcrowding by extend- 
ing the resources it already has - such as faculty, teaching 
assistants and daasrooms - into time and space it previously 
didn't use to its full potential 

This allows UCLA to keep "growing," even though it can- 
not keep physically growing due to lack of available real 
estate both within the campus and the surrounding areas. 

Hiough summer school may be the university's hao when 
it comes to warding off the choking effects of overcrowding, 
it still carries some of the negative features of ttie afbreroen- 
tkxied policies UCLA has already adopted Once you figure 
in midterms, holidays and finals to r\mtrn - the vast m^ri- 
ty of which are 6 weeks long - the actual amount of instruct- 
ing falls to about five weeks, or half the time of a usual quar- 
ter. 

But given the other means to reduce overcrowding 
already adopted, turning to summer sesnons as a temporary 
answer seems less troublesome - relatively. And other fac- 
tors help to mitigate the negative features of summer 
instruction. 

Counes are a fraction (rf their size between FbU and 
Spring qmrters, housing is readily available, aiKl it spares 
students the need to sit through large, impersonal and often 
ineffective GE classes for 10 weeks, allowing for more con- 
c^itration in the msgor . It^also reduces the required course 
kmd students have to carry during the regular year, freeing 
up tiBbe for extracurricular activities, work and socializing. 

Stodeiris Aoukl take advantage a( the low-cost opportu- 
nities during the summer so they can complete their degree 
within four years, but the univasty needs to spend its sum- 
mers thinking of ways to reduce overcrowding that are less 
costly academically. 



So I am sitting here in Irvine, where 
it is, for some reason, 10 degrees 
hotter than at l^CLA, and I have 
come to the conclusion that the summer 
doldrums have officially started. 
Judging by what I 
did this last week 
between the end of 
spring quarter and 
the start of summer 
quarter, we're all in 
for one big Summer 
o' Fun! Anyway, 
accoiding to me, 
here is what's going 
down for summer 
2002: 

Get oriented: 
there is nothing 
quite like the 
UCLA freshmen 

Orientation is there? I remember 
showing up at Sproul turnaround with 
a backpack, and everyone else had 
huge suitcases that rolled around. It's 
only a few days folks! One of my 
roonunates brought huge gigantic bot- 
tles of shampoo and conditioner and 
styling mousse or whatever and a 
curling iron and blow dryer. I don't 




Bonnie Chau 

txtt^inwIiirtmlLi 



think I ever even met her, Fd come in 
late and she'd be asleep, and when I 
got up in the morning she'd be out 
taking a placement test or something. 

Anyway, orientation counselors are 
cool, the skits they do are funny, the 
supposedly mandatory things they 
hold in Moore where they teach you 
how to put on a condom can be pretty 
entertaining. And when you're not 
stressing out over the mass chaos that 
is signing up for classes, which you 
can still change from URSA once you 
go home, there is always partying and 
hooking up going on somewhere in 
those orientation kids-filled halls. 
Seriously, everyone meets people at 
Orientation with whom they keep in 
touch. At the very least you'll be able 
to recognize a large number of faces 
that you'll wonder about during your 
tifth year here when you can't remem- 
ber how you met anyone. 

Get smart: summer during school! 
School during summer! Yay! Whether 
it's summer school at your local com- 
munity college, UCLA, another UC or 
abroad; whether it's a G.E., pre-req, 
MCAT class, a random art class or a 
really hard class, it'll be so cool. Cool 



in a no-actually-it's-not kind of way. 
Still though, summer school is usually 
a little more laid back or at least dif- 
ferent. But this is me just speaking 
out of my ass because this is the first 
summer Tm taking real, not-just-for- 
fun summer school classes, so we'll 
see how I feel at the end of the sum- 
mer. 

Get paid: more likely than not, your 
summer job and/or internship will not 
be paying as much as you'd like and 
there'll be times when you feel like 
shit because everyone else is out eat- 
ing ice cream and frolicking on the 
seashore. But hey, you can comfort 
yourself with the fact that your strong 
work ethic and sense of responsibility 
and productiveness will pay off for 
you in the long run somehow 

Get fun: I group into this fun cate- 
gory things like parties, museums, 
beach, clubbing, bars, eating, shop- 
ping and movies. This is actually what 
you should be using as filler. Read: fly 
a kite, paint some pottery, do some 
volunteering, go to a county fair, take 
up yoga, have a BBQ, go to a concert, 
learn a new instrument, cook a meal 
for all your friends. Call up old high 



school friends you haven't seen in a 
long time, or just saw the week before 
as the case may be, and contemplate 
over how shocking it is that so-and-so 
has changed so much or not at all. 
Who's engaged and who's already 
married and who finally came out? 
Who turned out to be the surprise slut 
and who turned into a pom star? 
Speaking of fun summer stuff, there is 
always the illegal fim stuff too. But I 
write a good wholesome column so 
there will be none of that here. 

Get trippy: even if you're like me 
and won't ever have more than sever- 
al free days at once, vacations can be 
as short as you want. Family vaca- 
tions can be fun and weird, but take 
one while you're in school and still 
have summers. Take a camping trip 
with coworkers, a road trip with 
friends, whatever. Go to a non-English 
speaking country and come back 
speaking a new language. Or just pre- 
tend you did and start speaking with a 
new accent. It'll impress people. It'll 
probably also scare them, but it's 
suiiuner - who cares? 

Hey it's summer! Just have a good 
time, whatever you're doing. 



Location key to wooing ladies 



NO WOMAN WANTS 
TO BE BOTHERED 
WHEN SHE'S NOT 

LOOKING HER BEST 

Some guys strike out before 
even stepping to the plate. 
These are the batters who 
lack tact and discretion when hit- 
ting on girls. And while some guys 
feel that they are charming enough 
to woo women 
with their 
come-ons, lit- 
tle do they 
know that 
location plays 
a huge role in 
execution. For 
no matter how 
witty your one- 
liners may be, 
setting alone 
determines the 
fate of your 
efforts. 

For some 
reason, males 
possess an 

irmate sensibility to approach 
the opposite sex in the worst of 
arenas. The three of which are 
undoubtedly the worst include 
thp beach, the gym and the 
library, all of which are venues 
men go to looking for love. 

A male's perception of the 
beach involves scantily-clad 
women basking in the sunlight 
amid lush sand and cool breezes. 
However, this optimistic illusion 
could be no further from the 
truth. For women, the beach is a 
place that lends insecurity cou- 
pled with extreme embarrass- 
ment. Wearing that swimsuit we 
swore fit last year while trying 
earnestly to gain some pigment 




Keely 
Hec^s 



on our ghostly white bodies is 
what the beach is all about. We 
come alone to avoid visually 
scaring those people we call 
friends, and all we really want to 
do is be alone, bum, and get 
some much needed slumber. The 
absolutely last thing we want to 
do is engage in any conversation 
with some random guy who yells 
"hey" from across the beach. 

The gym: hot bodies in sports- 
bras and spandex, right? Now 
gentlemen, I'm not sure if you've 
been to the Wooden Center late- 
ly, but I'm pretty sure most of 
the ladies are more interested in 
working out than giving out 
phone numbers. 

There's nothing like being 
approached by a guy while on 
the stairmaster, pitted out and 
reeking of sweat. Sure, the nice 
shade of red my face has turned 
is probably what attracted you, 
but what about the fact that I'm 
wearing no makeup and the 
clothes I have on are rags from 
high school. What's even better 
is when we're wearing head- 
phones or reading a book, and 
the guy has to poke us to get our 
attention. Not only have you 
interrupted my concentration, 
but also have touched my warm, 
sweaty skin. 

If that's not a turn-off, I don't 
know what is. 

The library is a sacred institu- 
tion where one goes to engage in 
the learning process so vital to 
our time here at UCLA. The 
effort one goes to even get there 
and actually study is quite a 
commendable feat by itself. And 
yet, some guys out there use the 
library as their stomping ground 
for picking up and chatting with 
the ladies. First and foremost, 
isn't there a universal library 
rule disallowing conversation? 



Second, do you think we put 
some time into looking all pretty 
for the library? Thirdly, do you 
think we go there interested in 
meeting some guys? The library 
is about the last place I want to 
make small talk with someone 
I've just met, as well as the place 
I care least about what I look 
like. 

Now that we've discussed the 
places where a guy's game does- 
n't stand a chance, ITl briefly 
give you the lowdown on where 
you should apply those oh-so- 
clever come-ons. The first thing 
to remember is that girls would 
rather be approached wheiulook- 
ing somewhat decent, rather 
than when drenched with sweat 
or surrounded by books. This is 
an obvious idea that men suc- 
ceed in overlooking. 

Second, come and talk to us 
when we're not engaged in any 
serious activity. There's obvious- 
ly a reason why we choose to 
wear headphones or hurriedly 
scramble to take notes. 

Last, if you do decide to test 
your skills at one of the three 
aforementioned locales, learn to 
take a hint. If we're not interest- 
ed, we never wiU be, so don't 
stick around long enough to 
make a situation uncomfortable. 

Sticking to bars and parties 
are some of your best bets when 
approaching women. But don't 
rule out pre/post-lecture, as well 
as in discussion, as equally great 
places for putting on the moves. 
There is nothing more flattering 
and exciting than to break the 
monotony of summer by being 
approached by the opposite sex. 

So gentlemen, seize the day 
and come and talk. 

We only ask that you be more 
on the ball in how you play the 
game. 



LETTER 



Articles need to account for 
study abroad distinctions 

We at UCLA's Education Abroad Program were 
disappomted with the errors in Dorothy 
Augustyniak's recent article on students who have 
studied abroad ("UCLA students return home, dis- 
cuss time abroad," News, June 6, 2002). The 
errors were especially surprising given Ms. 
Augustyniak's excellent front-page coverage of the 
EAP on May 20, 2002 ("UC's study abroad enroll- 
ment increases," News). 

The June 6 article makes no distinction between 
EAP, which is the only official University of 
California system-wide study abroad program, and 
other programs through which UCLA students 
study abroad. This makes for some misleading 
comments. 

Of the three students quoted in the article as 
having returned from EIAP programs, only one was 
actually an EAP student (Matthew Heil, Spain). 
The specific complaint cited that EIAP students 
"did not feel incorporated into the university like 
native students" was from a student who did not 
participate in EAP. Although EAP students are not 
always required to study in the language of the 
host university, many students who can work in 
the language of the host country do indeed take 
classes with local students. Matthew Heil is an 
example of an EAP student who was able to study 
in Spain alongside Spanish students. 

We appreciate the Daily Bruin's commitment to 
bring EAP student voices to the UCLA community. 
The UCLA Education Abroad Program sent 500 
students abroad during 2001-02, and while we rec- 
ognize that many students do study abroad 
through other programs, we hope that future arti- 
cles will take into account the difference between 
EAP and other programs. Thank you. 

Emify MohiUeH Norrto 

AdmMttridve Diractor 

UCUEAPOfnce 



Detainee deserves due process 



AL-MUHAJIR NOT 
FORMALLY CHARGED 
WITH A CRIME, BEING 

HELD INDEFINITELY 

By Jordan Beall 

UNIVERSITY TIMES 
UNIVERSITY WIRE 

Imagine for a minute that you 
are in a country where you can 
be held indefinitely in a high- 
security jail cell, you have none 
of the usual rights bestowed to 
the citizens of that country, and 
the government holding you says 
you will not be tried in a crimi- 
nal court where a jury of your 
peers will decide if the evidence 
the siate has against you is 
strong enough to warrant a con- 
viction. 

Now you may be saying to 
yourself that this is a country you 
sure wouldn't want to be in. Well, 
it just so happens that it is hap- 
pening right here in the United 
States. 

Such is the case of Jose 
Padilla, aka Abdullah al-Muh^ir, 
a native of Chicago, who has 
bc-en held in military custody in 
South Carolina for more than a 
month now, accused publicly of 
plotting an attack on the United 
States, possibly including a dirty 
bomb, but he has not been for- 
mally charged with any crime. 

There was probable cause in 
arresting Padilla; for one thing he 
has a long criminal record going 
back to his late teens, including 
murder and grand theft. He has 
no job, yet was able to fly back 



and forth between the United 
States, Egypt, Switzerland, South 
Asia and Pakistan, and we've 
been told by government officials 
that he had information on how 
to make a radioactive bomb on 
his home computer, as well as 
canying $10,000 in cash when he 
returned to the United States. 
Sounds like a strong case to 
build against this suspected ter- 
rorist, but according to the gov- 
ernment, he won't be going to 
court anytime soon, especially 
since he hasn't been charged 
with anything, just detained. 



President Bush said last 
Tuesday that Padilla was a 
bad guy and needs to be 
detained. 



Civil liberties groups are upset 
over the handling of Padilla's 
case, saying that as a U.S. citizen, 
he deserves the full rights guaran- 
teed by our constitution, and I'm 
inclined to agree. In a country like 
the United States it's difficult to 
explain how somebody who is not 
being charged of any crime can be 
detained in a high security prison, 
made to wear shackles at any 
time he leaves his cell, and has no 
opportunity to call his family. 

But tlie Justice Department had 
circumvented this right by charg- 
ing Padilla as an "enemy combat- 
ant," and as such they can detain 
him for as long as the war on ter- 
rorism goes on. 

According to testimony given 
to the Senate Judiciary 



Committee by those formerly 
detained or their attorneys, some 
detainees were held for weeks 
without being charged, without 
being able to see an attorney, and 
without a hearing before a judge. 
Other detainees have been held 
for weeks after being cleared by 
the FBI of any criminal violations. 
They were held incommunicado, 
which violates a cardinal principle 
of liberty. 

Padilla's attomey. Donna 
Newman, was on "Good Morning 
America" last Wednesday and said 
she has not had contact with her 
client since June 7, when he was 
transferred firom the Metropolitan 
Corrections Center, where 
Newman says she had fiill access 
to him. 

On Monday, Deputy Defense 
Secretary Paul Wolfowitz told 
reporters the government would 
consider trying Padilla in federal 
court. A military tribunal could 
try Padilla, but the Bush 
Administration said last 
November that no American citi- 
zen would be subject to trial by 
that method. 

President Bush said last 
Tuesday that Padilla was a bad 
guy and needs to be detained. I 
want to trust the president, and I 
sympathize with his administra- 
tion's desire to stop terrorism at 
home and aboard, but I'd sleep 
better knowing that U.S. citizens 
like Padilla are fomially charged 
with a crime and go to jail 
because a court, after seeing all 
the evidence, convicted him, 
rather than having him detained 
indefinitely just because the 
leader of our country says he's a 
bad guy. 



Diversity fosters 
critical thinking, 
racial awareness 

By Chris Diaz 

Diversity matters. I am a Pilipino American, a 
member of the second largest Asian Pacific American 
community present here in the United States. like 
many younger Pilipino Americans, I was bom and 
raised in this country feeling unconnected to my 
community's rich histoiy. 

Growing up, my education did not focus on the 
Pilipino American e3q)erience. This made me believe 
that things such as race didn't matter anymore, and 
that the activism of the 1960s had alreac^ solved the 
prc^lem of racial op^ressioiL 

As a student at UCLA, it was the diverse set of 
people I interacted with that challenged the perspec- 
tive I had coming into this university. This diverse 
set of people has led me to think critically about both 
sides of both words in the term 'Pil4)ino Americart' 

My interactions with this diverse group of people 
in and out of the classroom have allowed me to see 
the connections my individual actions have with the 
larger movement towards positive social change. 

Nonetheless, one can never have true divarsity if 
there is not a mixture of people coming fix)m differ- 
ent races, ethiudties, genders, sexualities, religions 
and classes. Whether we recognize it or not, our 
identities and perspectives have been influenced by 
all of these aspects. 

For example, our race and ethnicity carry with 
them implicit e3q)eriences. The word 'adobo' causes 
me to react differently than people fix)m other com- 
munities because I grew up as Pilipino. In addition, 
growing up Pilipino has given me a different set of 
values regarding family. 

likewise, an individual growing up as a woman in 
a society full of gender roles carries with it a differ- 
ent set of experiences. Ihis idea also applies to one's 
experiences growing up with a q;)ecific sexuality.reli- 
gion or class. 

This is where true diversity comes from: a diversi- 
ty of peq[>le. From these pec^le comes the diversity 
of experiences and ideas. 

For many others and myself, it has been the inter- 
action with this tyj)e of tme diversity that has made 
education here at UCLA fulfilling. Essentially, when 
we interact with people coming fiwm different expe- 
riences, the quality of our education in and out of the 
classroom in^^roves. 

Studies have shown that a more diverse student 
body in the classroom encourages college students to 
become active in their educatioiL Students in a 
diverse setting are more likely to reflect on the mate- 
rial, and, more importantly, act upon it 

Studies have also shown that a diversified student 
body and curriculum increases the encouragement as 
well as motivation to leam for all students. These 
students become more involved in the educational 
material, show a stronger likelihood of applying for 
graduate schools, and have in^)roved learning of 
intellectual and academic skiUs. 

Lastly, research indicates that the interaction stu- 
dents receive in a diverse setting helps prepare them 
for the interaction with p)eople fix)m different racial 
and ethnic backgrounds they will encounter follow- 
ing graduatioa These students leave college with the 
larger cultural understanding that is needed to live 
and function in out increasingly global society. 

De^ite the benefits diversity has to our education, 
it is something not fiilly embraced at this university. 
Although UCLA prides itself as a campus that has a 
diverse student body and some of the strongest eth- 
nic studies centers available, many students go 
through this university without really understanding 
the importance of diversity. 

First of all, the diversity of incoming UCLA under- 
graduate classes throughout the past six years does 
not match the levels before the ban on affimiative 
action through the passage of Proposition 209. 

In addition, we are currently the only can^jus in 
the University of California that does not have any 
form of a diversity requirement wtthin the General 
Education requirements. It is unfortunate that UCLA 
has yet to bring issues of diversity to the general edu- 
cation we all receive. 

Ultimately, when we don't have a diverse student 
body or curriculum, we lose more than just the visi- 
bility of different communities. We lose an integral 
aspect of our education. 

The most important thing we lose, however, is our 
ability to connect and relate with p)eople coming 
from different conununities on the most basic human 
leveL We lose the ability to converse with those fi'om 
different communities and overcome negative pre- 
conceptions of each other. We lose out on the poten- 
tial life experiences that would challenge us into 
becoming more engaged in our education and our 
worid. 

Diaz is the 2002-2003 USAC academic affairs 
commissioner. 



ARTS<&ENTERTAINMENT 



MONDAY. JUNE 24. 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



EDITOR'S PICK 



I 



'In Utero' 




While everyone niay have 
heard of Nirvana and their 
influence a thousand tunes 
over, it is usually their sopho- 
more album "Nevermind" that 
gamers all the kudos for kick- 
starting the grunge movement 
But Nirvanas best albuni hap- 
pens to be "In Utero." 

"In Utero," the final studio release that he made 
before his suicide, was Cobain's favorite Nirvana 
album. More consistent in song quality than the top- 
heavy "Nevermind," "In Utero" sees Cobain's matur- 
ing songwriting find it's most emotionally honest 
outlet in the spared down production and grating 
vocals and guitars. "In l^tero" is truly Nirvana's opus 
of brilliant rock n' roll atienation. 









Read a book this 
summer; choose 
one you 'U enjoy 

You might think it sounds funny, but Vm going to be 
doing a lot more reading this summer than I did for 
the entire past year of classes. 
Summer has hot days and warm evenings that last 
well into the night Summer has boredom and sweat 
Sununer is the perfect time to read. Whether you want 
to escape or be intellectually or emotionally stimulated 
or, ideally, all of the above, reading is the way to go. I 
mean think about it; we're supposed to milk the whole 
poor-intellectual-arty-college student thing which 
makes movies too expensive to do every day, and 
besides, what else are you going to do? Sit around and 
watch the mailman walk by pushing 
his cart while the grass grows? 

So, at this point hopefully you 
want to be hangmg out at the pool, 
paperbacks in hand and sunscreen 
appUed. What kind of books tit you 
want to read this summer? 

Because mayl)e you're a better 
student than I am, and you've done 
a lot of reading, gone to class and 
become so sick of books you can't 
simply skim through that you want 
to pick up some lighter fare. There 
are plenty of fun books out there 
right now, so maybe you 11 tiy a 
"Harry Potter," (I just read the third 
one myself) but then you remember 
that you already saw the movie. You browse through 
some other best-sellers and start to become disillu- 
sioned because you know the Hollywood endings to 
what seems like most of them. 

So, with your head slightly hanging down and some 
of your initial-invigorated-small-elf-tickling-your-toes 
excitement beginning to shatter, you head over to what 
Barnes & Noble or Borders (depending on your book- 
store orientation) tend to refer to as the literature sec- 

BROMBEM I Page 6 




PACKED WITH MALE ROCK. PUNK AND 

METAL BANDS, THE KROQ "WEENIE ROAST' 

GAVE FANS A TESTOSTERONE-DRIVEN 

EARFUL ALONG WITH A FEW SURPRISES 




Photos by CATHERINE JAYIN JUN/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Doug Robb of the band Hoobastank rocks out on 
the punk stage at KROO's annual "Weenie Roast." 



Anthony 
Bromberg 

ilii»i<iij^iiil«i«'i»arti 



MkMIe V. Gonzales 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 

nfigonzales@media.ucla.edu 

Amid the perfect freeways and flatlands of Irvine 
that provided the backdrop for KROQ's "Weenie 
Roast," one of the two biggest surprises of the day 
came when the sound went out during Bad Religion's 
set 

Other than that and a secret special guest, the 10th 
annual "Weenie Roast" boasted few surprises June 
15 at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in Irvine. The 
radio station's annual summer event included about 
15 bands playing throughout the afternoon and into 
the night 

Thanks to the thousands of fans that attended the 
sold-out show, several charities were set to benefit 
greatly, including the Surfrider Foundation, AIDS 
Walk Orange County and Heal the Bay. 

As fans entered the venue, they headed off to the 
hot black top to the artists performing on the Bud 
Light side stage. Unlike years past the main stage 
was closed oCf, so fans were left to wander around 
the vendors and watch musicians on the side stage. 

The stage featured singer/songwriter Jack 
Johnson who loosened up the crowd with his mellow 
guitar riffs and soothing surfer voice. Other bands 
like The Vmes, Hoobastank and Unwritten Law also 
entertained the crowd with high-energy rock before 
the members committed themselves to their paid 
seats in the amphitheater 

Fans had the opportunity to explore the vendor 
tents, featuring tents by major companies Snapple 
and Wienerschnitzel and local clothing companies as 
well as tents with the high-priced venue food. Here, 
KROQ DJs entertained fans with interviews and free 
t-shirts. 

The bands of the main stage opened up with old 
and new punk acts r^resented by New Found Glory, 
Jimmy Eat World and Bad Religion. 

Bad Religion fans filled the amphitheater with 
booing after the sound went out The band still 
played a song without even realizing what had hap- 
pened, and were able to play a couple of songs at the 




Brandon Boyd of Incubus croons to the crowd at 106.7 KROQ's 10th annual "Weenie Roast" at the Verizon 
Wireless Amphitheater on June 15. 



end of their set once the sound was restored. 

Other bands included mainstream electronic artist 
Moby, rockers Puddle of Mudd, New York imports 
The Strokes, and locals Incubus and P.O.D. As the 
night wound down, Rob Zombie ended his set and 
surprise guests, TTie Violent Fenunes, took the stage 
to play a classic and instantly recognizable set of 
songs. Ttie members of The Violent Femmes were 
calm and collected, moving only slightly around the 
stage, but the fans did er\joy the surprise of hearing 
the veteran band play live. 

The last band to play was Los Angeles "nu-metal" 



rock band System of a Down, who ended the night 
with an energetic, eardrum-breaking set Guitarist 
Daron Malakian bad-mouthed the Verizon 
Company's takeover of the venue known in the past 
as Irvine Meadows. The crowd agreed with his com- 
ments with cheers and screams, fueling the already 
burning fire in the audience that the band had 
aroused 

De^ite the rowdy reputation of years past, lawn 
antics were kept to a low thanks to the multitude of 

WEENIE I Page 6 







UCLA alumna gains acclaim for work in reality genre 



Disney Enterprises, Inc. 



"Lilo and Stitch" and "Minority Report" helped lead the film industry to 
another big weekend. 

I- 

'Minority Report' just cruises 
ahead of 'Lilo and Stitch' 



By David Germain 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

Tbm Cruise and Steven 
Spielberg wound up in a dead heat 
with a cartoon kid and her goofy 
alien paL 

•Tdinonty Report," Cruise and 
Spielberg's sd-fi thriller, took in 
$3d9 million in its first weekend, 
according to estimates Sunday by 
its distributor, 20th Century Fox. 
Tliat would put it barely ahead of 
the aiumated "Lilo & Stitch," which 
debuted with $35.8 million, accord- 
ingjto its studio, Disney. 

Disney and other studios had 
tracked "Lilo & Stitcii" in first place, 
slightly ahead of "Minority Reix)rL" 
TTie weekend's other new wide- 
release, "Juwanna Mann," debuted 
at No. 7 with $6 milliorL 

Studios base weekend [wojec- 
tions on actual ticket sales reported 
by ttieaters for Friday and Saturday 
and estimates for Sunday. When 
filial numbers come in Monday, 
"Lilo & Stitch" might edge out 
"Minority Report" for No. 1. 

Bruce Snyder, head of distribu- 
tion for Fox, said his estimates put 
"Lilo & Stitch" at $36.8 million, just 
$100,000 behmd "Minority Report," 
making it too close to call 

Tm not claiming No. 1. Tm not 
claiming anything," Snyder said. 
Td call It a tie." 

The U>p movies rarely bunch up 
so ickisely. In 1999, Sunday esti- 
iiiaOes had Paranioimt's "Double 



Jeopardy" in first place, Universal's 
"The Story of Us" in second, and 
Fox's "Rght Chib" in thir± Final fig- 
ures Mond2^y lifted "Fight Qub" to 
No. 1. 

Studio executives privately 
grouse that competitors sometimes 
inflate Surniay estimates to make a 
film's results look better, even if 
only for a day, before reporting 
lower numbers Morulay. Ekit stu- 
' dios avoid public fingerpointing. 

"As mucii as Fd like to go there, 
Tm not g(Mng to. Tliat's not our 
style," said Chuck Viane, Disney 
head of distributioa "Of course it 
bothers me. In my heart I know Tm 
right, and I assume that in the 
morning the dust will settle that" 
Disney's "Lilo & Stitch" finished 
ahead of "Minority Report" 

Viane said he thinks Fox simply 
erred and does not believe the stu- 
dio deliberately inflated its 
"MiiK)rity Report" numbers. 

Snyder said Fox's figures w«ie 
legitimate estimates but conceded 
the rankings might change. 

"Coukl I be wrong? You bet," 
^lydersaid 

Even if its rank changes, 
"Minority Report" may retam brag- 
ging rights as the No. 1 film, since 
many news outlets pay greater 
attention to SuiKlay estimates than 
they do to final Monday numbers. 

"The first reporting of the box 
office, in my miiKi, tends to be the 

BOXOFFICE I Page 6 



MARY GLYNN WORKS 
FOR MTV'S SHOW 
TUPPED/ DEALING 
WITH TEEN ISSUES 

By Mayra Marquez 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
mmarquez@medja.ucla.edu 

Most reality shows are likely to 
draw groans and revulsion, but for 
producer, director and UCLA gradu- 
ate Mary E. Glyim, her work on 
episodes of MTVs TV show 
"Flipped" has gained positive 
reviews and feedback for the strik- 
ingly real scenarios plaguing young 
people today. 

"It's been challenging, great and 
ultimately rewarding," said Glyrm, 
who has worked on a total of three 
"Flipped" episodes ranging in sub- 
jects firom class clowns to racism to 
her most recent, teen violence. 

"Flipped" is a show in which real 
pec^le's lives are essentially flipped 
for them to see the alternate side of 
their actions. Past episodes have 
taken school bullies and flipped 
them into nerds, the ridicule of an 
entire school, in hc^)es that they real- 
ize the consequences of their previ- 



ous lives. According to Glyim, many 
times after the episodes air, the teens 
portrayed will take a 180 degree turn 
for the better 

"They're just really hard subjects 
because they are very real and when 
involving young people, it gets more 
difficult," said 
Glyim. 

The episode 
on teen violence 
is scheduled to 
air in late July or 
early August The 
issue of teen vio- 
lence is one that 
Glyim spent 

much time 

researching for 
the episode only 
to find some 
alarming reah- 
ties. 

-What I'd like 
to see people get out of it is that it's 
real and it's happening, and to try to 
help people out in the situation," said 
Glynn. "And also to be aware of the 
signs, because what we found out in 
our research is that there are precur- 
sors to potentially violent relation- 
ships. I just want people to be more 
aware of what's hs^pening around 
them." 

The reality genre is one that Glynn 



has explored before and calls one of 
her favorites. She produced a docu- 
mentary, "Hidden Victims," on 
domestic violence for Lifetime 
Television and an MSNBC docimien- 



tary "Betrayal," 
acquaintance rape. 



"What I'd like to see people 
get out of it is that it's real 
and it's happening, and to try 
to help people out in the sit- 
uation. ... I just want people 
to be more aware of what's 
happening around them." 

Mary Glynn 



which tackled 

"When people 
think of reahty 
TV, what they 
start thinking 
about is 

'Survivor* or 
'Temptation 
Island,' but 
before all that 
what reality TV 
meant was real 
people, real lives 
not done in 
tabloid style. It 
was more hard- 
core documen- 
tary-style pro- 
gramming ... and that's the kind of 
style I really like," Glynn said. 

Glynn's other favorite genre is 
film, in which she is also active and 
has just produced her first feature, 
"The Kingston High." The film, 
directed by Stephen Townsend, also 
a UCLA alumnus whom Glynn 
became acquainted with while at 
UCLA, follows the story of a high 
school goody two-shoes and his last 



UCLA alumna 



attempt at the girl of his dreams. 

"He brought the story to me years 
before we produced it when I was 
still working in development," said 
Glyim. "I tried to get it sold for him in 
a couple places, but they wanted us 
to attach famous people and we 
were like, 'Wait a minute, no one 
knows who we are.'" 

"The Kingston High" received 
favorable reviews fix)m its premiere 
at the Hollywood Black Film Festival 
and at the Pan African Film Festival, 
where the film was shown twice due 
to the overwhelming positive buzz 
fi"om the premiere. 

Glynn's career in the entertain- 
ment industry has spanned over 10 
years and began here at UCLA in her 
days as an undergraduate student 

"I came from a really small town 
and didn't know too much about the 
world. I think the way UCLA influ- 
enced me is that they really showed 
me that there are a lot of opportuni- 
ties out there for people of all races 
no matter what color. UCLA is like 
this huge melting pot of people," 
Glynn said. 

The opportunity that started 
Glynn's career rolling was working 
for Academy Award-nominated 
director John Singleton ("Boyz in the 

GLYNN I Page 6 



Commercialism, talent makes Wango Tango oddly successful 



DESPITE SHAMELESS SELF- 
PROMOTION, ARTISTS PUT ON 
EXCITING SUMMER SHOW 

By Sophia Whang 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
swhang@media.ucla.edu 

While summer concerts have become the hot 
ritual of the season, they've also turned into an 
annoyingly perfect method of promotion for 
artists. { 

This was the case of the sold-out fifth annual 
Wango Tango, a ten-hour concert put together by 
102.7 KIIS FM last weekend, a concert that 
seemed more like an extended commercial. 

The radio station broke its tradition of holding 
the concert at Dodger Stadium and moved to the 
Rose Bowl to accommodate its growing crowd 
and reputation. Artists would be out of their 



nunds to give up performing in front of 70,000 
fans from the most sought-after demographic. 
Even legends like No Doubt and Will Smith, did 
not rest on their laurels, as each hyped up their 
new album or film release. 

The brief £4)pearances of Scooby Doo and 
Jennifer Love Hewitt to promote their upcoming 
films were both bothersome and poinUess; the 
latter staying on stage just long enough to 
announce her new endeavors. And the Mexican 
singer Paulina Rubio took off more clothes than 
necessary while repeating the name of her 
recently released album, "Border Girl." 

Luckily, the entire show didn't seem like a 
ploy. 

A long, warm summer day with a lingering sun 
after eight is part of what created the magic of 
the concert. The mood was heightened with 
some of the truly extraordinary music created 
that night. Pink and Steven TVler belted out a 
duet that left audience members stunned. Will 
Smith lost his MIB suit to a more relaxed outfit 
that matched his "Sunmiertime" single. The sta- 



dium sang along with Celine Dion's titanic hits 
and embraced Gwen Stefani's enthusiasm and 
Marc Anthony's sizzling band. After dark, glow 
sticks created a relaxed effect that could only be 
accomplished in a venue and crowd of that size. 

Surprise celebrities like Ozzy Osboume also 
added additional excitement to an already 
impressive list of artists including Alanis 
Morissette, Ja Rule, Ashanti, Vanessa Carlton, O- 
Town and India. Arie. ^ 

The most disappointing performances were 
given by Kelly Osboume, who was way off-key, 
and by Nick and Aaron Carter, who were basi- 
cally busy jumping around on stage. The down 
time of twenty to thirty minutes in between each 
act was also inconvenient; even the toughest rev- 
elers can't party that long. j ' 

Although there was always some tyjie of pro- 
motion, the concert at the Rose Bowl was ironi- 
cally like the quality commercials during the 
Super Bowl. The impressive acts and the sum- 
mer mood will most hkely convince the fans to 
go see that latest movie or buy the new CD. 



m DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY. JUNE 24, 2002 



-]- 



ART8<&ENTERTAINMENT 



Ann Landers columnist dies at 83 



By Maura KeHy 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

CHICAGO — Ann Landers resonated 
with readers for nearly five decades 
because she evolved with the times. 
Wrote about topics that others shied 
»way from, and never let her advice get 
«ale, her daughter said Sunday. 

U While Esther Lederer won a contest to 
rome the second Ann Landers after the 
olumn's creator died, it will not be car- 
ed on by another writer after Lederers 
( leath on Saturday. 

"She owned the copyright and she did 
not wish for the name to continue." 
Margo Howard said of her mother. *She 
fell it was very much associated with 
her" 

Instead, a new column called Ann's 
Mailbox willW written by Kathy Mitchell 
i md Marcy Sugar, longtime editors otAim 



f 



Landers. 

Lederer died at the age of 8.*J from mul- 
tiple myeloma, less than two weeks 
l)efore her July 4 birthilay. A farewell col- 
imin written by Howard will be distrib- 
uted Monday. Lederer's syndicator. 
( 'reators S.vndirate of Los Angeles, said in 
a statement Simday. 

Ann Landers colimms that Lederer had 
alrea<ly completed will nm through July 
27. "TTiat v,iti Ix' the last colimin with Ann 
I-anders' byline." said Richard S. 
Newcombe. president of Creators 
Syndicate. 

Creators will provide two new advice 
colunuis. one written by Howard, who 
has been writing the cc^hmm Dear 
Prudence for the online magazine Slate, 
the company said. 

Howard, of Cambridge. Mass., said her 
mother s columns r€*sonated with readers 
because she tackled tough topics and 
kept up with trends. 



"She was very brive about what she 
chose to get Ix^hind and she went public 
aI)out some issues that otlier people 
wouldn't have," Howard said. "She was 
ai)le to change with the times. There was 
nothing dated about her opiruons. She 
just made it her business to stay current," 

Lederer, who was known as Eppie, 
wrote about homosexuality, abortion and 
AIDS in the colunui she started writing in 
19.55 in the Chicag<i Sun-Times. She 
switched syndication companies in 1987, 
and the colimin moved to the Chicago 
TVibune. 

"Her warmth, wisdom and conmion 
sense iiiformed and controlled genera- 
tions of Americans," said Peter Rowe, 
presideiit of the National Society of 
Newqjaper Colunmists. 

Lederer's twin sister, Pauline Elsther 
"PoPo" Phillips, also known as Al)igail Van 
Buren, fpUowed her into the profession as 
writer of! the Dear Abby column. 



BROMBERG I Books help stimulate conversation 



from page i 

Ition. Momentarily, you get the smallest 
Shiver of icy dread down your soon-to- 
be well-tanned spine as the word "Uter- 
ature" registers in your consciousness 
is a red-alarm word setting off your 
Class-teacher-school sensors. Teike a 
breath, and it passes. Relish the fact 
that no matter how serious a book you 
pick up, no one is going to make you 
raise your voice in a crowded room and 
analyze the use of eye imagery as a 
metaphor for existentialist philosophies 
on the dying and birthmg process. No 
One is going to give you a quiz to see 
how your progress is going. And no one 
is going to make you write a paper 

So, pick up whatever book catches 
your fancy. If you're in the mood for 
some anti-authoritarian dreamy prose, 
give the recently deceased Ken Kesey a 



whirl. If you want to do some heavy 
thinking on your own, without any out- 
side pressures, pick up a philosophical 
treatise if you can stomach it. Don't be 
afraid of the classics. You've got all 
sunmier so read a rumbling behemoth 
hke "War and Peace," or "Cnme and 
Puiushment," or "Ulysses." You could 
even read poetry that makes you want 
to shout violent and touching words 
into the skies crisp sunmier nights. You 
may thank yourself later for accepting 
the fact that you dcr.'t have to be an 
English student, and might even get by 
as an engineer, to find greater truths or 
friends in characters of a book with 
small print and a lot of pages. And 
don't be afraid to pick up a trashy 
novel that is based on plot if that's 
what gets your rocks off. 

Not only will reading give you some- 
thing to do, you'll also find that it gives 



L 



you something to talk about. Say you 
run int<|) an old friend back home and 
there's Jul awkward lull in the conversa- 
tion. Without missing a step, you'll be 
able to fill the void with witty banter 
about Leopold Bloom and Roddy 
Raskoliiukov. 

Thenj there's the added bonus that 
the opposite gender finds reading 
incredibly sexy. No really, don't laugh 
because they do. Or at least I try to tell 
myself girls want me because I pretend 
to be wlell-read, and not just for my 
body. 

OK, so you don't have to be a read- 
ing fanatic like me and you don't have 
to be somewhat obsessive about the 
possibilities that lie within the moon- 
shine gems we call words, but remem- 
ber not to be afraid of them either 
There's a lot to read about beyond the 
classToi>m. 



GLYNN I Alumna balances jumps between genres 

from page f find a balance and that's the biggest Glynn, It is not easy to move around 



^, 



ood") through an internship class. She 
was a communication studies student, 
but found her home in films, having 
worked on Singleton's "Poetic Justice" 
and "Higher Learning," which was filmed 
at UCLA. 

UCLA is a school that allows you to 




find a balance and that's the biggest 
thing that I learned at UCLA I know that 
I don't just have to do one thing. I can do 
a lot of different things in different areas. 
UCLA is a perfect example of that kind 
of school," Glyrm said. 

Balance is what Glynn has kept in 
mind in her pursuits of various arenas of 
the entertainment industry. According to 



Glynn, it is not easy to move around 
from dilfferent genres, but that doesn't 
stop het pursuits. 

"Well I think it's crazy," said Glynn. "I 
wish I Wanted to be a doctor or a lawyer 
My mom probably wishes that too, but 
you know it brings me joy and I'm pas- 
sionate about it. Even though I'm starv- 
ing, I might as well keep going for it" 



WEENIE I Testosterone-fueled concert 
lacks female rock but still thrills fans 




CATHERINE JAVIN JINVD.mlv Brhn Senior Staff 

New Found Glory's bassist bounces around the stage early on at 
the KROQ n/Veenle Roast" in Irvine. 



:0m page 5 



yellow-skirted secunty guards. 
One of the few things that 
caused an uproar were a few 
smuggled fireworks and fans div- 
ing down the lawn into crowds, 
imitating a human-lawn-bowling 
meets ice-blocking event. The 
lawn was definitely the place for 
fans who didn't want to be con- 
strained by seats and appreciat- 
ed the chance to bond with other 
music fans. / 

The music satisfied the KROQ 
listeners' spectrum of genres and 
interests. Fans eryoyed music 
from the genres of singer/song- 
writers, pop punk, old school 
pimk, hard rock, electronica and 
heavy metal. But the lack of 
female artists in the repertoire 
was very questionable. All of the 
bands were testosterone-fueled 
rock, with no representation of 
the female voice in rock music. 

Similar to previous "Weenie 
Roasts," the price of the ticket 
seemed reasonable for the 
amount of bands that played, but 
any intimacy was lost in the big 
amphitheater The price of food 
and drink was high, with lemon- 
ade for $4 and beer for $10, in 
addition to the pricey food menu. 

Yet despite all, the day's 
events left fans happy, satisfied, 
sunburned and with enough 
testosterone driven angst to last 
at least until next year's show. 



BOXOFFIGE I 'Lilo' wins ticket count 



from page 5 

one that sticks in people's 
minds," said Paul 

Dergarabedian, president of 
Exhibitor Relations, which 
tracks ticket sales. "You can have 
people proclaiming a movie as 
No. 1 for the rest of the week, 
evai if it winds up being No. 2 
come McHiday." 

"lilo & Stitch" dearly would 
be No. 1 based on actual tickets 
sold It managed to do virtually 
the same amount of cash busi- 
ness as "Minority Report," 
though a much hi^er percent- 



age of "lilo & Stitch" admissions 
came fit)m cheaper tickets for 
children and adult matinees. 

Many in Hollywood say that 
instead of counting dollars, the 
industry should track movies 
based on number of tickets 
sold, a method used in some 
European countries. That 
would provide a fairer head-to- 
head ranking of films and elimi- 
nate the inflation factor that 
skews all-time box-office charts 
toward newer movies, which 
place higher than older films 
because of ever-rising ticket 
prices. 



Spielberg, in an interview 
three weeks ago with The 
Associated Press, said he would 
prefer a system based on 
admissions numbers. 

"I really wish we could forget 
about these obsessions with 
box office, and rather than 
printing how much money the 
movie earns in current dollars, it 
would be much more valid a 
measurement to do what they 
do in France, which is to count 
heads," Spielberg said "And to 
basically determine how well 
your fihn is doing based on 
admissions." 



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MONDAY, JUNE 24. 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



AGASE I Four former Bruins make Cup worth watching 



from page I 

gel jokes. 

Maytx* I'm talking like I swalloweii some 
of that footballitis ointment, with all this 
lovey-dovey gushing over a s{H>rt to which 
most of us were relative strangers a month 
ago 

But if you're at all mxlduig yoiu- head along 
with my sappy babble, (or just wincing in 
memory of the United States' 1-0 loss to 
Germany), you catch my drift 

This was the year m the LIS. when soccer 
games became Soccer Games. It was a Finals 
W^ek when you stared blankly at a closed 
EkXMi book on your coffee table the night 
before a titanic exam, sighed, and flipjxxl on 
Uilivison to catch Paragua> and Slovema 

So much has been going for the World 
Cup, which, just like the gritty American 
team, struck at an opportune time Jaded by 
the Lakers, Red Wings and 'Rger Woods 
bUtzkiieging their way to titles, fans turned to 
soccer for world-class competition and pas- 
sion. Soccer answered. 

The World Cup has l)een, qiute amply, the 
thing to do. But with four teams left and the 
siarprising Americans out, will anyone be 
awake at 3 a.m.? Check that Anyone who is 
sober^ 

Hard to say. Naturally, enthusiasm ^ew in 
the States as each successive match replaced 
its predecessor as THE BIGGEST GAME IN 
VS. HISTTORY. 



(.)nly the next few years will tell. M^or 
League Soccer expects a .surge of interest for 
some time, thougli it knows all too well that 
.\mencaiis can quench tlieir year-round sport- 
ing thirsts elsewhere. 

But it's also clear tJiat tlus U.S. team is 
imhke prior s<iua(Ls - confident and (dare I 
say) respect e<l, the Americans surely won't 
enter the next Cup at 300 to 1 odds. 

It is naive, not to mention unfairly demand- 
ing, to expect soccer to dominate the U.S. 
sports landscape as it does elsewhere. It has, 
however, found a substantial niche and won 
over some of the most ardent soccer-is-a- 
communist -sport skeptics. 

And now to add some levity to an other- 
wise imcharacteristically uber-romanticized 
colunui; .some dandy and not-so-dandy (soc- 
cer words 1 picked up) developments from 
the 2002 World Cup. 

• Tonuny Smyth. The straight-shooting 
Irishman pulls no punches in his analysis, 
thougli (me meets great difficulty in translat- 
uig his words once he gets going. I remember 
hini saying something like, "Well, EIngland 
have two ijowernful goal scorerrrs, David 
Beckham, who runstowrd the goalwit gret 
deteeeniination" (followed by two more miiv- 
utes of passionately garbled ^)eech). DANDY, 
if not entirely comprehensible. 

• Scoreless ties. Mine eyes have seen the 
boredom! In only a pair of pool games did the 
two teams fail to scote a goal. But seeing 
FYance and Urtiguay battle to nil-nil made me 



feel like 1 was 14 again, staying up all night to 
get a glimpse of skin on Showtime.. .to no 
avail. NOT S() DANDY 

• Penalty kicks to end elimination match- 
es. No comment NOT EVEN CLOSE TO 
DANDY 

• Blatant Nationalism. Tlie World Cup has 
always been a fonun for former colonies to 
strike back (see Senegal), the continuation of 
petty disputes (see England and Argentina) 
and jokes about premature FYench surrender 
(see FYance). DANDY, to a point. 

• Hopping. (Insert your favorite Vlade 
Divac joke here). NOT SO DANDY .1 

• Former Bruins in the Cup. Brad Friedel 
was masterful in goal, Cobi Jones is now the 
dean of U.S. Soccer, and FYankie Hejduk and 
Eddie Lewis outplayed the German midfield. 
DANDY 

• Korean "cheering teams." Fans were paid 
by the Worid Cup organizers to don the shirts 
of foreign teams and urge ihem on. NOT SO 
DANDY - How can this fanatici^n go on with 
the Expos suffering a continent away? 

• Landon Donovan. When he zipped along 
with the ball, I kept switching back and forth 
between singing The Space Between" and 
yelling, "throw it down, quick man!" in a Bill 
Walton Voice. DANDY - the future of U.S. 
soccer. 

We've all had too much fim these last three 
weeks to see soccer lay dormant until 2006. 
Here's hoping footballitis becomes a chrtMiic 
disease. 



CUP 

from page 8 

ed in the semifinals. 

Nobody is happier to be there 
than T\irkey and South Korea 

For TXirkey it means a chance 
to get even for the loss to Brazil 
in the first round, which the 
T\irks blamed on poor officiat- 
ing. 

"Right now, a final with 
Tiirkey vs. South Korea? Why 
not?" TXirkey coach Senol Gunes 
said. "Teams with less World 
Cup experience and success 
have shown a great impact 

"Brazil is one of the biggest 
teams in this tournament but we 
didn't deserve to lose the first 
game." 

South Korea coach Guus 
Hiddink knows he's the under- 
dog against Germany. 

"The schedule is not in our 
favor," Hiddink said, upset the 
team must play again on 
Tuesday with only two days' 
rest 

"We approach the next game 
against Germany like, once 
more, a bunch of young dogs. 
We have nothing to lose. We are 
going to play as we like to play." 




TUF, Ass< K I.M Kl » PiiK.ss 

St. Louis Cardinals' Darryl Kile, pitching in this 2000 
file photo, was found dead in Chicago on Saturday. 

KILE 

from page 8 

police said. 

"It looked like he was asleep," said Dr. Jim 
Loomis, the Cardinals assistant team physician. 

Though there was some talk of postponing 
Simday night's game out of respect for Kile, the 
Cardinals voted unanimously at a team meeting 
Saturday night to play the game in his honor. A 
fierce competitor, Kile spent almost 12 years in 
the mayors without ever going on the disabled 
list 



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DAILY BRUIN 



■f-- 




M 



ONDAY, June 24, 2002 



earn postseason 



WHISLER NAMED AN 

ALL-AMERICAN; CLARK. 

ARHART SIGN FREE 

AGENT CONTRACTS 

ByJefTAgase 

DAILY BRUIN STAFF 
jagase^media.ucla.edu 

UCLA freshman sensation Wes Whisler 
added to his growing collection another 
accolade last week, while catcher Josh 
Arhart and pitcher Wade Clark inked free 
agent contracts. 

Tlie do-everything Whisler, a 
pitcher/first baseman/designated hitter 
from Noblesville. Ind., was named a Tliird 
"Dpam All-American by Baseball America. 
It came just days after the publication 
dubbed Whisler a First Team Freshman 
All-American. 

"I expected more than good things from 
Wes," UCLA head coach Gary Adams said. 
"I expected great things. But what sur 
prised me was that he caught on so quick- 
ly in his freshman year." 



Whisler is just the second l^CLA fresh- 
man to land on the All-American team, 
joining Garret Atkins, who was a selection 
in 1998. He also rode a torrid finish to the 
year to brake Chase Utley's UCLA fresh- 
man single-season hon»e run record. 

After a shaky feehng-out process, 
Whisler exploded onto the collegiate 
scene, finishing with a .320 average, 18 
home runs, and a 6-2 pitching record with 
a 4.06 ERA. His versatility and offensive 
prowess aided the Bruins when starting 
pitcher Casey Janssen and batting average 
leader Ben FVancisco both went down 
with mid-season ii\juhes. 

It came as little surprise to Adams, then, 
that Whisler's renaissance coincided with 
his team's late-season improvement 

"He hates to lose, hates to fail and loves 
to succeed," Adams said. "We were playing 
with such mediocrity that 1 think he just 
said, 'I'm tired of this, so I'm going to do 
my part to change things and turn things 
around.'" 

Arhart, a senior catcher from Tustin, 
Calif., signed a contract with the 
Princeton Devil Rays of the rookie-level 
Appalachian League. After not being draft- 
ed, he joined the te&iii for its late season, 



which began June 18. 

Arhart was second on the Bruins in bat- 
ting average among regular starters, and 
his 37 RBI put him behind only Whisler 
and fellow senior Adam Berry. He 
improved his throw to second base and 
caught 17 of 53 men attempting to steal 
base. 

"I think his senior year he got rid of the 
ball quicker," Adams said. "He improved 
himself in three areas - getting rid of the 
ball quicker, accuracy and strength, and if 
you improve a little bit in each area you 
might improve one to two tenths of a sec- 
ond and it can make all the difference." 

Mock draft predictions had Arhart going 
as high as the 15th round, but his name 
was not called on draft day. Neither was 
Clark's, despite the 6-foot-7, 235 pound 
righty's imposing mound presence and big- 
league build. 

Clark struggled to find his range in his 
three years at UCLA, ending with a 6.88 
BRA in 69. 1 innings but plenty of potential. 

"He's not wild, but he has to locate his 
pitches a little bit better," Adams said. 

Clark will play for the Detroit Tigers 
organization in the short-season Rookie 
Oulf Coast League. 



BRUIN 

Baseball vs. UCSB 
Baseball @ Washington 
Softball @ Oregon 
Track vs. USC 
Baseball @ Washington 
Softball @ Oregon St. 
Baseball @ Washington 
Softball @ Oregon St._ 



PREVIEW 

Today 2:00 pm 

Friday 6:30 p.nfK 

Friday 



2:00p.m. 

all day 

J:00 p.m. 



Saturday . 

Saturday . _ 

Saturday • 2:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. 

www.dailybriun.ucla.edu 




Daily Bru!n File Photo 

Freshman Wes Whisler was named a Third Team All-American by Baseball America. Whisler broke 
Chase Utley's UCLA freshman single-season home run record. 




South Korea vs. Germany 
Tuesday, June 25, 4:30 a.m. 



e 




European teams fail to dominate semifinals 



By Stephen Wade 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

YOKOHAMA, Japan — European teams 
have only twice failed to be in the top two in 
the Worid Cup's 72-year history - in 1930 and 
1950. 

It could happen again on June 30 in 
Yokohama, Japan - a signal that soccer's cen- 
ter oi gravity might be shilling away from the 
old contiiient and toward Asia, Africa - and 
even North America 

With the quarterfinals completed on 
Saturday, the Worid Cup semifinals look like 
this: South Korea vs. Germany on T\iesday in 
the South Korean capital, Seoul; and Brazil vs. 
l\irkey on Wednesday in Saitama, Japan. 

A Brazil vs. Germany final is not out of the 
question. But neither arc the other three possi- 
bibties: Brazil vs. South Korea, IXirkey vs. 
Germany, or even TXirkey vs. South Korea. 

For the first time since 1978, there are only 
two Eur(^)ean teams in the final four - three^ 
time champion Germany and l\irkey, hardly 
one of the usual European powers. IXirkey is 
appearing in only its second Worid 
O4), its first since 1954. 

The other two semifinal i.sts 



again represent the old and new. 

Four-time champion Brazil is the touma- 
ment favorite, a role it assumed when defend- 
ing champion France was knocked out in the 
first round without scoring a goal South Korea 
- the first Adan team ever to reach the semifi- 
nals - is the sentimental favorite. By reaching 
the semifinals, South Korea went one better 
than its northern neighbor, which made it to 
the quarterfinals in 1966. 

In Saturday's two quarterfinals, South Kprea 
defeated Spain 5-3 on penalties after a 0^ 
draw, and 1\irkey beat Senegal 1-0 in overtime. 

TXiesday's Geniiany vs. South Korea semifi- 
nal is a repeat of a group game in 1994 in the 
United States, which Germany won 3-2. The 
two starting goalkeepers - Oiiver Kahn and 
Lee Woon-jae - were on the bench in the 
match. Lee came in as a substitute when 
Germany ran off to a 3-0 lead after only 20 min- 
utes. 

German coach Rudi Voeller was still playing 
for Germany in that 
match and came 



America's cultural 
net catches soccer 
excitement: Dandy 



Our eyes red, our bodies famished 
for sleep, and our fanaticism dealt 
a staggering blow early Friday 
morning, will we rise early Wednesday to 
watch Brazil play TXirkey? 

Is soccer finally here to stay? Has 
America moved on 
already*? Should 
America move on 
already? 

Eight years ago, 
after artists of the 
worid's ^x>rt set up 
studio in our back- 
yard, the answer 
was typically 
American: "Wow, 
that was fim. Are 
the Dodgers on?" 





on as a second-half substitute. 

Brazil and IXirkey have only played twice - 
in an exhibition in 1951, which Brazil won 1-0, 
and again in the first round of this Worid C\q), 
when the Brazilians won 2-1 on a goal from a 
controversial penalty kick with three minutes 
left. Elarlier this year, Hirkey turned up against 
two South American teams in exhibitions, 
beating Chile 2-0 and losing 1-0 to Worid Cup 
qualifier Ekniador. 

Strangely enough, Brazil and Germany have 
never met in the Worid Cup. 

The shift in power away from Europe has 
been gradual but seems to be gaining ^)eed. 

In the previous five Worid Cups going back 
to 1982, Europe took 16 of the 20 semifinal 
places. In 1982, it claimed aU four semifinal 
spots. 

The semifinal lineup this time is the most 
diverse since the first Worid Cup was played in 
1930 in Uruguay when one North American 
team (United Stittes), two South Americans 
(Argentina and Uruguay) and one European 
(Yugoslavia) reached the final four. 

Seventy-two years after the first tourna- 
ment, three continents again will be represent- 

I CUP I Page 7 



Brazil vs. Turkey 
Wednesday, June 26, 4:30 a.m. 



In 1994, soccer 



JefTAgase 

arfi8mBdHirtH<r>i 



was Spider-Man 
without the suction. It 
slammed mto the edifice 
that was our national psy- 
che, only to slide back 
down to the floor months 
later 

But something has hap- 
pened this summer The 
Sun has gone down and soccer, to 
those willing to sacrifice grades for 
goals, pillows for penalty kicks, has 
been the beacon. 

In any given lecture, I could turn left 
or right and find someone truly excited 
to talk about the World Cup. It was a 
campus buzz normally reserved for 
UCLA basketball season, minus the hair 

AQA8E I Page 7 




Cardinal pitcher Kile dies in 
Chicago hotel room at age 33 

AUTOPSY CONCLUDES 

CORONARY ARTERY 

BLOCKAGE LIKELY 

CAUSE OF DEATH 



By Nancy Armour 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

CfflCACiO — Some of the St Louis 
Cardinals gathered in small groups, 
remembering Danyl Kile and trying to 
understand how he could be dead at 
just 33. 

Others went off by themselves at the 
team hotel, preferring to work through 
their grief and anger on their own. 

"Tliey're all doing it in their own indi- 
vidual way," Brian Bartow, spokesman 
for the Cardinals, said Sunday. "Itll be a 
long grieving period E^>ecially coming 
so shortly on the heels of Jack Buck's 
passing. 

"TTiis was tough to take." 

An autopsy performed Sunday by the 
Cook County medical examiner con- 
cluded that Kile likely died from a 
blockage of a coronary arteiy. 

As the Cardinals mourned their 
fiiend and teammate, they also began 
the process of moving on a day after the 



pitcher's death. 

The team held a 30^ninute memorial 
service for Kile c«i Sunday morning at 
the team hotel Several members of the 
St Louis Chapter of Baseball (Chapel - 
including former Cardinals pitcher Rick 
Horton - came to Chicago to lead the 
service. 

Kile's wife, FTynn, spoke to the play- 
ers at the end of the service, and many 
stayed afterward to share their memo- 
ries of the veteran pitcher. 

A few hours later, they were back to 
work, playing the Chicago Cubs in a 
game Kile was scheduled to start 

"It's a part of life. I understand that," 
pitcher Woody \^^lliams told the St 
Louis Post-Dispatch. "Danyl was a spe- 
cial fiiend and a great father. You look 
at him. He's in great health. He's 33. 
How do you explain something like 
that? You really can't But I have faith in 
God and believe he has a purpose for 
everything." 

Kile was found dead in his hotel 
room Saturday afternoon after team- 
mates became concerned he hadn't 
shown up at Wrigley Field Hotel secu- 
rity forced their way into his locked 
room and found him in bed Theie was 
no sign of a disturbance or foul play, 

KILE I Page 7 



FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK 



Decisions, 
decisions 

To play football or to play base- 
ball? That is the question for 
Jarrad Page, who signed a letter of 
intent to play safety at UCLA and 
was drafted by the Milwaukee 
Brewers in the fifth round of the 
Msyor League Baseball Draft in 
June. The 6-foot, 200-pounder is 
still considering his options. 

"I'd like to do both," he told the 
San Francisco Chronicle. 

NCAA regulations would allow 
for it. Ricky Maiuiing, Jr. and Matt 
Ware currently play UCLA football 
in the fall and nunor league base- 
ball in the summer. 

On the other hand, Page could 
conceivably go the route of Mike 
Nixon, a top safety from Phoenix, 
who withdrew from his letter of 
intent to play football at UCLA to 
concentrate on baseball. Nixon, 
who signed a contract worth a lit- 
tle over $1 million with the Los 
Angeles Dodgers a week after they 
took him in the third round of the 
draft, was ejqpected to compete 
for playing time as a true fresh- 
man in the UCLA secondary. 

Not SO fast 

Former UCLA standout running 
back DeShaun Foster was side- 
lined once again, but this time it 
had nothing to do with an NCAA 



violation or an iixjury. 

An agreement between the 
NCAA and the NFL that prohibits 
rookies from practicing with their 
new teams while their schools are 
in session forced the Carolina 
Panthers' second-round pick to 
miss two weeks of voluntary 
workouts. 

Because UCLA is on the less- 
used quarter system, and its 
school year concludes later than 
those on the semester system, 
Foster was the only inactive 
Carolina rookie. 

"I'm not going to say it's unfair," 
he told The Herald (Rock HUl, 
S.C). "If it's a rule, it's a rule. If we 
were on semesters, we wouldn't 
have known anything about this. 
But we're on the quarter system. I 
mean, this year we played four 
games before school even started. 
So we just start school later than 
everybody, so we get out later. 

"It was fun while I was in col- 
lege. Now it hurts a little bit, but 
it's OK." 

In the meantime, Foster worked 
out with former UCLA safety 
Marques Anderson, a third-roimd 
pick of the Green Bay Packers 
who also had to miss practice 
because of the rule. 

Foster returned to practice last 
Monday after the school year 
ended the previous Friday. He will 
have to make up for lost time 
quickly, as he is contending with 
veteran Lamar Smith for the start- 
ing running back job. 



108 ANGELES KINGS DRAFT PICKS __^_______ 

The Los Angeles Kings' selections In the NHL draft, held Saturday and Sunday In Toronto: 

Round, (overall pick In parentheses) 

1. (18) Denis Grebeshkov, D, Yaroslavl (Russia Sr). 

2. (50) Sergei Anshakov, LW. HC CSKA (Russia). 

3. (66) Petr Kanko. RW. Kitchener (OHL). 

4. (104) Aaron Rome. D, Swift Current (WHL). 4, (115) Mark Rooneem. LW. Kamloops (WHL). 

5. (152) Greg Hogeboom, RW, Miami. Ohio (CCHA). 5. (157) Joel Andresen. D. St.Albert 
(AJHL). 

7. (215) Mikhail Lyubushin, D. Kryjja (Russia). 

8. (248) Tuukka Pullianen. C/W. Tuto (Finland). 

9. (279) Conor James. RW. Denver (WCHA). 

SOirRCE: The Associated Press 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES 



Sending the UCLA communitv invce 1919 




BRUIN 



SUMMER WEEKLY EDITION - Monday, July 1, 2002 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



WorldCom stock 
drop hurts UG 



By Noah Grand 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 
ngrand@medla.ucla.edu 

Allegations of dishonest business 
practices in corporate America have 
once again hurt the ITC to the tune of 
hundreds of millions of dollars. 

The UC estimates it lost $362.5 million 
in WorldCom stock after the conq^>any 
revealed faulty accounting practices ear- 
lier this week. 

Though the losses are even bigger than 
the UC's Enron stock losses, they are less 
than 1 percent of the value in the UC 
Retirement Plan portfolio. 

"The WorldCom losses do not affect 
the university's ability to provide benefi- 
ciaries with retirement benefits," a state- 
ment fi^m the UC said. 

On Tuesday, June 25, WoridCom 
revealed that internal auditors found that 
the company had hidden $3.8 billion in 
jexpenses as long-term investments. 

UThat means WoridCom - the nation's 
?ond-largest long-distance company - 
may have lost millions of dollars while 
reporting it made a profit 
I WorldCom CEO John Sidgmore 
responded in a pubUc letter, saying 
WorldCom management is "surprised 
and outraged" over what happened. 

"I am proud that our own people dis- 
covered these irregularities and had the 
courage and professionalism to act 
quickly," Sidgmore said in the letter 

Sidgmore also pledged to work with 



WORLDCOM CRASHES, UC LOSES 

State agencies lost over $1.2 billion as 
WorldCom stock prices fell amid accusations 
of faulty accounting practices. For many 
entities WorldCom stock losses were worse 
than earlier Enron losses. 



aoor 



900 - 



400 



WorldCom losses 
fj* Enron tosses 

600- 



v^.: 





Fireworks light up the 
sky during a Fourth 
of July celebration 
last year. 



Dadly Britn FUk Pwnx) 



^moom 




WORLDCOM I Page 2 



• ^Jumbe^s in miUkxis of dollars, according 
to agency claims. 

StRfRCE* IK- offlcr nf the Pn>sidnit, CALPERS. 
CMSntS,AmodMeilPnm 



LACK OF SPIRIT IN WESTWOOD HAS 
RESIDENTS GOING ELSEWHERE 




GRACIELA SANDOVAL/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 




NEWS ANALYSIS 



l^ignature verification delays 
Racial Privacy Initiative vote 



By Robert Salonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.ucla.edu 

The next step in Regent Ward 
< i^onnerly's fight to end racial classifica- 
tion in the state will now have to wait 
until 2004, and proponents are banking 
on California's voters not showing up 
|o the polls. 

i Verifying the required 670,816 peti- 
tion signatures for the Racial Fhivacy 
Initiative took longer than the state's 
June 27 deadline - an outcome the 
Connerly-backed American Civil 
Rights Coalition claims to have strate- 
gized earlier in their campaign. 

The initiative would bar the state 



from collecting and maintaining almost 
any type of race-based data, with 
exceptions including medical research 
and prisons. 

ACRC Executive Director Kevin 
Nguyen has said all along that they pre- 
ferred the 2004 ballot to avoid this 
November's gubernatorial election and 
to have more time to further pubhcize 
the initiative and raise additional 
funds. 

In April the ACRC said it would sub- 
mit just enough signatures to trigger a 
full count verification by tlie California 
Secretary of State office. The idea 
worked as planned, and the delay in 

UUTUnVE I Page 2 



By Edward CNao 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
echiao@media.ucla.edu 

The Fourth of July is only 
three days away, but it seems 
Westwood hasn*t taken notice. 

This year, the holiday falls on a 
weeknight when students liave to 
study. It's also illegal to set ofif 
fireworks without a permit in 
California And in Westwood, 
there are still more Lakers flags 
being di^layed in storefronts 
and on passing cars than there 
are American flags. 

In fact, the closest event 
resembling an Independence Day 
celebration was last week's pre- 
miere of "Men in Black II, " star- 
ring Will Smith. 

For the restaurants in 
Westwood, July 4 means business 
as usual - if that 

"We've got nothing plaimed 
(for July 4)," said Rla Jones, 



manager of BJ's Pizza and Grill in 
Westwood. "I expect it to be 
extremely slow, because people 
would rzUher go to the beach and 
barbecue." 

BJ's isai't the only restaurant in 
Westwood which slows down 
during the night of fireworks. 
Jerry's Famous Deli, Acapulco 
and Maloney's On Can^us all 
reported consistently less busi- 
ness on July 4, according to their 
restaurant managers. 

Of the three, only Acapulco 
plans to do something about the 
traditionally slow holiday. 

"I wish we would be busy, and 
that the students would come in, 
but no," said Rod Soriano, man- 
ager for Acapulco. "So we're hav- 
ing happy hour prices and half- 
price appetizers to try to bring 
them in." 

Westwood Brewing Company 
decided to take a completely dif- 
ferent approach to the holiday. 



AMGIE LEVINE/Dail* Bruin 

Fireworks, like the ones above, are illegal in Los Angeles without a permit 
But there are other forms of entertainment available for students. 



"We're closed on July 4 to 
show honor and respect to the 
fallen veterans who fought for 
our country's independence," 
said Joey Ramirez, restaurant 
manager. 

Westwood Village has no 
planned events for Thursday 
evening, outside of normal busi- 
ness operations. 

Even the Los Angeles Fire 
Department's 37th precinct, 
which serves Westwood, isn't on 
special alert, according to 
Captain Armando Jaimes. The 
fire department is on alert "for 
events like midnight yell and 
other events, but the Fourth of 
July is not one of them," Jaimes 
said. 

The fire department, however, 
is wary of illegal fireworks, which 
can start fires if they are improp- 
erly set off. 

"Every fire station will remind 



people that fireworks are illegal," 
Jaimes said ITie fire station has a 
banner outside its building 
reminding residents that fire- 
works are illegal. 

"While we don't noimally con- 
fiscate fireworks - the (Los 
Angeles) police department does 
that - we can assist them," 
Jaimes said 

A university police sergeant 
declined to comment on whether 
students in the past had illegally 
set off fireworks or caused dis- 
turbances. UCPD also dedined to 
conunent on any additional 
staffing or special alert their 
patrols might be put on for July 4. 

Students, however, were open 
about their plans on Tliursday 
night 

"rm going to study," said 
fourth-year psychology student 
Marry Soakhavong. "I don't really 

HOUDAY I Page 3 



WHAT TO DO ON THE FOURTH_ ^ ___^ 

UCLA and Westwood don't have much to offer on Independence Dayi but other tocatlons nearby do. 



Where 

Fourth of July Celebration at Culver City 
Kigh School at 4401 Elenda St. 

Marina Del Rey: Firework Show at ' 
Fisherman's Village I 

Hollywood Bowl: Target July 4 Fireworks 
Spectacular at 2301 N.Highland Ave. j 

First Independence Day Celebration in 
Los Angeles on Olvera Street 

Burbank Starlight Bowl at 1249 Lockheed 
View Drive, Burbank 

Studio City Fireworks Spectacular at 
4024 Radford Ave.. Studio City , 

San Jose Earthquakes at Los Angeles 
Galaxy at the Rose Bowl. Pasadena , 

Baltimore Orioles at Anaheim Angeles, 
2000 Gene Autry Way. Anaheim , 

Disneyland at 1313 S.Harbor Blvd., 
Anaheim 

Source: Information complied by Edward Chiao 



What 

Hour-long firework show 

Fireworks show on the harbor 




Music and fireworks 

Celebration with musket salute, reenactments 
anddyies \ "* 

Features the Tonigfit Show Band and fireworks 
show I 

Country bands andlive entertainment 

' / 

Soccer game and fireworks afterwtrd 



Baseball game and fireworks afterward 



Fireworks display and street show 



When 

4-10 p.m. 

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SARAH WAGNER/Daily Bri^in Senior Staff 



T?PV1^P(1 ^tiltP HOW A BUDGET IS PASSED \ 

-^^^^''^^^ OLdLV/ Preparing a txidget Is a k)ng and arduous process, especially when funds are tight. The fiscal year starts i 

July 1. but budget deadlines are weekly enforced and often budgets are passed later. i 

i200?-TJ3 

NoMBmber As CaSl^mtas econon^ tculspins after 
Sept n. GoML Gray davis asks aS state ag^ictes 
19 prepare tor 15 percem budget cots for the ne&(t 
Iteaf yetr. Aiso, mK^ aimies.1he UC Inctuded 
are derir nid-year iito tbr the Mm-'02 year. 



budget likely 



to restore UC 
outreach funds 



By Chrtsdna JenMnB 

DAIY BRUM SENHDR STAFF 
q)enkins(i)media.ucla.edu 

As the deadline for signing the state's 
budget dawns, the UC is crossing its fingers 
in hc^)es that it will secure a niore favorable 
financial future than it expects. 

ITiough the proposal remains held up in a 
legislative conference conuiuttee and open 
to revision, consultants say that the newest 
version restores money designated for UC 
outieach that was cut in the Gov. Gray 
Davis' May proposal. 

July 1 marks the deadline for Davis to 
approve the budget, which he caimot 
review until an Assembly-Senate approved 
bUl emerges from the Legislature. Budgets 
are often late, especially in tight fiscal years. 

In the biggest amendment to the preliiiu- 
nary \5^ budget detailed in May, 75 percent 
of the proposed cuts to outreach fimding 
have been restored in the current plan. 

Approximately $25 million of Davis' pro- 
posed $33 million in cuts to programs that 
eficois^ge students of diverse backgrounds 



ft dfilvslR stale 

flMxlsst iRGTMses 



to 



BUDGET I Page 3 





budgsteiriliferbtilons 
cveralt but includes 
fheUC. 



9|irftig; droupG iie fe UC studert association 
IP to Gscrafflento tt) figtit forniRds. UCSA piaces 
ii^eping s&dant feet at currem ievQfs at top of 
agend9. Bepom Ihyn Leglsiative Analysis ofHce 
soy stale's eoonomi^ outlook worse than Davis 
had thought in January 
i 

Ml^ U: 'Ves^ Rewsions" cafl for over $160 milliod 
in cuts to tf» X, wifh outreach and j-esearch hit 
hardesl Revisions do not ca« for rase »n student fees. 

.kiw: AsewnWy and Senate wor it to pass a budget 
to gve to the gDvenpr. with Reptibllcans staufKtiiy 
apposing Oavis' May cafi ^ tax incrf.ases 

JUM 2B; OoBi^vubll^ vote is all senate demoa ats 
nMcfit^^WfitniiBlr budget to ttie Assembly, wtiere 
RepuMcans (Mge ibt to support tax hikes. 

1 

July 1: 2002 "Oa fiscal year begins. 

July ^-18: Regents w8i rneet in San Francisco. 
Wi they have a budijor to wort with? 




The Asscxtated Press 



Dr. Henry Kawamoto (center). Dr. Jorge Lazzareff (right) and Dr. Michael Karpf (far right) at 
a presur^ery news conference on separating conjoined twins on June 24. 

Conjoined twins undergc 
first phase of operation 



StXlH E: U< Office of thrprciwlnM 



GRACIELA SANDOVAF^Dmi.y Hri in Sknioh Staff 



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310 825 2095 



ByKeltyRaybum 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
kraytxjm(a)mediaucla.edu 

E3even-month old Guatemalan twins who 
are joined at the head underwent a skin 
expansion procedure last week at the UCLA 
medical center. It was just the first part of a 
rare separation c^ratioa 

Maha de Jesus and Maria Tferesa Quiej- 
Alvarra responded well to the anesthe^sia and 
the surgery, doctors saiti, but a small tear in 
their skin, incurred during the operation, may 
delay their next surgery. 

Last week's skin exj^)ansion procedure was 
"almost a dress rehearsal for the twins' longer 
surgeries next montli," said Dr. Henry 
Kawamoto Jr., a UCLA plastic and reconstruc- 



tive surgeon, on June 24, after he conducted 
the 75-minute surgery. 

Tlie most difficult part of the $1.5 millicm 
procedure, which UCLA is doing for fiiee, will 
be separating two msyor veins that ccMinect 
the fixHit of each girl's head to the back of the 
other's. 

LXiring last week's preliminary (^)eration, 
doctors prepared the girls for their separation 
by threading two eight-inch long silicone bal- 
loons under each girl's skin, near the groove 
where their heads are joined, a statement 
fit)m the Medical Center said 

Tlie end of the balloons runs in a hose with 
a seLf-sealing valve, into which doctors will 
ii\ject saline solution twice a day. As the bal- 
loons inflate the twins' tissue will expand, 
TWINS I Page 4 



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li 



THE DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY. JULY 1, 2002 



WORLDCOM 



from page 1 

Bush and the appn)phate federal 
agencies to investigate possible 
fraud, "and to set an example by 
accepting responsibility and taking 
decisive action." 

Afler repeated phone calls, 
WoridCom could not be reached for 
ftirther comment 

"Hie UC's losses are only esti- 



mates, said VC spokesman Trey 
Davis, because the university has 
not sold all of its WorldC'om stock: it 
still owns 14.6 million shares. 

*rm not sure whether we're in the 
process of selling those shares," 
Davis said. 

The university has sold some of 
its stock, but L^vis would not say 
when the stock was sold or how 
much was sold. 

He did say that the UC lost $10 9 
million on the stock it already sold, 
but that is only 3 percent of the total 



estimated loss. 



NEWS 



Enron again? 

This is not the first time that the 
UC s pension plan has been a victim 
in corporate accounting scandals. 

After Enron started heading 
toward bankniptcy in November, 
the UC sold all its stock in the com- 
pany, worth about $145 million. 

In that case, the UC joined a class 
action lawsuit against top Enron 
Corp. members and their auditor 
Arthur Anderson a month later, 



accusing them of fraud. 

However, the UC has not decided 
whether to sue WorldCom. Any deci- 
sion about whether to sue 
WorldCom would be made by the 
UC Board of Regents, Davis said. 

The university's general counsel - 
the legal arm of the UC - will gather 
information for the board to help it 
make its decision. 

Davis said there is no timetable 
for when the board would decide 
whether or not to sue. 

There isn't a particular fact 



somebody is waiting for in order to 
make a decision," Davis said. "We 
have to gather information to see 
how the matter is developing." 

The board is currently directing 
the suit against Enron because the 
UC was named lead plaintiff. 

Other public pension plans 
throughout the nation are in posi- 
tions similar to the UC's. 

The California Public Employees' 
Retirement System estimates $600 
million in losses on WorldCom 
stocks and bonds. 



They have yet to decide whether 
or not to sue, according to Pat 
Macht, an agency spokesperson, but 
a decision could be made in a few 
weeks. The agency joined the suit 
against Enron when it had only lost 
$40 million. 

CALPERS has not sold any of its 
stock in WorldCom. Macht said the 
agency is currently evaluating when 
to sell the stock. 

With reports from the Associated 
Press. 




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INTIATIVE I Regent Connerly 
predicts approval of RPI 



from page 1 

counting will likely place the RPI 
on the March 2004 ballot alongside 
the presidential primary election. 

"There's nothing lost by postpon- 
ing it," Connerly said. "We know we 
have enough to qualify. That's the 
important thing." 

The typically low voter turnout 
that accompanies a presidential 
primary would also be advanta- 
geous to the campaign, Nguyeh 
said. 

"The small universe of voters 
that will turn out helps us focus our 
message in a more efficient way," 
he said. 

But he dismissed the idea that 
low turnout would not constitute a 
mandate by California voters. 



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"You can't rob a ballot proposi- 
tion of legitimacy because of voter 
turnout," Nguyen said. "That's not 
reasonable under our system of 
democracy." 

Even if the RPI ended up on the 
November ballot, Connerly predict- 
ed that it would be approved by 60 
percent of the vote. 

The 1996 ballot initiative 
Proposition 209 that banned the 
use of race and gender preferences 
in hiring and admissions by state 
agencies - which Connerly also 
spearheaded - passed with 64 per- 
cent of the vote. 

But the issue is not neariy as 
two-sided as it was six years ago. 
Connerly successfully polarized the 
state as being either for or against 
affirmative action, making the vote 
clear-cut It's trickier now with the 
RPI because its effects are not as 
foreseeable. 

The ACRC hop)es to use its new- 
found 18-month extension to make 
its stances clear to voters. Nfany are 
concerned about the negative 
impacts the RPI could have on soci- 
ological and public policy research, 
which often relies on state-collect- 
ed data. 

"Social sciences data collection 
would be hampered," said Regent 
Velma Montoya "I don't want pro- 
fessors to be thwarted." 

Others worry about decreased 
state accountability if the RPI ever 
meets voter approval. 

"It's very important for the peo- 
ple in the state of California to 
know if their government is dis- 
criminating against them," said 
Nfichael Harris, assistant director 
for the Lawyers Committee for 
Civil Rights in San Francisco. 

"There's just no good reason to 
become ignorant about things like 
that that are profoundly impor- 
tant," he continued. 
_ Connerly scoffed at any notions 
about hampering research insti- 
tutes dependent on state data. 

"It may impair social science 
researchers who want the govern- 
ment to gather data for them," he 
said "That doesn't mean you can't 
collect it on your own." 

The ACRC also plans on q>end- 
ing the extra time rebuilding its 
campaign war chest, since it has 
spent more than $2 million this 
year alone. 

With reports from the Associated 
Press. 







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BUDGET I Tax 

increase a 
possibility to 
raise funds 

I from page I 

participate in higher education has 
been preserved, signaling a victoiy 
for underrepresented populations 
aiKl students of lower socioeconom- 
ic status. 

"Ihe univCTsity came out looking a 
little better, if in fact these revisions 
made by the legislature hold," said 
Max Elspinoza, senior consultant to 
the assembly budget conuiuttee and 
a VCLA graduate who served as the 
l^C student regent from 1998^. 

In May, Davis proposed to elimi- 
nate funding for the UC College 
Preparatory Initiative (which pro- 
vides oiUine AP courses to students 
who don't have access to them in 
school), the C«itral Valley outreach 
programs, and the K-12 outreach pro- 
grams as well as reduced funding for 
graduate and professional school 

The restoration of outreach 
funds is the only mayor 
change to the UC budget 
even though legislators need 
to close a $23 billion budget 
hole. 



oittzeach. 

Under the new proposal, all of the 
ftinding is restored for these pro- 
gnms except for K-12 outreach, 
which will be partially funded, 
amounting to a recovery of mcMre 
than $20 millicm to outreachnnelated 
frinds. 

Elspinoza, who in May called the 
proposed slash to outreach funds 
"extremely severe" and that there 
was "no way we're going to agree 
with those cuts," said he was reluc- 
tantly satisfied with this new propos- 
al 

"It's hard to be satisfied It was 
imfortunate that these programs 
were targeted to begin with," he said, 
but that preserving outreach funds 
was a "substantial victory." 

And even with m^jor changes to 
the cuts he proposed, Davis wel- 
ccHnes the preservation of education 
fuxK&ng. 

TDavis) is pleased that, overall, 
w* will be able to fully tuiid educii- 
tional programs," said Davis ^>oke9- 
woman Hilary McLean. 

The remainder of the $25 million 
recovered will come firom an 
increase in non-resident tuition, a 
move that will generate at least $4.3 
miUion for the UC budget According 
to the current proposal, fees would 
increase by "at least" 6 percent 

Additional modifications include 
an additional $5.3 million to the 
Student Aid Commission for work- 
study programs, and $4 million in 
additional funding for Cal Grant C 
awards, McLean said. 

\The restoration of outreach funds 
is the only nuyor change to the UC 
budget even though legislators need 
to dose a $23 tnllion budget hole that 
led some to beUeve student fee 
increases were imminent 

"We do not expect^for student fees 
to go up as a result of this budget 
The Governor does not favor fee 
increases and doesn't expect to see 
any," McLean said 

Instead, the cortference commi^ 
tee is considering raising taxes, 
E^inoza said, and that an increase in, 
student fees is "unexpected" 

However, the possibility of a fee 
increase still remains. Paul Mitchell, 
chief consultant to the Assembly 
Committee on Higher Education, 
^)eculated that if it occurred, itj 
would come late in the negotiations. 

"When (legislators) go behind the 
scenes, theyll do thiiigs that are less 
appealing and nobody has time toj 
squash them three or four hours 
later," Mitchell said, acknowledging 
that raising fees is an "unappealing 
option" to legislators, but might be 
considered 

Until the budget is signed, nothing' 
relating the 2002-03 fiscal year is a 
certainty. 

"Everything's on the table, 
because the budget is not yet com- 
plete. Tlie things we've done up until 
this point could all unravel," 
Elspinoza said 

Once the budget bill arrives on his 
desk, Davis has the authority to use a 
lii¥e item veto to eliminate provisions 
he considers out of alignment with 
his own priorities. 

Since the final bill is expected to 
carry substantial changes to the ou^ 
reach cuts he proposed in May, Davis 
may use this power to ac^ust the 
funding to his liking. 

McLean would not speculate 
"what specific action he might take 
to igeC our reserve to the level that is 
responsible," she said Sunday, June 

30, 

THe believes outreach is an impor- 
tant part of our higher education pic- 
ture," she added 



For more on the budget, visU the 
Legislative Analysis Office's home- 
page at tvwwUioca.gov 



HOLIDAY 

from page 1 

celebrate the holiday, but I guess it's a good 
excuse to go party and have family gather- 
ings, and to go to the l)each." 

Fifth-year student Devon Huff agrees. 
With the holiday coming on a Thursday 
night many students can't stay out late and 
celebrate into the weekend. 

"I'm going to be working on my lab 
reports," Huff said "I have lai) on FYidays, so 
I haven't really thoiiglu that far aliead. But I 
don't plan on anything that big." 

While the Independence Day spirit may 
not be readily apparent from Westwood 
Village and l^CLA students. Huff believes 
that patriotism is at a high point for 
American citizens. 

"It's always a day where you feel a lot of 
patriotism and pride for the country, espe- 
cially if you go somewhere and watch the 
fireworks," he said "Then you thiiUc about 



NEWS 



MONDAY. JULY 1. 2002 ■ THE DAILY BRUIN 



how the coimtry has come together since 
Sept 11, and it makes you even more proud 
to be an American, as the cbche goes." 

For students who are looking to watch the 
fireworks this Thursday night. Culver City 
High School will have an hour-long fire- 
works show. Marina Del Rey will have fire- 
works on the harbor, which can be seen 
from nearby Fisherman's Village. Both 
shows start at 9 p.m. and admission is free. 

For students willing to . — 
travel beyond the city 
lights of West Los Angeles 
to see the fireworks. 
Universal City Walk will 
have a "Fourth of July 
Fireworks Spectacular" 
with guest stars and coun- 
try music. Entertainment 
starts at 4:30 p.m. and fire- 
works begin at 9 p.m. 

The Burbaiik Starlight 
Bowl will feature the 
Tonight Show Band at 
6:30 p.m., with pyrotech- 



nics starting at 9 p.m. Admission is from $6- 
$25. 

Huff urges students who are fortunate 
enough to participate in the celebration to go 
out and eiyoy themselves. 

If it weren't for his morning lab class. Huff 
said he would have found "a place that has 
good fireworks, and probably go home and 
hang out with firiends. And then we'd go 
party, drinking, etc., etc.," he said. 



CHECK OUT MORE NEWS STORIES ON THE WEB! 

College Board expands SAT I test with writing, more 
complex math sections 

Alleged car thieves almost run over University Police 

UC, nurses reach contract agreement 

Tracy Davis reflects on year as student regent 

Newsbriefs 

Crimewatch 




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1WINS 

from page 1 



preparing them for separatioa 

Skin expansion will stretch the skin of the 
twins' scalps enough to cover the t)acks of 
their heads after their separation surgery, doc- 
tors hope. 

Surgeons encountered a minor problem 
when inserting one of the balloons, as the 
twins' scalp skin tore in a thin ^k)L The bal- 
loon near the wound, which was stitched iqp, 
will not be inflated until that area fully heals, 
doctors said. This may delay the next surgeiy, 
scheduled originally for some tirne in July. As 
of last week, doctors were still not sure when 
the twins would undergo the next procedure. 

Despite the small problem, overall doctors 
were satisfied with the surgery. 

"We're very pleased," said Dr. Barbara Van 
De W^ele, chief anesthesiologist on the case. 

Rare twins, risky procedure 

Maria de Jesus and Maria Teresa have qp«it 
almost their entire lives in hospitals. In their 
bed, they struggle unsuccessfully to help one 
another stand up. The hold hands often, but 
they cannot meet eyes. Joined at the head, 
they are the rarest of twins. 

Craniopagus twin - those joined at the head 
- make up only 2 percent of coiyoined twins, 
according to the Med Center statement And 
their separation is one of the most dangerous 
of all operations. 

Doctors have performed cranial separa- 
tions only five times in the past 10 years, and 
not aD twins have survived. This is the first 
time the procedure has happened at UCIA If 
one of the balloons breaks or if the veins run- 
ning through their heads cannot be separated, 
the girls could suffer brain damage. 

But UCLA neurosurgeon Joige LazareCE^ 
who lobbied the ho^ital to accept the case, 
has confidence in the girls to pull throu^ 

"They are really tough girls," he said at a 
press conference on June 24. T am absolutely 
thrilled and convinced they will do great" ' 

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VIEWPOINT 



MONDAY. JULY 1, 2002 ■ THE DAILY BRUIN 5 



DAILY BRUIN 

Serving the UCLA commmity since 1919 



Editorial Board 

CL'ai'htemoc ORTE.iA. Editor in Chief 

Corey McEleney. Managing Editor 

Cody Cass. Viewpoint Editor 

Kelly Raybi rn, Neus Editor 

Edward Chiao. Stc^ff Representative 

Amy Frye, Stqff Representative 

Derek Lazzaro, Stqff p utve 

Robert Salomja. 5tq// .. , ,. lative 

Amanda Schapel. Stajf Representative 



tUnder God' is 
unconstitutional 

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United 
States of Ameiica, and to the republic for 
which it stands, one nation, under Allah, 
indivisible, with liberty and justice for alL 

An overwhelming m^yority of Americans 
would surelj oppose public schools asking 
•children to recite this pledge. But smce the 
in^iority of the United States' population is 
Christian, Americans have no problem bar- 
gaining away people's right to a govem- 
inent with a separate church and state for 
their own benefit The Ninth Circuit Cknirt 
of Appeals finally ruled it uiKx»nstitutional 
for teachers to lead the Pledge of 
Allegiance in public schools last week 
beonse the phrase "urwier God" violates 
the First Amendment 

Historically, the Bill of Rights has kept 
chi«ch and state separate to avoid corrup- 
tion and persecution that could ensue if 
the religious leaders in our country also 
made the law. In this case, the bulk of our 
govemm«it and the m^yority of the 
Supreme Court think it's fine for the United 
States to act illegally. Evidence of this atti- 
tude comes not only from the backlash 
agifctst the pledge ruling - by President 
Geoifge W. Bush, Gov. Gray Davis and 99 
out <rf 100 senators - but also from the 
Supreme Court's declaration last week that 
school vouchers are constitutional. 

Many private schools, which the vouch- 
ers would support have a specific religious 
orientation, institute prayer in school, and 
often refuse to teach certain sci«ice topics 
and other academic subjects they deem 
inapixupriate. Su{^x)rting vouchers links 
the rfiurch and state together via taxpayer 
dollars, which takes public money out of 
pubbc services and gives it to religiously- 
oriented institutions. In other words, it 
mixes religk)n aiKi the state. 

Other practices in the upper levels of 
our government violate the First 
Amendment as well. F*rayer is said before 
each ccxigressional conventi<Mi, "God save 
the United States" is stated before each 
Supreme Court hearuig, aiid the govpm- 
ment pniiis '*li\ G<xi We T^ust" on currerK:y 
- a real distinction betweoi religion and 
government would mean going beyond just 
removing binder God" from the Pledge of 
Allegiance; it would mean eliminating all of 
these practices. Those who argue that this 
ooune of action is petty are a sad testa- 
ment to the casual way in which some 
Americans regard their Constitution. 

Forcing religion on people is as bad as 
prohibiting it - separation of church aitd 
state goes both ways, allowing people to ' 
practice the religicm of their choice but 
protecting them frtwn an oppressive reli- 
gious government 

SOU, President Bush defends the ^mder 
God' phrase claiming it refers to a 'Miniver- 
sal G<xl" - he forgets there are atheists, 
polytheists and Buddhists in America. And 
he forgets Congress was referring ^)ecifi- 
caUy to the Christian God when they added 
the two words in 1954 because they were 
afrnd of communists indoctrinating 
Ameiiicans - the irony speaks for itself. 

If the Supreme Court has any integrity, it 
will s((^ acting as a puppet to partisan 
politicians aiKl support something 
Americans should value more than the 
phrase "Muider God" - the Constitution. 



SAT revisions, vouchers won 't equalize education 




Tim Kudo 

iudoQmeda^jiAAdu 



Given last week's Supreme Court deci- 
sion favoring vouchers, perhaps legis- 
lators should consider the following as 
a prompt for the new SAT writing section: 

"You will have a 
decade to plan and exe- 
cute real educational 
policy reform with little 
accountability to aver- 
age parents. Before you 
begin accomplishing 
anything, bicker and 
make allegations, and 
plan on how you can 
stonewall read reform. 
Your solution should be 
as nonsensical, as parti- 
san and as useless as 
you can make it" 

Last week, educatcio touted newly 
announced SAT I changes as vital to making 
college more equitable, while conservative 
reformers called the voucher decision the 
most important since Brown v. Board of 
Education. But in the midst of political and 
media hype, parents and students shouldn't 
be fooled into thinking these superficial 
reforms will help their children get a better 
education. 

Changes to the SAT I aimounced last 
week will replace analogies with a writirig 
section and make the math section tourer, 
but they fail to fix the racial disparities in 
scoring that are the SAT Fs most chronic 
problem Rather, UC President Richard 
Atkinson - who qpeartieaded these changes 
by essentially threatening The College 



Board with the prospect of this university 
dropping the test as it stood - seems to 
hope the so-called improvements will lead 
to changes in K-12 schools throughout the 
country by forcing them to emphasize writ 
ing and harder math. 

What Atkinson seems to be missing is the 
group of tests that college-bound students 
already have to take that include these 
changes: the SAT U. That test has been 
required for years for entrance into most 
universities, yet many schools continue to 
inadequately prepare their students for col- 
lege. 

Though Atkinson and others say SAT^ 
indicate how well students will do in their 
first year of college, at a UC campus under 
the quarter system, diligence has as much 
to do with performance as intelligence, let 
alone mere performance on a test 

The voucher decision, on the other hand, 
paves the way for changes in K-12 educa- 
tion that advocates say will strike at the 
heart of performance differences on tests 
like the SAT. If federal proposals supported 
by President Bush pass, vouchers will give 
parents tax credits toward private schools, 
drastically changing the way students are 
educated. 

Democrats fear such measures will speU 
the end for public education and adversely 
affect poorer and middle-income families, 
while simply giving a subsidy to more 
wealthy families who can already afford 
costly private education. 

But in many ways vouchers merely mir- 
ror the success of higher education funding 



systems. In this state, for example, taxpay- 
ers support the University of California and 
California State University, while also fund- 
ing scholarships for students who choose to 
attend private schools like Stanford or 
Loyola Marymount 

The argument should not center around 
the benefits or detriments of socialized edu- 
cation, the separation of church and state 
or the evils of private industry - it should 
be over how best to educate American chil- 
dren. The best way to do this is to invest in 
American education, whether it's private or 
public. 

Highly funded private schools may better 
serve students, but that doesn't mean public 
schools can't do the same with adequate 
funding. Once again, higher education 
shows this: public schools with sufficient 
funding, like the University of California, 
are able in large part to compete with top- 
notch private schools. 

The problem with K-12 education, partic- 
ulaiiy in California, is that it is grossly 
underfunded. This state ranks 48th in the 
union in funding to K-12 education at $5,603 
per student de^ite nearly 10 years of 
increased spending. 

Conservatives argue that blindly throw- 
ing money into education doesn't solve the 
problem TTiey're right, but California 
schools, at least, already have sufficient 
accountability standards and policies in 
place. What they don't have is money. 

Unless total funding increases, simply 
moving money to private schools will do lit- 
tle to increase the overall quality of educa- 



tion. Rather, it will only allow parents cm 
the margin to put their children and money 
into private schools they couldnt otherwise 
afford. This may help those students, but it 
will also hurt the students left behind 

At this point there are two options: either 
cut funding from other state programs, or 
raise taxes. Given the financial situation of 
the state, there is little fat to trim that hasnt 
already been cut, so it's time to look else- 
where. 

If President Bush chooses to toiit a 
voucher program that could lead to the 
largest federally implemented c-ducation 
reform in decades, he must also increase 
federal aid to education. 

If the poor could finance education in 
their districts, we wouldn't have these prob- 
lems. The only place left to look is the rich. 
Currently the maximum federal income tax 
charged to the richest Americans is roughly 
40 percent on incomes over $288,350, just 
over half of what it was before Ronald 
Reagan was president 

Legislators complain that raising this 
ceiling would constitute punitive taxation, 
but even after a tax of 60 percent, the rich 
would still be rich. Leaving millionaires 
with millions (or at least hundreds of thou- 
sands) isn't punitive - taxing a single parent 
of two who makes $20,000 is. 

If the poor could pay for better schools, 
they would, but they cant As long as our 
tax laws favor the rich, so will our educa- 
tion system. The answer should be clear to 
our policy makers, even if they went to pub- 
lic schools. 



'Pledge' ruling contradicts constitution 




Joel 
Schwartz 

jKhMTtzSmedaictaaii 



A Jewish legend speaks of a 
town called Helm, where an 
angel carrying a sack of fools 

flew low over a hill, tearing the sack 

and populating the town with imbe- 
ciles. The legend 

is true, except it 

seems to be 

Telegraph Hill 

that ripped the 

sack, pouring 

fools into San 

FYandscoBay. 

For only in a 

place of com- 
plete idiocy can 

a court outlaw 

"under God" 

fiDm the Pledge 

of Allegiance, by 

deeming the 
phrase unconsti- 
tutional 

TTiese mistaken judges and any- 
one who may agree with them are 
in dire need of a refreshment 
course in U.S. political history. 
Ironically, trying to be constitution- 
al by barming "under God" because 
it "endorses religion" is patently 
unconstitutional If one actually 
understands the Constitution and 
places a greater emphasis on its 
principles than on a political agen- 
da, it is impossible to reach these 
judges' conclusion. 

The words of the First 
Amendment regarding religion are, 
"Congress shall make no law 
re^)ecting an establishment of reli- 
gion, or prohibiting the fi-ee ei.er- 
dse thereof." Nowhere does the 
Constitution prohibit religion firom 
the public arena. The only way the 
inclusion of "under God" could be 
considered a law re^)ecting an 
establishment of religion, and 
therefore unconstitutional, is if 
children in every cIassro< »ni wCTe 
forced to say these words. During a 
seven-year stint as an atheist, 1 left 
out the "offensive" words and 
nobody came to take me away, nor 



was I chastised. | 

In contrast this new ruling con- 
flicts with the part of the First 
Amendment that bars "prohibiting 
the free exercise (of religion)." By 
specifically banning the words, the 
court is telling children that by law, 
they are not allowed to mention 
God. This is exactly the type of 
abuse of frieedom of religion and 
speech that the Bill of Rights was 
created to abolish. 

And of course the law of unin- 
tended consequences is always hid- 
ing in the shadows, ready to rear 
its u^ head and pounce on our 
fi*eedoms anytime more unintelli- 
gent laws are passed If this tragic 
niling is upheld, then the next logi- 
cal step is to ban the word "God" 
completely frx)m any type of public 
usage. After all, says the judge, just 
saying "God" is endorsing religion. 

Therefore, if one agrees with 
this ruling, then one must say 
good-bye to any theological studies 
at any public university or school. 
Jewish Studies with Rabbi Seidler- 
Feller at UCLA? Shalom and good 
riddance. Tb hell with the Wstoiy 
of witchcraft and Christianity with 
Tteo Ruiz, for paganism is a religion 
too. Rene Descartes can kiss his 
meditations good-bye because they 
dare to provide arguments for the 
existence of God 

In fact, all philosophy, religion, 
history, literature and science 
classes will have to be heavily cen- 
sored, since we do not want the 
poor children to be indoctrinated 
with any religious ideas in a public 
setting. 

This idea may seem absurd, but 
it is ideologically similar to, if not 
indistinct frx)m, the mind-set that 
would disallow God frt>m the 
Pledge of Allegiance. 

Unfortunately this mind-set usu- 
ally held by the radical left is 
infecting mainstream society with 
its silliness. Hints of it were distin- 
guished when the press lambasted 



George W. Bush for saying Jesus 
Christ was his favorite philosopher 
Elven more was made dear with 
the condemnation of the phrase 
"God bless America" by many radi- 
cal left wing columnists alter Sept 
11. 

But what these so-called protec- 
tors of fr^eedom completely missed 
is that without the idea of CJod, 
there would have never been an 
United States. Tliomas Jefferson 
put it very eloquently when he 
penned, "We hold these truths to 
be self-evident, that all men are 
created equal, that they are 
endowed by their Creator with cer- 
tain unalienable Rights, that among 
these are Life, Liberty and the pur- 
suit of Happiness." 

This radical concept called fr-ee- 
dom, embraced by our forefathers, 
is the idea that people live for 
themselves, not some tyraimical 
state or master It was derived 
frt)m Deism. Locke, Voltaire, 
Rousseau, Paine and Jefferson, 
some of whom were harsh critics 
of organized religion, were all 
Deists. Tliey believed that the uni- 
versal rights of humanity came 
from a divine origin. Without a 
Creator that has endowed objec- 
tive ri^ts and wrongs, there is no 
way to say that fr^eedom is better 
than slavery. 

While it is true that religion has 
caused much human suffering and 
continues to do so (Tsdiban any- 
one?), the idea of a single source of 
human rights has provided much 
liberation. Tlie abolitionists and 
first feminists were Christian, and 
Martin Luther King Jr was a man 
of the cloth. 

So come this July 4, watch the 
fireworks and keep your eyes sky- 
ward as you thank God that you 
are free to do as you please, even if 
you are an atheist or agnostic. And 
hope that the foolishness of certain 
San FYandsco judges does not con- 
taminate the rest of this country. 




JASON LIU/Daily Bruin Staff 



LETTERS 



Profisssors could 
learn from Israel 

It is with amazement that I 
read of the UC professors that 
want to force the university to 
divest itself of any company 
doing business with Israel pur- 
portedly with the purpose of 
sending a message to the 
"apartheid state" ("165 profes- 
sors petition for divestment 
from Lsrael," News, June 24). 

The so-called professors 
would do much to learn fix)m 
that "apartheid" state. Israel's 
army and Si^reme Court are 
empowered to protect its Arab 
citizens. Compare this with 



Lebanon where 182 Marines 
were massacred in the Beirut 
Barracks. Or Syria which 
expeUed its Jewish community 
in the 1970s to the silence of 
your professors. Or Saudi Arabia 
where LJ.S. troops protecting its 
dictators could not celebrate 
Christmas. Or of course our so- 
called ally, Egypt which in 1958 
imprisoned all of its Jewish citi- 
zens prior to expelling 99 per- 
cent of them (my wife among 
them). 

In Israel it is common for 
50,000 people to march for 
peace. I suggest that when 
50,000 Arabs march for peace, 
there will be peace within a 
week. 

JeTNy Krantz, DOS 



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6 VHL WUIY BmJIN ■ MONDAY, JULY 1, 2002 



ARTSi&ENTEffTAINMENT 




**Not)orkMis C AO."" 
Directed by Lorene MjuJuulo 
Starring Miu-garet Cho 

«^t ^ ^ ^1 

Margaret Cho does it again 
with her latest performance film. 
A follow-up to her hit, "Fm the 
One that I Want," Cho's newest 
fUm represents a return to pure 
atand-up even while she infuses it 
with political and social mes- 
sages that allow it to rise above 
tile normal doldrums of comic 
aditick. 

Filmed in Seattle, Cho's film 
btgins with a hilarious crack on 
how she's helping out the fire- 
flfhters at Ground Zero. In char- 
adeiislic Cho fashion, her joke is 
nunchy and sets the tone for the 
entire film, which is basically a 
comedy of sexual errors. 

As a person who has become a 
symbol for many segments of 
society (overweight people, 
Asians, gays and lesbians, and 
women), Cho makes sure she has 
something for everyone. She 
does straight jokes and gay jokes 
and lesbian jokes. When she does 
the straight jokes, she even 
adoMwledges the fact that her 
gay audience is annoyed and 
cant wait for it to end. She does 
impressions of bimbos, a shy 
video store clerk and uncouth 
straight men, all with dead-on 
exactitude. 

Usually, the funniest of Cho's 
jokes and impressions is her 
mother, who is still hung up on 
the 'gayneas" around her. In this 
mo'vie, Cho uses the impression 
(^her mother to tell a story about 
Cho's father's gay experimce. A 
pn^-concert interview with Cho's 
parents adds depth to the film's 
documentary feel and shows 
how realistic Cho's impressions 



Cho remains fiinny as ever and 
maintains her cult following with 
Jokes that will no doubt be 
echoed by her loyal fans. In fact, 
the film begins with fans doing 
taiitations of her imitations of her 
mother and reciting lines from 
her previous stand-up moments, 
such as the "Ass Master" routine. 
Cho delivers the goods. 

Yet, Cho also retains the 
monologue quality of her previ- 
ous film, which seemed to be 
therapeutic and personal rather 
than just a bunch of fart jokes. 
Near the film's conclusion, Cho 
makes a series of political and 



social statements that are both 
strong and affirming to her audi- 
ence, who, she admits, is made 
up of people who need a place to 
belong. The ending's seriousness 
puts a surprising cap on the 
entire show, making one realize 
that her jokes are ultimately 
about accepting who you are and 
being happy with it After seeing 
her on stage, perhaps the other 
social rejects will have the 
courage to accept themselves as 
she has done. 

-HouHird Ho 

""Sex and LacU*' 
Directed by Julio Medem 
Starring IVistan Ulloa and 
Paz Vega 

If you loved "Y Tu Mama 
Tambien," you'll love "Sex and 
Lucia." It is just as provocative- 
ly sexy, honest and emotional. 
While not poUtical, "Sex and 
Lucia" creates a wonderful tale 
of interlocking characters told 
in a non-linear style of flash- 
backs akin to Christopher 
Nolan's "Memento." 

Yet, this film connects more 
to the films that came even 
before "Y Tu Mama Tambien" 
and "Memento." Its beauty and 
power echoes Fellini's style and 
other classic European films. 
Shot in a bright, over-saturated 
exposure, the light of the film is 
blinding, looking a little like a 
Spielberg film but with more 
emotional complexity and sub- 
tlety. 

In the film, an accident has 
destroyed a love relationship 
between a writer and his sexy 
girlfriend. Slowly, their pasts 
are revealed and we see the 
characters come to grips with 
their regrets and reconcile. 

In a word, "Sex and Lucia" is 
anti-Hollywood, delivering 
highly personal stories with a 
no-holds-barred approach to 
filmmaking. 

Each shot is exquisite, using 
a variety of camera angles, 
movements and points of view 
that make Hollywood filmmak- 
ing look like the formulaic trash 
that it often is. Certain shots, 
such as clouds moving over the 
moon or a girl swimming 
toward her mermaid mother, 
will haunt you long after this 
movie is over. 

There are only two caveats to 
the film. The first is the pace; 
the film crawls until about half- 
way through, when the pieces 
of the puzzle start to come 
together. The other is the overt 
sexuality, which may bother 
some of the squeamish who 
don't want to see so much nudi- 
ty and sex within such a short 
time span. 

But these missteps do not 
harm the overall emotion of the 
film, which should leave the 
more sensitive viewers in tears. 
The sexual freedom and hon- 
esty of this film only adds to the 
film's ultimate message, which 
is love's ability to overcome a 
murky past. 

-Howard Ho 



r 

By Howard Ho 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
hho@medla.ucla.8du 

In Margaret Cho's new film, "Notorious C.H.O.," 
she describes a cross-dressing, homosexual cou- 
ple that mentored her through high school as 
"crouching drag queen, hidden faggot" TTiough 
hilarious, Cho's state- 
ment mixing Asian and 
gay culture is just one 
example of how her mul- 
tiple identities play out 
on the stage. 

Cho's "Notorious" 
show is her take on femi- 
nism, represented by rap 
artists such as Lil' Kim 
and Missy Elliot. Like 
those artists, Cho takes 
explicit female sexuality and serves it up with 
style. 

"I love hip-hop. 'Notorious' is kind of just a 
funny moniker because I don't seem notorious at 
all. I thought it would be good to sort of pretend 1 
was cool," Cho said ! 

This seems strange coming from the woman 
who is often seen as the epitome of Asian cool. 
After all, on the short list of Asian Americans in 
media, she ranks high, having been in several 
movies and her own sitcom and having written a 
best-selling book. 

Her stand-up is not for the faint of heart ^e 
talks about fistmg, female and male genitalia, and 
going to a straight sex club that spedalizes in 
sadomasochism. 

"As a performer, Fm really strong and powerftil 
and aggressive. I can be really mean, but also real- 
ly funny and energetic. In life, Tvn not really like 
that Fm really shy and quiet and kind of boring. 
All the stuff I talk about in my show is true, but it's 
not the same person onstage," Cho said 

The issue of id«itity is very important for Cho, 
who is Asian, female, bisexual, and overweight In 
other words, she is the repressed minority on 
almost every level Yet, this also gives her material 
for her shows, which often deal with her various 
identities, and gives her more credibility when she 
encourages others to acc^t themselves for who 
they are. 

"Everyone else's comedy is aH just jokes, but I 
have real agenda there, which I think is a really 
great thing. It's all about finding peace with our- 
selves and finding a sense of equality in the worid, 
no matter what our race or our gender or our sex- 



uality," Cho said 

As an Asian, Cho wants to help break through 
all the stereotypes of Asians. She deals with radsm 
in her show with a comment on how her greatest 
dream as a child was to be an extra on ''M*A*S*H.'' 
Her next show, which she is currently working on, 
is prospectively about being Asian. 

"My new show is a lot about racial identities, but 




Margaret Cho's new stand-up comedy film 
explores sexuafity, racism, Sept. 11 attacks 




Wellspring 

Cho's newest concert film, "Notorious C.H.O.." is cur- 
rently playing at the Landmark Nuart Theater. 

it's still in the begiiming processes," Cho said 

"I think there needs to be more of a push for 
Asian American men in the entertairunent industry. 
Jackie Chan and Jet Li are these weird super- 
heroes. They're totally not human beings, and 
they're also not Asian American," Cho added. 

Certainly, Cho has done her fair share of putting 
Asian Americans into mainstream media. Her 



short-lived sitcom on ABC, "All-American Family,'' 
was the first to have an entire Asian American cast 
During the show's run, Cho dealt with tremendous 
pressure, such as a crash diet that damaged her 
kidneys and dealing with an e3q)ert who was sup>- 
posed to make her show more authentically Asian. 
The cancellation of the show led to a period of 
depression for Cho until she came to terms with it 

in her monologue, 
Tm the One Thai I 
Want" 

That show 

became a hit film, 
a best-selling 

book, as well as 
the revival of her 
career. Its success 
is something Cho 
hopes to repro- 
duce with a book 
version of the "Notorious CH.O." as well as the 
film version, which was shot documentaiy-st^e in 
Seattle. 

In the film, Cho does not shy away firom any- 
thing, even the potentially touchy subject of the 
Sept 1 1 attacks, which she used in her stand-iq) 
act just a few days after it happened. 

There was a lot of sadness and this idea was 
that there was going to be a death of irony and 
that people weren't going to be allowed to joke 
about stuff. I didn't want to make fun of anyone 
necessarily, but to joke about it in a way that could 
break up the tension around it," Cho said 

Cho is currently at peace with her life. Her par- 
ents, who also make an s^pearance in "Notorious 
C.H.O.," have accepted Cho's act and even seem 
to ei\joy their newfound celebrity. Cho also made 
a guest appearance on the show "Sex in the City" 
and hopes to do so again. Perhaps more impor- 
tantly, Cho is settling down with her life and find- 
ing happiness in her quiet home. 

"I'm rebuilding this house that I bou^t in the 

early part of the year. It's slowly being turned into 

a kind of palace. I always have been a homebody 

because I travel so much that when I come home I 

want to stay home," Cho said 

As for whether she could do another sitcom, 
Cho does not rule it out entirely but she has clear- 
ly learned lessons. 

"It would have to be the ri^t thing. I wouldn't 
take something uiUess I had complete ccHitrol over 
everything," Cho said 

With the kind of power she exudes in her show 
and the self-acceptance she embodies, Cho is in 
her prime. 



To allow art its influence is to really live 



Srup. Buzz. Trim. Snap. Pop. No, 
this is not a Rice Krispies I 
commericial. Rather these ' 
were the sounds made as I lost my 
flowing mane Sunday. Tlie picture 
of the long-haired journalist you see 
before you now 
looks nothing 
like the baldy I 
have become. 
This is me say- 
ing, "My body is 
my granite slab 
through which I 
h<^^ to discov- 
er my true 
shape." 

The shift 
fi'om massive 
amounts of head 
hair to none 
may seem a bit 
drastic, but 
sometimes we need to be extreme. 
After all, my life is just moving from 
one thing to the next, as I plan things 
out for a future that may never 
come. As John Lermon said, "Life is 
what happens to you while you're 
busy making other plans." j 

In other words, there are a few 
times when overwhelming circum- 




Howard 
Ho 



stances cause you to change your 
entire lifestyle and way of viewing 
the worid. Growing long hair and 
then cutting it has no doubt changed 
my lifestyle. FYom now on, I will 
never have the oily, itchy mess that 
happened when I didn't wash the 
spa^etti and I will never have to 
brush it, tearing some out due to 
frustrating knots. FU never again feel 
the subtle motion of knocking my 
hair back in the wind or be able to 
run my hand through it with water. 1 
will miss these things. 

Going bald, I imagine, will be like 
losii\g a limb. I can just see myself 
trying to grab my hair only to realize 
that it's not there. The shock alone 
makes the cut worthi«^e. 

Ttwnk about how many shocking 
things you've done lately. Things that 
push the limits of your emotions. 
Often without these shocks, life 
would be a solidifying glacier day 
after day, each day moving toward 
that ultimate destination. 

What is art if not using media to 
shock an audience into reexamining 
their lives, their loves and even their 
hairdos? In this case, my hair is art, 
shocking all those around me, 
including my mother, forcing people 



to reconsider who I am, which ulti- 
mately allows me to reconsider who 
I am. It's throwing rocks into a pond 
and seeing where the waves will go. 

In fact, art is identity. It reinforces 
certain ways of thinking, such that 
propaganda would be impossible 
without skiUed craft^)eople churn- 
ing out icons. Catholicism would 
lose virtually all its powers without 
those huge cathedrais, the costumed 
priests, the crucifixes and, of course, 
peiiiaps the single most influential 
piece of literature ever written, the 
Bible. 

Similarly, going to UCLA means 
getting acquainted with the 8-clap, 
wearing blue-and-gold shirts and 
caps, and listeniiig to the band play 
the UCLA victory march ad nause- 
um. On the other hand, if you wore 
red (USC's color if you didnt kiww), 
you'd be violating the strict codes of 
etiquette. Art becomes identity. 

Music is perhaps the best source 
of identity since, with the internet, 
MP3s and peer-to-peer servers, one 
can now experience virtually any 
type of music instantaneously. As 
one of my professors would say, it 
enables people to try on different 
identities risk-free. 



So the cookie-cutter suburbanite 
can see what it's like to be a ^am 
goth with a little Marilyn Manson 
blasting in the aural canaL A raver 
can become romantic opera lover 
with a few arias sung by Andrea 
Bocelli. 

Each type of music teUs you how 
to move your body. Rap is all about 
moving to the groove with syncopa- 
tioits. ftance is ail about pretending 
that you don't even have a body, but 
are a free-flowing being in a sea of 
happiness. Classical tells^ its listener 
to not move at all, but instead to sit 
silently while the emotion and intel- 
lect of the music tell a story without 
words. 

Art is intimately cormected to the 
body and to think otherwise would 
be to engage in puritanical denial 
Since art is also identity and your 
identity is also the body ... what was 
I writing about again? 

Anyway, the point is that it's all 
intercormected in this beautiful way. 
Take advantage of what artistic 
potential you have to live dangerous- 
ly, to shock others and more impor- 
tantly, to shock and change yourself. 
When you've lost this ability, death 
cannot be too far away. 



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1762 WMtwood Blvd. #460 (t>«tw««n Wilshlre & Santa Monica Bl.) 

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For Appointment Call: (310) 474-3765 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND STAFF 
VISION CARE INFORMATION 

The offices of Dr. Jon D. Vogel Optometrisf of Village Eyes 

Opromerry, hove welcomed faculty, staff and students fronn 

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satisfied patients. Ask around: many of your fellow faculty 

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WWW.GIBLIEACTION. com/puffy 

I Japanese superstar duo Puffy play their brand of genre-breaking, catchy pop 
I tunes at the Roxy on the first stop of their U.S. tour. 

Japan's hit pop duo 
Pu^ sweeten up L.A. 



By Alex Palmer 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
apalmer@media.ucla.edu 

Japanese duo Puffy Amiyumi 
march to the beat of their own 
drum. Actually, they march to a 
sugary blend of everyone else's 
drums. But it works, and boy do 
the Japanese love it. 

Puffy Amiyumi will be playing 
their first U.S. concert this 
Saturday night at the Roxy Theatre 
in West Hollywood. It will give 
American audiences a chance 
check out Japan's biggest musical 
act 

But audiences be warned: Ami 



Onuki and Yumi Yoshimura, the 
members of Pufly, aren't used to 
small clubs like the Roxy. In their 
native country, the two regularly 
sell out entire arenas. They also 
movfe millions of albums (over 14 
million sold), their songs appear in 
more commercials than Moby's, 
and the two host their own hugely 
popular TV variety show "Pa-Pa- 
Pa-Pa-Puffy." 

Known simply as Puffy in Js^pan 
(but urged by a certain P. Diddy to 
change their name in the States), 
the two were brought together by a 
record label in 1995. By 1P96 they 

PUFFY I Page 7 



m 



''riilri-^TTtif' ^^'^-^^- 



t 



PUFFY 

from page I 

had a massive hit, "Asia No 
Junshin- (True Asia") on their 
hands. Their popularity has only 
grown. 

But, as is the case with so many 
foreign acts, Puffy has yet to break 
mto the U.S. market. Their tour 
that kicks off at the Roxy is part of 
Puffy s push to capture Americans' 
ears and promote their second 
stateside album, "An Illustrated 
History." But the women aren't 
that worried about succeeding in 
the United States 

"We are really looking forward 
to playing in front of an American 
audience, but we do really well in 
Ja|>an, so it's not like it's doK)r-<iie 
orj anything like that," the non- 
BngUsh speaking Onuki said to 
Flaunt magazine. 

The duo is aiming to get 
America's attention on their own 
terms, in their own language and 
with their own style. The petite 
pop stars shy away from the 
Britney/Madonna formula of inno- 
cent ballads and raunchy dance 
tracks. Instead, Puffy throws itself 
into a hodgepodge of genres and 
styies. 

•An Illustrated History" jumps 
through more musical eras than 
Britney's Pepsi commercials. 
Borrowing the sensibilities of 
soigs as far-ranging as "You Can't 
Hurry Love," "Ticket to Ride" and 
"Dancing Queen." f*uffy devours it 
all, seeing no difference between 
Robert Palmer, the Who or Gloria 
Estefan. It's all just about hooks 
and the catchy chord changes to 
them. 

The music I want to make is 
anything that I can have fun with 
and eiyoy listening to," the non- 
En|Ush speaking Yoshimura told 
AP magazine. 

The result is pop music that is 
instantly familiar and joyously 
silly. You know that the back- 
ground "la la la's" are going to kick 
in on verse two, but that's the 
point 

Pufly's sound is fine-timed by 
Andy Sturmer, the former drum- 
mer of '90s pop group Jellyfish, 
and Tamio Okudia, a Japanese rocK 
star in his own right These varied 
talents and cultural influences 
come together to form the hard to 
define Puffy sound. 

Like any decent pop group. 
Puffy's look is as crucial as its 
sound 

Tlie J-pop princesses are just as 
indiscriminate in their fashion 
influences as they are with musical 
ones, sportuig artfully nppeii jtaua, 
cu£6e4 up a few inches, along with 
the occasional cowboy hat or 
fuzaQ^ pink sweater. Their video for 
"Boogie Woogie No. 5" unapologet- 
ically mirrors a Gap commercial 
with its white background and 
choreographed dancers. 

"An Illustrated History" doesn't , 
take long to make one forget that 
the girls are singing in Japanese. 
The riffs and hooks are meant to 
be so toe-tappingly catchy that the 
listener gets lost in the sugar rush. 
You aren't sup^>osed to think about 
the meaning of the lyrics, just that 
the group doesn't care about the 
historical or cultural meaning 
behind the styles from which they 
borrow. 

That's because amid the musical 
pilfering lies an innocence and 
genuine joy to Puffy Amiyumi that 
contrasts with America's image- 
conscious, barely-legal divas. 
Satiirday's show at the Roxy will 
be a rare opportunity for American 
audiences to see exactly that - that 
what's cooking in Japan^is a little 
sweeter than American dishes, but 
without all the artificial flavoring. 



ART8<fiEirTERrAINMErrr 



EDITOR'S PICK 



Following 




MONDAY, JULY 1. 2002 • THE BMLY 



Q 




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Teeth White 



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1 . Over Bite 




2. Spacing 3. Open Bite 



rOLi'MBIA tkimar 



So you've seen "Insomnia," 
director Christopher Nolan's 
emotional tale of corruption 
starring Al Pacino, and 
"Memento," Nolan's virtuoso 
film about the fragile nature of 
mepfiory and identity. But even 
before those, Nolan created 
his first film, "Following." 

"Following" is about Bill's 
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strangers until Cobb, a thief, 
catches hun and turns him into 
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Dyes? CDmo? 

4. Cross Bite 



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UCLA Summer Sessions 2002 



^ 



an urban legend is not a 
sports utility vehicle. 




,?i DiCTiLril Virion f''n"na»»ers 
^ w'li,! i.n / tLlv. IF Handbook 



t. n HARVEY ISLAMIC SPAIN, 



jfiTO 



This summer, explore the rhythms and patterns of culture, old and new. 
Study the popular arts, folklore, and dance through our engaging series 
of World Arts and Cultures courses, listed below: 



strategies t^. 



■".sfiil Es»«)vs 



■ *ri«tlk«r 



iNi MORRISON 

iHt ncv rsi f rr 



s lr\ ♦« fir ||>i «} H< 



SesslofiA (June 24 - August 2) 

M22 



Session C (August 5 - September 13) 



135 

H9 



Introduction to American Folklore Studies 
Same as Folklore and Mythology Mis 

African Popular Arts 

Dance In the MuHlcuHural U.S. 



I 



M22 Introduction to American Folklore Studies 
Same as Folklore and Mythology Mis 

Mi22 introduction to Folklore 

Same as Folklore and Mythology M101 

C142 Myth, Magic and Mind 

C242 Myth. Magic and Mind 



For more Summer Sessions information, visit www.summer.uclaedu or the online Schedule of 
Classes at www.regi$trar.ucla.edu/schedule. Enroll now through URSA Online at www.ursa.ucla.edu. 
Campus parking arnl on-campu$ homing are available: www.housing.ucla.edu/summer. Financial 
aid is available: www.fao.uclaedu. 




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Cinenial5 


^^ ^ Spider-Man ff>G-1^ 
Mon-Tua 11:10 2.00 4:50 740 10:30 


Cinema 16 


Space Station 30 (G) IMAX Theatre 
Mon-Tua 10:15 lJ:45 3:15 5.45 



AMX)CMEMA 



>(R> 

THX OoawOMM 
Mon Tua (400) laiO 

My Btg F«i Greek MMdng (PG) 

THX Oot>yOlaM 

Mon-Tue (1 1 20 1 45 4 30) 7 10 »40 



MONN> 



&^ §3-1741 



Bad Company (PG- 13) 

THX Oo«>yO«aiW 

Mon Tua (12 40) 7 20 



Sunehme Stale (PG 13) 
Mon-Inu (12:30) 345 7 00 10 10 

V Tu Mama TamMan 
Mon-Thu (1200) 2 35 5 10 7 45 10:15 

Mon-Thu (1 35) 4 25 7 ISIlSS 

The Emperor s New CkMhee 
(1 40)4 20 7 00 9 40 



Cinamae TheBoumeldenmy(P6-13) 

Mon Tue 11:00*11 30 1 45 -2 15 4 30»5(X) 

7 15 •745 10:00 -10 30 



Onamar 



-lK»l 



Scooby-Ooo (PG) 

• nraclarl HM SpaoM OgM Cln«w Pr—r— Ion 

-Tua 10O0 •11:30 12 10 •I 40 2 20 ^3:50 

4:30 •6 00^8 10^10 20 



Cinamal7 Ultimate X The Movie (PG) MAX Theater 

Mon Tue 1 1 30 2O0 4:30 



Enjoy the 
Moy/iesH 



AMC 



Westwood 



1 BIlE. of westwood 

(310) 777-RLM #330 Jewanna Mann (PG-13) 

Tue 4:15 9:50 

WtndtalkarB (R) 
Mon Tue 1:00 10 00 

At)0tita8oy(PG-13) 
Mon-Tue 1 45 4:45 7:30 10:10 

Divine Secrets of the Yh Yb Sisterhood (PG-13) 
Mon-Tue 4:00 7:00 

Scooby-Doo (PG) 
Mon-Tue 130 4 30 7 ?0 9 40 

Insomnia (R) 
Tue 1 15 7 10 

NOW YOU CAN PRINT YOUR TICKETS AT HOME ON 
FANDANG0.COM 

Beverly Hills 

Beverly Connection 

La Clenega at Beverly Blvd. 

(310)659-5911 

4 hours validated parking $i at Box Office 

Undercover Brother (PG- 1 3) 

Mon 12:15 2 30 4 45 1000 

Tue 12 15 2 30 4 45 7 30 9:50 

The First $20 Million is Always the Hardest 
Mon-Tue 100 4 15 7 10 10 00 

Minority R«)on (R) 

0n2Screen8 

Mon 12:06 12:45 3:15 4:00 6:30 7 15 9:45 10.30 

Tue 12:05 12:45 3:15 4O0 6:30 9:45 10:30 

ScoobyOoo (PG-13) 
Mon-Tue 12:30 3 00 5 30 8 00 10:15 



AMC 



Beverly Connection 



HeyAmoMITheMovM 
Mon-Tue 12:00 2O0 4:30 7O0 ». 



PACIFIC 



Westwood 



CREST 

1262 westvraod Blvd. 

(S ol WIMiaro 
474 7866 or 
777-FlLM (#025) 



Llto and SMch 16) 

THX-OkM 

Moo Wed (2 00 4:30) 7:009!20 

Thu (1 1 30 2:00 4:30) 7O0 9 30 



To advertise 
In the 

Bruin Movie 
Guide 

call 
310.825.2161 



I 



8 m DAILY MUM • MONDAY. JULY 1. 2002 



CLASSIFIED 



Index 



Announcements 



^^ Campus Happenings 
^va Campus Omiakm 

1300 CampusReivunment 
1400 Campus Services 
^m BirlMays 
^900 Legal fMkes 
yfCOLottAFound 
mo MIe c eM a ne cu s 
^mObOuanesCmh 
ino Personal Haauges 
2000 Personals 
20BO Pregnancy 
TmRecreaOonalAcliyma 
22£D Res«an:h Subfects 
ZSao Spem/Egg Donors 
MOO Tldfgts Offered 
2900 TtoMillinM 



Merchandise 



znOApptnes 



3000 Boats 
3100 CMvCM; 

3200 CamensCamconiBrs 

SXD OotedtUBs 

MOD OonwulBrsCSmr. 



3B00 Rankn 
VOD QngaTMSatBt 
vnt^tmr^oducis 




WBD MuBlalfvUimnb 

4000 O/teBfi^ment 

4mpst 

^BBD RBn^Bf^mnl 
4300 ^»r6£gi4ynanr 
4400 aKtrntOMbB 
4BBBlMi9)arfe 



Transportation 



^BBD AubAccBsaoriee 
fOOa Aubhsmnoe 

mnAubRapat 
4B00 >Uvir2M» 
9000 aoife tar S* 

9200 Rateig 
S300 SbDOferC^ctoftiar 
5400 StaotostrS* 
9900 mtbtrRant 



Travel 



C3 



ABMTtl^MMl 

maomiKOibied 
mmpuBsmnu 



5700 tmelJtimt 
5720 licrtan/teia^ 



Services 



1-900 numbers 

mof¥wnMm 

6000 tBtance 

•100 Oomputr^JlBmet 
t190 ^cra^Larvunv 
GOO /MV^avV^yMbv 



•300 ZipirAMa»'>ttn99 
•400 Mat«y5>W|Be 
•900 MUBtLBBBane 



¥>' 



•no /ta#7iK 

•800 Ukuttiti/kMib 
7000 Uitv^MfK/ 
7100 UMtigmmsd 

7200 ^p^ 
7300 MM»v^ 



Employment/Careers 



7400 Aatmss OlpparftrMes 
7900 QnorCtinrtAiK 
7B00 CM/C^OhrK/ 
7700GWC^tMnM 

motmfmnbd 

TWO AJwOiJs mwfc/ Qwy ^ 




1200 Jampaary Empkjj/ment 
OOOUAfMr 



Housing 



MBO Apartments for Rent 

SflO ^pvtwi? to 27h(o r^ 

•600 >^pvtnvi6r 

•100 OanionbmtoutekrRBnt 

000 OnokylSMnfiauvibrS* 

•100 QueeittuaB for Rant 

•BOO HoLeetorRBTt 

flOOO HouBBtrSitB 

two HoitBtxjBte tor R/iiSita 

V£DHouBtvMBedBd 

m RoomkrHB0 

MOO RoomtrRBnt 

•900 Roomm^ BBm ieBBRoom 

9000 RouwalBS-ShBred Roam 

mosMBis 



To place an acLcaH 
31 0.8^.2221 



Motir to FIbc9 tnJkh 
By Phone 

310.825.2221 

ByFax 

310.206.0528 

On the Web 

www.bruinmarkRtplace.codi 

By Email 

dassifieds^niedia. uda.edu 

In Person 

On-Campus (UCLA) 
118 Kerckhoff Hall 

By Mall 

UCLA Daily Bruin Classifieds 
118KefCkhoffHa!! 
308 Westwood Ptaza 
Los Angeles. CA 90024-1641 



OMiiyMiAwiMw 



Mon: dosed 

Tue-Thu: 10am - 2:30pm 

Friday: 10am -2pm 



Classified Line Ads: 

1 tXBiness day before printing 
12 noon. 

Classified Display Ads: 

2 business days before printing 
@ 12 noon. 



One insertion, up to 20 

...each additional vwd 0.75 

I2pt. headline 1. 

I6pt. headline 2.1 

Box $1. 



5 insertions, up to 20 words $33.00 

each additional word 2.45 

1 2pt. headline 7.65 

i6pt.headNne 9.90 

BOL.... .$5.00 



20 insertions, up to 20 word $108.00 

each additional word 6.501 

12pt. headline 29.5ol 

16pt. headline 35.00 

Bo. $20.00 



1. What Is it? 

Use words ttiat best describe 
wtiat you are selling 

2. Just the facts- 

Indude al tt)e facts: condi- 
tion, year, make, and features 

3. Price- 
Always include ttie price... 
many classified readers will 
not respond wtttiout ttie price 

4. Avoid abbreviations- 
Make your ad easy for 
readers to understand 

5. Phone Number- 

and area code wHti best 
times to cal 

6.Conipare- 

CtiecK out ottier ads in your 
section for examples. 



50 insertions, up to 20 word $220.00| 

..each addctional word 11.30{ 

1 2pt. headline 75.75 1 

16pt. headline 92.50 

BOK. $50.00 

For Classified Display ads, 

plaiaa see our rats card for 

vanaoM rats Niioiiiiauoiu 

Please make checks payable to 
The UCLA Daily Bruin" 



We Accept 



r - ^ 




Alk)w 5 working days for mailed 
payments. 

fMn wIfMt to 



Sp eds l Fsstuns 
tklssues 



Your Classifieds 
are a click-click 
away ev«iy day. 




t 




T 



cwy vMonmMf ana rniwy 
310.8252221 




Every dayt 
310.825.2221 



VLflOf DIStI 

WW1M vUlMMdhlLttiin 

FtH/Wlntsr a Spring/Summer 
310.825^61 




Every 5th and lOtti 
310.8252161 



Hnd e\/efytNng you need online at 

WWW.BRUINMARKETPUCE.COM 




Don't get stuck in a lease this summer 
Sublet your apartment! 



Important dotes 



vertise^ 



Coitoct: 

Doiy Bruin Qossified Line 
118 Karckhoff Hall 

310.825.2221 

E-Mdb 

dassifi6(ls@m6dia.ucla.edu 



PiblcotiM Dotes: 

Disployods: 4/24, 5/1, 5/8, 5/15, 
5/22,5/29,6/6,6/10 
Line ods: Any 4 days adjocent to the 
display od date. 
DtoflMs: 
Mondays at 12:00 Noon 




il-LIAfl TOUK WOKKIIt 



1*t ^auClj^ Currrvir^P^^ ^~^ *^ »^ff*»^ *» Unwxrmv o« CaWomw^ potcv on nonHmunwtfb o n No madKjm ttta mxm* ■d^tr t ^wnf O nxhch prwint panon> o( any ongn. 
m», urn. or tMUtf crwiMbon r a Jwi—^iQ *"y <y *" "^ "^ "^ ** ■'"'I*'' poMiona. c a oit m im. rotaa. or ttatua t\ aocMty Narth«r ttw Omtf Brun nor thm ASUCO Comrrunication 
SoMd tmt rw«M(Mlad «iy of tw wrvKm advwtMd or Vw advwttMmwM* m grnMrt u a n »m mtum Any parson b athing twl an adverr w errw i m m« laaue vuMad the Board's pokey on 
i lm ilwiiiwwfciii i ia i a nwir ftm tO rr*nn0w^Mm i« »i«j^rm r orOip lo ti» taiM t a nt Oaacior Da<y Brwi, 1 16 KarcWwW Hal. 308 Wm t mood Ptaza. Loa Angetaa 90024-1641 For aaa*- 
mv» iMti rwuwig dammaan (fot^mm. ctf t«a uCLA Htumng OMoa al (3101 826-4271 or cat tta W>Mtaida Far Houa«>g CMica ai (3101 47S-9671 Ci aaaiHad ada alao i«)paw on-lna 
• M^i/ZWww <krtytvu>i uc^adu P fe^« «f^ n«>-an« ■ a <l»ad aa a c omc « manl a r» aarvca lor cualomara and ■ no« auaran i aa rl Tha Oa^ Br\jn « raaponaAla tor Via Rrat ncsrrad inaer- 
*yi wty Mnor iypo9i«r<K^ wrw« m not tt^bf tor r«k«id». For any raluid. »ia Oariy Brun C la> " *ad OaparVnant mjat ba noMad o4 an arror on Iha ftrat day a< pubkcatnn by noon 




aioo 

Campus Happenings 



SIGN UP NOW! 

WOODEN CENTER NEW BEGINNING TAI 
CHI CHUAN Summer Session. Traditional 
Yang Style. Contact Rudy 310-825-0518 or 
Wooden Center. Also Tai Chi Chuan Club 
Summer Program. Master Karol: 818-996- 
3787. 

SwIn^Salsa-Tango 

SUMMER LESSONS 

MONDAYS 7-1 0p.m. 

@Ackerman Union 2408 

ENDS August 26th 
Field Trips ail Summer 

LEARN SWING-SALSA-TANG0-WALTZ@7 
p.m. Leam-Popular-Une/Folk-Dances9-10pm 
www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ballroomdance 
www.geodties.com/SwingSalsaTango Ball- 
room-Dance-CKIbAlntemational-Folk-Dance- 
Club. 310-284-3636 ballroom@ucia.edu 



1800 

Miscellaneous 



2000 

Personals 



FRIENDSHIP? LOVE? European lin- 
guist/writer, good-looking, gentle, cosmopoli- 
tan, accomplished, mature, healthy lifestyle, 
k)ves literatureAraveling/outdoors, seeks at- 
tractive/affectbnate/natural young female, any 
race/origin, possibly romance/maniage. 310- 
573-0270/maniwotf®mai! com 



2200 

^1^^;, JPesearch Subjects 



EARN $100. SUBJECTS WITH YELLOW 
TEETH needed for a teeth whitening study be- 
ing conducted Culver City (3 visits). 310-845- 
8330. 



2200 

Research Subjects 



HEALTHY ADULTS NEEDED for a research 
study on mucosal immunity at UCLA. The re- 
search study involves medrcal procedures in- 
cluding bkx>d donatk)ns and sigmoidoscopies 
(a flexible tube put into the rectum). Subjects 
wiH be pakJ up to $100 per visit. To find out 
more about the s study caH; Charles Prk» at 
310-206-7288 Peter A. Anton M.D.. Dept of 
Medk;ine, Principal Investigator. 

SMdKERS WANTED!!! 

EARN $10 IN 25 MINUTES. Fun easy memo- 
ry study. Anonymous. On Campus. Call Dani: 
310-801-1406 or email danip@postmark.net 



NOT A CONDOM 



Consider a new vaginal gel designed to protect 
against pregancy and infection. Couples who 
join a major, federally funded study will test a 
diaphragm with either the gel or regular 
spermicide as birth control for 7 months. 



$300 



plus free supplies, movie passes/CDS/video rentals 

Col I 800 521 5211 



1800 

Miscellaneous 




VOLUflTEERS between the age of 18-30 with 
normal visk>n, balarK:e arxl in good health ae 
needed for pakl research on eye nx>vements 
at UCLA. For more informatkx) call @ 310- 
206-6354 

WOMEN AGES 18-40 with arxl without pre- 
menstrual syndrome wanted lor a 3 nxxith re- 
search study which entails mood diaries, bkxxl 
tests, 2 OPTIONAL spinal taps and taking Pro- 
zac for 14 days. Must not be taking any other 
medk»tkxi. $350 for your time. 310-825-2452. 



^2300 

permfEgg Donors 



Pick up a 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 1 8-31 

wishing to help infertile couples. 

$5,000 

at^ CALL MIRNA (818) 832-1494 ^ 



uition 




0^ C^mp^S 




In the student bookstore and look lor the white 
Reeycler street racks at nearby locations. 



with eggs 



If you're a woman between the 
ages of 18 and 32, you can earn 
money easily and anonymously 

by donating your eggs to an 
infertile couple. 

Compensation is $5,000 

For more information, please call 
The Center for Egg Options 

310/546-6786 

•The Center for Egg Options. LLC 



EGG DONOR NEEDED 

By infertile couple-fK)t an agerKy, (wife is 
Bruin alumni). Dark hair artd eyes and un- 
der 27 y/o preferred. $4000 or more. La/^ 
310-914-7600. 




3450 

^^^^^^oftware/Ganies 



XBOX FOR SALE 

Perfect corKlitk)n. Includes: hak), 4 controllers, 
DVD remote. M this for only $250! Please caN 
310-804-1507. ' 



100 

Campus Happenings 



FEMALE MBA GRADUATE Needs Financial 
Sponsorship/Assistar)ce for securities Lkjens- 
ing. Email: yemedessa@hotmail.com 

LOOKING for new or current GRE books 
(2000-2002). practice tests and other GRE 
material. 310-612-0163. 

ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Your on-campus & on-line banking source for 
students, emptoyees & alumni. Free checking, 
student k}ans, car k>£ins. Campus offk:e: Ack- 
erman A-level, www.ucu.org, call 310-477- 
6628 



^2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



Do voii MitlVr irom m'\(mt Pro-inoihtriial SMiiphMih? 



UCLA and Berlex Lalwratohes are corxJucting a 6 montfi research study tor women with 
Symptoms (PMS) You may qualify tor this stiidy if you experience some of the foUowing 
week before your menstrual cycle: 

• Depressed mood • lension • Irritability • Feeling suddeiil> 
Qualifying participants must: 

• Ha\e regular menstrual cycles 

• Be between the ages of 18 and 40 (30 if you're a smoker^ 

• Nut be using medications for the treatment of PMS, 
including antidepressants, herbal treatments or birth c 

All Study related evaluations will be provkledat 



Severe Pre 
symptoms 



menstrual 
during the 




Some women will be given the study medicatkxi, and others will receive a sugar piN (placebo). 

You will be paid for your part)cipatk)n. 

To get more informatioD at>out taking part in this study 

Contact Dr. Andrea Rapkin at UCLA OB/GYN 



(310)S25-2452 



+ 



GUS8IFIE0 



2300 

{pomi/Egg Donors 



23QD 

Spnrni/Ey(j Donors 



2300 

Sporin/Ecjcj Donors 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



MONDAY. JULY 1. 2002 -THE DAILY BRUM 



9 



2300 

Sperm/ Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/ Egg Donors 




EGG DONOR NEEDED 




• ... !■ ■ I 

Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: 



Height Approximately 5'9 or Taller 



Caucasian 



S.A.T. Score Around 1250 or High A.C.T 
College Student or Graduate Under 30 



No Genetic Medical Issues 



Don't c 

for extra 



rents 



Paid to you and / or the charity of your choice 

COMPENSATION $80,000 

I 
All related expenses will be paid in addition to your 

compensation | 



If you're male, in college or 
have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
where you can earn up to 
$600 per month, call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
comprehensive health 
screening . Plus you can 
help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. So If 
you're looking for a great 
job and little extra cash, 
call us first. 




ftejtibte hours 
minimai'time 
commitment 



310-824-9941 

or check out our website at 
httpj/'/www.cryobank- com/donors 



^ff^W^f^^tf 



For more information or to obtain an application please 
contact Michelle at the Law Offices (800) 808-5838 or email 

EggDonorInfo@aol.com 



L 



^ 5900 

Financial Aid 



STUDENT LOANS 

University Credit Union is your Stafford and 
PLUS loan lender (Lender Code 832123). 
Campus office: Ackerman A-level. 310-477- 
6628; www.ucu.org 



6000 

Insurance 




/illSlBtB. 



MauVe in good hands, 
f^ike Azer Insurance Agervcy. Inc. 

(310)312-0202 

1281 NA/«stvv/oocJ Blvd. 
C2 biks. So. of Wllshilro) » 

24 Hours g Doy Sefv^c^ 






CycJeTime insurance Services 



*This ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor bank. 




Motorcycle • Motor Scooter • Moped 

LIABILITY INSURANCE IS THE LAWI 

rr-S LESS THAN YOU THINK! 

No KiddingI Ca« lor a free quote! 

(310) 275-6734 

Exotuing* ad tor minimum $10 00 
daoourilaWt Insurance purchaa« 



Computer/Internet 



FINANCIAL AID. HEIRS LOCATED FAST. 
Probate Loans, Advanced Funding. Judge- 
ments Collected, Video Duplicatwn Transfer. 
Visit: http7/www.NV0.conVaddis 



^ 



^ 






For Couples Undergoing Fertility Treatment 



1 



21-34 years of age 

Non-smokers. No drugs 

Attractive Compensation to 
donor, if accepted into program 

Access to Recipients from Seven 
Selected Fertility Centers 




^^ 



Genesis Egg Donor Services 

For information, 

call Jeanne at ... 800/461-9622 



We arc a 100% Pfijrviciaa Based 
Dooor Oocyte Program 

www.gene8t8ivf.com 
)6<nne gsnsiis^hcilniaH.oofTi 



S^OO 

Scooters for Sale 



61 50 

Foreign Languages 



2001 HONDA ELITE SCOOTER. Perfect for 
commuting. Only 1100 miles, Excellent Condi- 
tk)n. $1500. Call Janette: 310-387-9595. 




FRENCH/PERSIAN 

(FARSI) 
PRIVATE TEACHER 

For beginners ar>d foreigriers. Trilingual, 
Persian (Farsi)/French/English. Mrs. Sor- 



aya 310-979-7040. 



6200 

Health Services 



AMAZING! 
SKIN THERAPY 

Natural peeling. ONE step reduces wrinWes, 
stops acne, promotes younger & healthier skin 
just within 2-3weeks. Results guaranteed. Call 
Iris 310-275-3604. 



^mssoo 

Furniture 



lOO^t 1 i/\LAJv^ ucATHER SOFAALOVE-SEAT 
SET. Bnmi new. StW Wrapped. Need to Se«l 
LM $2995. SaotftoeiSteal!) $995 Can Deliv- 
er. 310-415-9075. Joe. 

■ ■ ■■». - ■ — - ■ ■■ ■ 

COUCH FOR SALE. Cre«n cotored. sofa and 
loveMat. $100 for both pieces. Stephanie 310- 
993*8064. 




5680 

Iravel Oestiiialioiu> 



5680 

Travel Oestinations 



1983 FORD MUS- 
TANG 

Black exterior, black Intertor. automata. 
Power eveiylhing. Good condMon. Price 
negotiable. 323-547-8167. 323-268-9960. 



DRESSER Wood 
Approx 3 5'wx1.5i 
nie 310-993-8064 



i*c45 



corxiMkxi. vamiahed. 
AS'h. $75 obo Stepha- 



FUa ORTHOPEDIC MATTRESS SET Brand 
new. In Box. With Wwrwity Must SeM $100. 
310-350-3814 David. 

FULL SIZE REFRIGERATOR AND FREEZER 
Brand new, $250 or obo 310-452-9801 . 

QUEEN DOUBLE PILLOWTOP MATTRESS 
SET. Brand Name, BrarKJ New in Plasbc 
w/^m^anty. Must Sei. Was $595, Sacrifice 
$150 310-350-3814. David. 

QUEEN ORTHOPEDIC MATTRESS SET. 
New, Still m Plastic with Warranty. Must SeH 
mtd Can Delver $100 310-394-9790 Paul. 



A A A A A WOj 



1987 CHEVY NOVA. Brown, 4-door, automat- 
ic. M:. $895 1983 Toyota Camry. A/C. New 
brake system, rebuM engine. slk*-«hNL $695. 
310-429-9824. 

1992 MAZDA MIATA. Bkie converUsle. A/C, 
84kmiles, car cover, UCLA plates. $3800. 310- 
964-4574 

1996 HONDA CIVIC OX COUPE. Red. 2dr. 
manual, 80k. $6200 obo. email: 
mhashibe9yahoo.com or caN 310-476-7016. 

HONDA ACCORD EX '90: 5apeed, stk:k shift. 
135,000 miles. One owner, axceNent condi- 
tion. CD/FM. 8unroof.leaiher seals. Key less 
car alarm, A/C, power windows. Almost new: 
ckjich, electncal horses, belts, MicheNn tires 
SIX months oW. $3700. 310-202-3370, 310- 
396-4701 

HONDA LOW MILES 

2DOOR HONDA ACCORD EX Black. Only 
57K mtles. Manual. 1992 Good CondWon. 
Onginal owner. $5900. 310-475-7171. 



5300 

Scooter/Cycle Repair 



transportatt 

4600-5500 '' 





DENTISTRY 

TEETH 
WHITENING 

DENTAL EXAM+x-ray+deaning, $60. Reg- 
ular $140. Teeth whitening, $75/afch. 10921 
Wilshire #505. 310-824-0055. www.westla- 
dentist.com. Dr. Moe Shammaie. 



^ 6300 

i/Attorneys 



INfMIGRATION 

Green Cards, Work Permits, Change of 

Status, Citizenship, Visa Extensions, 

Company Start-u(>s, and more... 



B 



Angel 



ViSAaNTTER' 



Reasonable Rates 

310-837-3266 Fax: 310-559-8479 

email: angelctr(3>att.net 

Total Confidentiality Guaranteed. 
Privately Owned and Operated. 

Proud Member of the Better 
Business Bureau 



6400 

Movers/Storage 



BEST MOVERS. Licensed, insured. Lowest 
rates. Fast, courteous-fcarefui. Many students 
moved for $103. Lic.-T-163844. Two 24 foot 
trucks NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO 
LARGE! 1-800-2-GO-BEST Vok»mail/pager: 
800-246-2378. 

JERRYS MOVING&DELIVERY. The careful 
movers. Experienced, reliable, same-day de- 
livery. Packing, boxes available. Also, pick-up 
donations for American Cancer Society. Jer- 
ry @ 3 1 0-39 1 -5657 . 



500 

Music Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES virith dedicated profes- 
sional. At your home or WLA studk). Ist-leaa- 
on free. No drum set necessary. Neil:323-654- 
8226. 

FREE THE BEAUTY OF YOUR VOICE 
THROUGH GOOD VOCAL TECHNIQUE. 10 
years European operate experience. Eastman 
graduate. Gale 310-470-6549. 



6600 

Personal Services 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Coniproiwnwyo DisMrtabon Anittmoc 
ThasM. Papers, and Pemnai SMsmanlt 

PropoMli and Booha 

Intomalionai Studenta Waloorm. Sinn 1965 

Shwon Bcaf , PfL.0. 

www.Bear-Write.com 
(310) 470-6662 



6700 

Professional Services 



EL SEGUNOO company k>oking for part-time, 
flexible hours, expeherKed adffMnistrator. 
Must be familiar with MS2000 server, MSSQL, 
MSExchange, Web/MaH server, MS-XP+Of- 
ftee. Manage broadband iitacnatAitranet net- 
work for 20+ users. K/iowledge of hardware 
troubleshootir)g experierKe a must E-mail re- 
sume and referer>ces: Jor- 
danlw(9adeiph(a.net. 

FORMER ENGLISH TEACHER: W/ Masters 
from U-Chicago, edits/word processes disser- 
tations, proposals, sfreenplays, personal 
statements, resumes. Intematk)nal students 
wekx^me. Winstow's:31 0-475-9585. 

MEDICAL/DENTAL 

SCHOOL PERSONAL 

STATEMENTS 

AND ESSAYS. Consulting, Writing, Editing. 
Creative expertise. Also resun)es, cover let- 
ters, dissertatk}n fomnatting. Credit Cards. Ace 
Words, Etc. 310-820-8830 



NIGHT OWL 

Research, Editing. Writing. OPEN 24-7. 
Finest quality at reasonable rates. Intema- 
tkxial students wekx)me. Call Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 



PROFESSIONAL 

EDITING 

SERVICES 

CritKal reading and editing of manuscripts, 
dissertatkxis. Multiple prkang according to tfw 
job. Contact for informatkxi or txochure: my- 
writer@att.net or call 818-243-9903. 
www.4mywriter.com 



7000 

Tutoring Offered 



AAA TUTOR'S CLUB 

HOME TUTORING for students Pre/K-12. Al 
Academk: Subjects, including Foreign Lar>- 
guages and Computer Training. Call:31 0-234- 
0101 orwww.TheTutorsClub.com 

FOREIGN ACCENT REDUCTION. Communi- 
cate with cieirlty&accursK:^. Especially recom- 
mended for foreign T.A's&graduates enteririg 
business worid. Taught by experienced profes- 
sors. 310-226-2996. www.accurateen- 
glish.com. 

MELANIE'S MASTERS: 

AFFORDABLE 

TUTORING 

All ages-subjects English, Math. Foreign Lan- 
guage, Computer, StarxJardized tests, sports, 
Arts&Crafts, piarK>/vk>lin/guitar, singing! 
Babysitting. 310-442-9565. 

MY-TUTOR.COM Math/Physics/Statis- 

tics/English/Hebrew,chemistry/biology, 
Econ/Accounting, &French, Computer pro- 
gramming. Computerized statistical analysis 
available. Tutonng servKe. Call anytinie. 800- 
90-TUTOR. 

PREMIERE TUTORING 

Premium private tutoring for the LSAT, GMAT, 
& GRE. Intense preparation, reasonable rates. 
Call 323-660-4132 or www.premieretutor.com 

PROFESSIONAL WRITER/TEACHER will 
tutor English, writing, conversations. 
University and High School levels. 
International students wek:ome. 310-475- 
9585. 

SPANISH TUTOR: Native speaker. Conversa- 
tkxial. Grade levels and aU ages. Flexible 
hours. Call Noelle 310-273-3593 



Classifieds 
825-2221 






Display 
206-3060 



K) 



THl DULY BmiN • MONDAY, JULY 1, 2002 



GUS8IFIED 



j^mmw^m^m^mwM' 



Quality Health Care 
summer - 

mostiy raiE with SHIP or PUSH 



A!i UCIA student:, 't'ciistccd tn Spring 20i 
e!»giblo fo use the Arthur Ashe Student Health & 
Wellness Center m S"'r>imef 2002 ov a fee fen 
5>erv.ce basis But it ^ m^.'lv FREE if you had SHIP 
for Sprin.j or hn\e purchaj^'d PUSH. 
Visit our Web stt^ k"^r more ififor motion or request 
an appointment or o4 ci health related question 

'>yww.sfudefiHiealth.u€lo 
or coll 825-4073 

ucia Ashe Center 

Accred.ted by AAAHC ,' 2002 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Lhasa — 

5 Put in the fridge 

9 Impress 
12 TV s Griffin 
13 in the dark 

15 Red Sea vessel 

16 Monsieur s pate 

17 West Indies dance 

18 Ramble around 

19 Gleam 
21 Atomiser 

23 Truth bender 

24 Beer barrel 

25 Light lunches 
28 hieavy rains 

33 Hoofbeats 

34 Pact letters 

35 Campus sports 
org 

36 LL O holder 

37 On tt>e up and up 

38 Long-rurwing play 

39 Tangles 

41 Tentades 

42 Writer — Bmchy 
44 One-ceNed ant- 
mats 

46 Did road work 

47 Box-score stat 
46 Tapered seam 
49 Restless 

53 Surround 

57 Sulk 

58 Cut of beef 

60 Singer — Adams 

61 Mihf brews 

62 Pithy 

63 Put on the block 

64 Stale 

65 rsiot e en once 

66 Mach 1 breakers 

DOWN 

1 Tsp and oz 

2 Steal a alar)ce 

3 Tijuana Ms 

4 More than touch 



PREVICXJS PUZZLE SOLVED 



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7-1-02 (C 2002 unii«d FealufB Syn(»cate Inc 



5 Diva Maria — 

6 WiHow shoot 

7 Electrk:al 
measure 

8 Tosses 

9 ^4auticaJ 
areeting 

10 Made cloth 

1 1 Big pitcher 

14 Bun 

15 Rre-breatt>er of 
myth 

20 Baby goats 
22 Thing, in law 

25 Rascal 

26 Bride s 

' destination 

27 State-run game 

28 Vok^ncflow 

29 Redding of 
blues 

30 Yeltow pigment 

31 Unwary 

32 Jaded 

34 Successor to 



Claudius 
37 Idlest 
40 Sashays 

42 Antony the 
Roman 

43 Ingenuous 

45 Kirrwno sash 

46 Fuel carrier 

48 Norte tou bright 
46 Game tor (2 
wds.) 

50 Playwright — 
Coward 

51 Campus square 

52 Not now 

54 Byron's works 

55 River deposit 

56 Congers 
59 "We - not 

amused" 




7000 

ring Offered 



UCLA PROF TUTOR 

MATH TUTOW. Al Levels of Math UCNcago 
Ph.O, At«i«liMit Professor at UCLA. Winner of 
tsaching a«vard CaH Paul: 310-387-7796. 

I WRITING TUTOR 

Kind and pabent Stanford graduate Help with 
the English language -for students of ail 
agea^evete 3io-440-3i18 



7300 

Writing Help 




NEED WRITING HELP? 

WE HELP YOU WRITE WHAT YOU WANT 
TO $AYI EXPERT EDITING' Theses. D«- 
sertatKXis, Essays, Personal Statements. 
MarHiScnpts. International students wel- 
come. 818-345-1531 



AOO 

Business Opportunities 



MY TEAM MAKES 
MONEY! 

Flexit)le. no products . no large investment 
You must be senous and motivated Call Bill 
323-465-2313 (11anv7pm-Mon-Sat) 



NIGHT OWL 

Research. Editing. Wntmg OPEN 24-7. 
Finest quaMy at reasonable rales. Intema- 
tionfii students wekXKne. Cai Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 



7SOO 

Career Opportunities 



AD DIRECTOR 

NEEDED for a weekly newspaper Must be re- 
sponsible arxj on time. Well organized, detail 
orienled, su months con^mitment . student ok 
Mutt have own transportation. CaU 310-6S8- 
6761. 



jsr a.i'^ T' Ai eg! 



r 



TEACHER/PROVIDER 
POSITIONS ' 

"pedal Ed/RSP Teacher 

FT/PT $45/hr+ DOE 

$ 1 000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Speech/Lano. Therapist 

FT/PT $) 1 0/hr 

$3000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Secondary Single-Subject 

Credentialed Teachers 

Subjects: Math or Science 

or Lang. Arts 

$45/hr DOE FT/PT 



Positions are located in/around 
the So. California Region 
Please fax your resume to 

909-335-7195 

Attn: Jennifer Langford 

www.gormanlc.com 



^ 



COMMERCIAL LONG 
DISTANCE SALES 

Vo<ce/data/T-1. Aggressive, established com- 
pany pays lifetime residuals on ALL accounts. 
Nationwide. Elephant hunters! MUST have tel- 
ecom experier>ce. MCI crew welcornel Fax 
801-383-5919. 

FT LAB TECHS WANTED for Biotech compa- 
ny in WLA. Testing human plasmas. Fax re- 
sume to 310-996-1398 or email 
celling <9 ngi.com. 



m06OO 

Child Care Offered 



AFFORDABLE 
CHILD CARE 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL run by 
UCLA grads. Ages 2.5/6years Two large piay- 
yards. Open year-round 7:30-5:30. Close to 
UCLA. 310-473-0772. 

CHILD CARE OFFERED with excellent refer- 
ences and lots of love. Flexible. 310-657- 
4588. Call Judy. 

Child care offered-Just graduated from Ha- 
vard-Westlake looicing for a summer job ar>d 
love working with kids. If interested 
call:31 0422-7996 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



BABYSITTER NEEDED tor 9month oW. 8:30- 
1 :30 3days/week. OcasstonaJ Saturday everv 
ings. Expenence necessary and excellent ref- 
\ required. Start August. 310-230-7475. 



GOVERNESS/TUTOR 

LOOKING for reliable, smart, mature lady to 
work as a govemessAutor. Great environment. 
Great benefits. Must be able to travel aH over 
the world. Pay negotiat>le. 310-842- 



Looking for motf)er's helper for Jf^ sweet 
2.5yr oU. Flexible hours. $9/hr. 310-839-3939. 



?-6^ 



P/r HELP NEEDED 

NEED PERMANENT PH" HELP for 2 kkJs 
arxl dog in excfutf)ge for kjxurious high- 
rise condo. AutonK)bile, utilities, arxj food. 
Located in Wilshire Corridor- beautiful 
views, covered parking, swimming pool. Po- 
sitnn availat>le July 15th. For further details 
can RKhard Rand 310-466-4251. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our cir- 
culars. For info call 203-977-1720. 

$300/DAY POTENTIAL 
BARTENDING 

Will tram. Call:866-291 -1884x440. 

ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION Scheduling. 
typing, filing, phones and fee coHectior^. Morv 
Thurs 4pm-8pm, and Fri 8:30am-2:30pm. 
hours not negotiable. Pay Is DOE. Daniel Sa- 
lazar 310-479-8353. 

ANNOUNCERS, no experience necessary. 
Host musicAak-shows for our radio stations. 
PfT. $10-15/hr. $200+per/show, plus fantastk? 
benefits. 323-468-0060, 24-hours. 

APARTMENT MANAGER 

To manage 16 units in Westwood. Expenence 
required. 1 -t>edroom4«alary. Fax resume 310- 
889-0013 

ASAP MOVIE EXTRA WORK: AH types need- 
ed. Work on mus»c-vkleos. motion-p)ictures. 
TV commercials. PT/FT. Make up to $500/day 
Call 24hr5. 323-960-5216. 

ASSISTANT NEEDED 

Hourly -f bonuses. 20hrs/week-t-. Flexible 
hours, will train. Good attitude a must. 310- 
234-1190. 

BARTENDERS NEEDED: Earn up to $250 
per/night. No experience necessary. 866-291- 
1884 ext 435 

BARTENDING 

$250 A DAY POTENTIAL. Training provided. 
1-800-293-3985 ext510. 

CASHIER, experier)ce required, for music 
retail store Medical plus 401 K. Fax 310-477- 
2476. 



CASHIERS 
$10-$14/HOUR 

LOOKING FOR HIGH ENERGY CASH- 
IERS for kx^ quick service restaurant. Call 
818-755-7789 ask for Patty. 



CLERK/SECRETARY. PT 10-20hrsAvk. West- 
wood law firm. Filing, typing, learn white you 
work. tlexit)le schedule. 1-yr commitment re- 
quired. Fax resume 310-446-9962. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



CLERK: TIRED OF SCHOOL? BH Law Finn 
needs dependable clerks. Experience the le- 
gal worid 30hr/wk. $7.50/hr. Fax Resume to: 
310-274-2798. 

COORDINATOR, POSPFIVE APPEARANCE 
CENTER. Direct daily running of tt>e Positive 
Appearance Center (PAC) including consult- 
ing with patients, fitting of mastectomy pros- 
theses/bras, support garments, and wigs; 
sales of all items carried in PAC, maintaining 
inventory. Insurance billings, and supervision 
of personnel inci volunteers Consult with pa- 
tients to determine specific needs and plan 
timetables to meet those needs Explanation 
and sales of all items carried. Transaction pro- 
cessing on Ouk^k Books Software. Annual in- 
ventory of all stock. Daily maintenance of 
stock; assess inventory and place orders to 
maintain stock levels. Able to merchandise 
prods attractively as well as maintenance of 
PAC in a neat and orderty manner or ensuring 
tfwt hospital maintenance fjorforms these 
tasks. Must have at least 2 years of a conjbi- 
nation of technical training in an area pertinent 
to the PAC such as dept. store retail sales and 
cosmetotogy or beautician and business skills 
(e.g. sales, A/P. medical billing processing). 
Qualified candidates shoukj submit resumes 
to :hr@ jwci.org and use code PAC-DB. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



7800 

Help Wanted 



LIBRARY ASSISTANT SWIM COACH NEEDED 



FT Entry Level opportunity with industry lead- 
er. Dedicated, detail-oriented, dependable 
person to access UCLA campus libraries. Stay 
in shape while you wort<. Excellent pay Email 
resume to tdi@tdico.com or fax 310268-0701 . 



Are you a model. 



■liiifiyi 



Looking for all types 
male/female models/actors 
We also have Plus size & Children div 

Kor prim & non-union commercials 
No expenence required. No fees. 



MARKETING ASST 

WLA Design Studio seeks marketing-oriented 
indivkjual for pronx>tional campaign. PfT, flexi- 
ble, off-site. Computer required. Email 
resume: info@fahrenheit.com 

MEDICAL OFFICE looking for Front Office po- 
sition. Good secretarial skills, friendly, motivat- 
ed, hard-working, and dependable. Ca\\ 310- 
828-6388. fax resume 310-828-7122. 






^ H 






i 



Research Technician 

Th« Howard Hughes Medical Institute is seeking a 
Research Technician for our affiliated site at UCLA 

Principal Responsibilitii 

* Perform basic molecular biology 
procedures and in-situ hybridization; 

* Maintain moose colony; 

* General laboratory management 

PrefffTed Quolifications 

* BA/BS in Molecular Biology or related field; 

* Previous experience in a laboratory 

To App l y 

Please send resume and names of 
three references to: 

Doug Geissert 
l^tx>ratory Manager 
' Howard Hughes Medical instituteAJCI-A 
675 Charles E. Young Drive South, 5-748 MRL 
Box 951662 

Los Angeles, CA 90095-1662 
enuiil: gelssertOhhml.ucla.edu 

EOE Application Deadline: Open Until Riled 



I 



CUSTOMER SERVICE/SALES ASSOCIATE 
Great-student-job. P/T-Flexible hours. Hourty 
plus bonus. Computer skills/bilingual en espa- 
nol a plus. Westwood Village Insurance Agen- 
cy across from Rite-Akj UCLA students who 
have finished Freshman/Sophmore year only! 
Call Pat:31 0-208-71 83 



2iIIiiiEIiiE 




• Eani$l00-$200aday ^ 

• 2 w»eh training & Job ' ^Jr 

Placement included r 

• rs not • Job -ir« a PARTY!!! I 

National Bartenders School^lh. 



1 (800) 646 • MIXX (&499) 



EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

ASSISTANT for executive of real estate in- 
vestment firm. Required: computer skills, 
sales skills, highly organized, rrtotivated, out- 
going, vehtele. $10/hr. 25hrs/wk to start. Eric 
310-479-4945 x133. 

F/T AAI. Data Collectk>n/Entry/Analysis. Assist 
in the collection of referer>ces. Compare data 
file analysis arxj study cfiarts w/datat>ase 
tries for accuracy. Fax resume 310-794-28 

FILE CLERK 

$8Air. F/T and P/T, flexible hrs. Near West LA. 
Fax resume 323-938-5827. 

FILE CLERK NEEDED 

West LA law firm seeks P/T file derk. Deperxl- 
able, detail-oriented. $11 /hr. 20-30hrs/wk. 
Permanent P/T. Fax resume 310-838-7700. 

FREE PICTURES or French lessons (I give) in 
exchange for non-sexual massage. Profes- 
sk>nal photographer. Also makj once/week. 
310-478-4734. 

FT SRA I. Exp. in biomedical research, work 
w/small rodents. Conducting behavioral and 
physiotogk^ai experiments to access anxiety 
and cokjrectal sensitivity. Assist in surgeries, 
tissue and bkxxj coUectKxis, and processing of 
samples tor histology, immurwhistochemistry, 
ELISA £irxJ RNA isolation. Administer drugs us- 
ing several different routes including oral ga- 
vage arxl i.p. arxJ s.c. injection. Fax resume 
310-794-2864. 

GENERAL OFFICE ASSISTANT needed. 
Computer literate. 30-35hrs/week. Ability to 
multi-task, organize. Fax resume: 310^59- 
0547. Attn: Mike. 

GENERAL OFFICE WORK in Beverly Hills 
law offtoe. Mon-Fri 1-5:30. $8/hr. Call 310-273- 
3151. 

GRAPHIC DESIGNER 

BLUE DRAGON Advertising, a full-servk:e ad- 
vertising agency in L.A, CA seeks a F/T 
Graphk: Designer to devise both innovative art 
& appropnate copy layouts tor n>atenals to be 
presented via print ads, broadcast, and Inter- 
net. Proficient in Quark Xpress (English/Ko- 
rean), Adobe Photoshop & Illustrator, specular 
Infini-D, & Coral Draw. Min 2 yrs of experierx^e 
& B.A in Fine Arts or equiv. Please email re- 
sume arxJ coverletter to: bluedragon_ad@ya- 
hoo.com. 

GROUP TUTORS WANTED for summer aca- 
demic day camp. 10-6PM starting June 17, 
ending August 30. M-F. Salary $130O4Hjp. 
Contact Chrissy:323-937-7737. 

HELP WANTED-POSS. ROOMMATE. PART 
TIME PERMANENT REAL ESTATE ASSIS- 
TANT/Ught house work. References, Need 
Concienctous Person. 310-820-6059. 

INT'L MARKETING 4 PR firm for luxury goods 
in Beveriy Hills, CA, seeks bilingual (Eng- 
lish/Italian) put>lk: relation Specialist. Excellent 
written & spoken Italian Responsibilities will 
include: contact with trade arxJ consumer pub- 
licattons; assuring editorial coverage; daily 
contact with Italian clients for media opportuni- 
ties; media advertising planning and budgeting 
for Italian clients, daily contacts with US retail- 
ers regarding co-op advertising opportunities 
for Italian clients; maintaining clients advertis- 
ing database; B.A in communication and 
Smonths mm. of expenence. Please send re- 
sume/qualifications to Aiex/Jeri, Fax: 323-653- 
1768 or e-mail: humanresources@ijginv.com 



MEDICAL OFFICE LOOKS FOR COMPUTER 
PROGRAMMER/MARKETING PERSON. 
Dependable, Mature, Good persorudity. Inter- 
national students wekx>me. 310-828-6388. 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

WEST WILSHIRE MEDICAL GROUP is a 
busy neurotogy medk^al office have ti>e foltow- 
ing Full-Tlme positions open for immediate 
consideration. Front Desk, Physkal Therapy 
Assistant, Physician's Assistant, tiBnscription- 
ist. Ultrasound technk^ian, X-ray technician 
and medk^ biNer. Requirements, experience 
necessary, muli-task person required, de- 
pendaisie, punctuai, computer literate, and 
team player. Fax resume:310-479-4220, or 
entail: asaico@earthlink.net "^ 

MODELS WANTED by professtonal photo stu- 
dto tor upcoming assignments. Male/female, 
pro/non-pro. Call for an appt 818-986-7933. 

NATIONAL MODEL SEARCH discovering new 
faces and talent! Free auditions! For upcomir>g 
TV shO¥Vs! Call 310-360-1240 or 310-360- 
6992. 

OFFICER MANAGER. Will ti^ain to manage of- 
fice. Computer knowledge. M-F 30-40hrs/wk. 
Salary+Benefrts. 310-476-4205. 

PART-TIME PERSONAL ASSISTAf^ to mn 
errarKte arxl do bask: schduKng and househokj 
tasks. Work 3 AM's per week approx. 15hrs. 
Need to have own car and like dogs. $11- 
12/hr. Start ASAP ar>d continue through sctKX)l 
year. Fax Resume: 310-472-5158. 

PART-TIME TYPIST West LA Law Firm. 20- 
30hrs/wk. Transcribing tapes. 

65+words/minute. Permanent P/T. Fax re- 
sume 310-838-7700 

PHYSICAL THERAPY AID. FULL-TIME, occa- 
storud Saturdays. Fast paced, out patient of- 
fice in Culver City. WeU ti-ained, massage skills 
a plus. Fax resume: 310-837-9701. 

PRIVATE ASSAYER Magazine of Individual 
Urinary Studies wants writers. Must be over 
21. Call Mr. Vandegrift: 310-207-4671. 

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Westwood Vil- 
lage production company hiring student PA. 
Camera, Editing, Submissions, Errands. 
Clean driving record a must. UCLA StixJents 
wfK) have completed FreshmarVSophmore 
year only. Call Patrick:31 0-208-71 83. 

PROMOTIONS REPRESENTATIVE: Film ad- 
vertising. Call retail stores tor upcoming re- 
leases. Coordinate store visits. Bilingual pre- 
ferred. P/T-F/T-8am-12pm or 12:30pm- 
4:30pm-flex.$9/hr+tx5nus. 310-289-2194. 

PT RECEPTIONIST POSITION. Afternoons. 
Century City Law Office. $10/hr. Fax resume 
310-282-8117. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT1 . Assist in pert vari- 
ous immunotogy assays by preparing buffers 
arxJ solutions, day to day conduct of required 
tasks (i.e record and data keeping, house- 
keeping, and routine data collection). /Assist 
research staff in the isolatton of tumor antigens 
from biotogical samples (tunrior cell lines, 
tumcr tissuew, 24 hour urines) to be used as 
reagents. Required: BS degree in btotogical 
science, chemistry, or immunotogy, lyr of 
exp., knowledge of windows 95. MS Word, Ex- 
cel, Access, PowerPoint. Submit resumes to: 
hr@jwci.org and reference code RG-DB/RA1 

RETAIL CASHIER PT for bike shop. Apply I 
Martin Inc. 8330 Beverly Blvd. (4-bk>cks east 
Beverly Center) 

RETAIL SALES 

PT/FT. Sepulveda Blvd. Designer wed- 
ding/evening gowns. Experience preferred, 
motivated arxl friendly. Great opportunity. Sal- 
ary/commisstons/bonuses. Excellent $$. 310- 
474-7808 Pauline. 

REVISED EMAIL 

HELP WANTED: Busy professtonal is seeking 
an assistant to run errands ar>d administer 
househokj duties (organize bills, meet repair 
people, etc). House is kx^ated off iarchmont 
Village in Har>cock park. Need five to ten 
hours per week (on occasion up to fifteen). 
Flexible hours (perfect for a student or part 
time worker) and competitive pay. Must have 
car. Please include name, contact information 
and any other relevant (experience etc) to 
ckramerOI @attbi.com. 



From Aug26-Nov for private middle school. 
Must have previous experience. CPR certified. 
Interviews June-Aug 20th. Rachael:32a-461- 
3651. 

TELEMARKETER for Fixed Wireless ISP 
Generate leads, dose sales, inform customers 
atx>ut products. Full-time. 12-8pm. Hourty $6- 
1$2. Telecom knowledge preferred. Email 
amy@speedb£ind.com. 

TELEMARKETING 
$10/HR 

EXPERIENCE energetic and motivated peo-. 
pie wanted for appointment settings and sales. 
PakJ weekly. Great West Hollywood tocatksn. 
Call Rita. 310-273-9631. 

URINARY FRACTIONS Magazine wants writ- 
ers. Must be over 21 . Call Mr. Vendegrift: 310- 
207-4671 . 

WANTED: 29 people to tose weight. Earn $$$ 
for the pounds airxj inches you lose. Safe. 
Doctor recommended. 800-296-0477 www.to- 
selikemagic.com 

WRITERS ASSISTANT WANTED in Santa 
Monica. 3-fhrs./wk. Light office work and fami- 
ly en^ands. $10/hr Resume to Mk^hael at: 
graubart@earthlink.net 



^ 8000 

^ Tnternships 



MUSIC AGENCY INTERNSHIP Database en- 
try and Management. General Office Duties. 
Looking for someone w/ strong work ethic, self 
motivation, good sense of style ar>d hurrxx. 
Please email resume: robertb@ bullymu- 
sic.com or fax to 310-481-3968. 

WANT TO WRITE A MOVIE? Succesful 
screenwriter/producer seeks intern to work on 
script for TV. If you're interested in political sci- 
ence/screenwriting/international law, this 
might be right for you. Must be computer-pro- 
fk:ient and self-motivating. 20hrs/wk, flexit)le. 
UCLA-area. Internship course-credit available. 
Call 310-273-0061 or 917-324-2700. 



81 OO 

Personal Assistance 



DISABLED WOMAN NEEDS HELP unpack- 
ing, moving boxes/furniture, cleaning, and 
possible handyworit. $9-$10/hr. Call 310-470- 
6357. 



8200 

Temporary Employment 



TEMPORARY STAFF NEEDED for retail 
ctothing at Mercedes Benz Cup Tennis Tour- 
nament at UCLA Tennis Center July 22-28. 
Call Jack 760-360-4086. 



8300 

Volunteer 



VOLUNTEERING 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES available at 
youth hostel in Santa Monk^a. Meet interna- 
tional travelers. Gain job skills. Lucy 310-393- 
9913x18. 



8/kOO 

Apartments for Rent 



1-MINUTETOUCLA 

Stud to, furnished, dean, security entrance, 
separate kitchen, lacmdry room, pool, lyr 
lease. $850/mo. 310-824-1830. 

1380 VETERAN-1bdnn/1bth. $1395(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/]acuz2i. intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all e^jpliances. Move-in 
ASAP Pets consklered. 310-477-5108. 



MA8M 

Get One-on-One Assistance 

Based on: Area, Amenity, 

* of Bedrooms, Price, Pet 

* 9,000.+ ;- 
^ Vacancies « 

Apartments, Condos, Duplexes, 

Houses, 3,0004- Photos & Virtual 

Wallc-Throughs 

90 Dav W«l» AccMs! 



• FREE Mr,; 



->.. -qU. 



'-^ ">?" I'^ii '(^tT\ If^ 



• FREE initr,,-! E .^V! ' N •* :-, . • 

N.^v. L.,t r.r; •;• 

FREEC'-i'.)- .' A.: :,. 

•HIEEM,^..-:)P:':- — 

ww w,ap o»^«»g" rtHmtier».< om 

310-276-HOME 201 N. Robertson 
(4663) Blvd., Beverly HUls 

^^^^^^^tMttdlords List For Ft 



1380 VETERAN-2bdnn/2bth. $1795(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi, intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all appliances. Move-In 
ASAP Pets consklered. 310-477-5108. 



2BDRM APT for rent for summer. Studto to 
rent for next year. Walking distarx:e to 
UCLA. 310^75-0807. 



BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1 ,2&3BEDROOM, 
$925&UP LARGE. UNUSUAL CHARM. 
SOME SPANISH STYLE W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS. ONLY HALF BLOCK TO PK)0 
BUS. 310-839-6294. 

BEVERLY HILLS APT 

TWO BEDROOM/1 BATH to share. Large, 
sunny, three windows, huge ctoset space. 
Grad student preferred $900-»-utillties. 310- 
271-6072 

BRENTWOOD 2bdmV2bth for rent. 
$1450/month. 310-207-1372. 



WESTWOOD 
PLAZA . 



Studios $1100-1200 

1 bedroom.S 1350- 1600 

Summer discount available. 
Call for details 

Parking Av^able. 
Walkiim dist«ic« to campus. 

310-208-8505 



BRENTWOOD ADJACENT $1290. Cozy 
2bedroom/1bath. 2-car tandem parking. Ctose 
to Wilshire/UCLA freeway. Lease to 2. No 
Pets. 1333 Barry. 310-826-8461. 



-a 



^mm\ 



.^iiS^S.. 



Display 
206-3060 



ClASSIHED 



MONDAY. JULY 1, 2002 • THE DULY MUM 



H 



8400 

Apnrtnients for Rent 



8400 

Apnrtinnnts for Rout 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 




(310) 208-0064. 208-4868 




(310)824-7409 




(310)824-0463 



527A540MkhtieAm 



FtmT-I Intomet access 
ShJdy Lounge \Mlh ccmputers 
Fuly-equlped Illness center 
Pool, sauna, spa & recreation area 
HeaV AC, retigafBior, microwave, 
skvB, cfshMffifiher 
Balcony or pabo & Hrepiaoe 
SUdb,1&2 Bedrooms 



430KBlkmA¥B, 

•DSL Ready 

• Rooftop spa & recreation area 
•Haat/AC. reAigeralor. mawoNe, 

SBM8, OBn^MBsner 

• Bakxny or pabo & fireplace 
•1 &2Bedrooms 



KOOJhfmtmAya, 

*DSLre«Jy 

• Ful/-equiped %ie8S oanlBr 

• Rooflop sundeck & PBcreation area 

• Sauna, outdoor spa & bartwcue 
•Heet/AC. nslhgeralor. 

slave, dtel^Moahar ^ 

• Balcony bay \Mndow, firepiaoe 
•StJdk}Apts.Oniy 




Call today! 



Jilst niinnfes from 



wMestauranIs Theatres Shops 



BRE^f^VVOOp ADJCNT. $1195-$1775. 1- 
bdrTna/2-bdrms/2-baths. ^4«wty Decorated , 
Qui«t tMiMdtng. Bu4lt-ir\/BookcaM/C«m*r. 
UgKt. wMew. X-L«rg«. PatioaAParWng. 
UCLA/IO-mm. No P«ls. Facutaly/Stafl/QrKte. 
1-yr.l«M0 31(M53-5000 310-238-2222. 



Lor-AN^nt5 



210 ^2IA SI 395.00 

6AID GAKA6E MTBCOM BfTlYM IMT 

2IMSAWTHi£ HVD 

(310)391 1074 



BREWTWOCX) ONE BEDROOM LOV^R and 
Qafdaa aatting. Huga palio, naw kMchan, al 
nraplaoa, hardwood Noore. Ona 
No Rata. 11644 Montana Ava. 
knUtXti Juna. $1500. Cal: 31 (Ml 0-1 575. 




BPENTWOOO. Mlnmaa from UCLA, luxurious 
higTwwa w/datuaa appo l Kin ai O and braath- 
taking vtawa. Otyrnptc alza pool and new IN- 
naaa oanlar. Apartmanla from $i20(Vmonth. 
Barrtnglon Ptaza 310-47&-3000. 

BRENTWOOD: $1550. 2bdrTn/2Mh. tMloony. 
rafrigarator/atova. carpat/drapas, parking, 
laundry, no pala, naar LiCLA. by appoMitmant 
11728 MayMd. Ca«:31 0-994-41 22. 310-271- 
6811. 



• PALfVIS * 



aao. 2aA towmmome. fp. ccntral. aw 

HIAT. OATEO Q*t^Milt, SEC. ALARM. CAT OK 

3614 FAfW Oft $129a/MO 

ON-arr^MQR. (310)637-000e 

480. SBA ♦ LOrr TOWNHOMe. FP, COTTRM. 

AM/HEAT. OATEO OMUQE. SEC ALARM. 

CAT OK 



MTOMWALE 



BLVD. 
AVE. 



t2386/MO 



• fVIAR VISTA • 



sac. 38A TOWMHOME. FP. CENTRAL, ANV 
H8AT. GATED QARAOE. SEC. ALARM. CAT OK 



12741 MrrCHEU. AVE. 



tiaaftiao 



ZBDi^BA TO^*«DMES 
11131 AVON «MY. $124fi/MO. 



1l748C0URTl£iGH0R 
12741 MTTCHBl AVE. 
1Z736CASM«1 AVE. 



$1245/MO. 
$1246/MO. 
$124&1MO. 



Opan Houaa Mon-8at 10-4 PM 
(3101301-1076 



oofn 



BRENTWOOD: 4Mnm4lan. 3 ful t>a«w. Rre- 
plaoa, hardwood floors. fuHy-aquippad kilchan. 
Ua^ fcK sharing. Avaiatois July, lyr laaaa. No 
pats $3400. 310-410-1575 



CASA OPHIR 

1B0HM/1BTH starling $1250 2t)drm/2bth 
$2100. Luxury aparlmanta. flva minuta 
wM( to UCLA. Frtdga, diahwaahar. 
m i ci otw a ya. laundry room, parking. bakx)ny. 
NO PETS. 11088 Ophir. Erte.31 0-206- 
1. 



ESCAPE TO THE SEA 



MarinaKlat-Ray. Smal kimlahad laH w a t Cool 
ooMt\ braazaa. O aia^aa caH jl. Marina Rast- 
rooma 150«. away. Talaphona capability. 
$450Mto. 310-368-6316 

GUESTHOUSE 

In baatitiful Westwood homa. Studw w/TuN 
batfi. kilchan. living room. Upstairs badroom 
lofl. Un»um»had. $l150*nth inckiding al utii- 
ittaa and pramium cab^. A\ml»akM 06A»/O2. 
Summar or lyaar laaaa ok. Ca«:310-474- 
2708. 



LUXURY APTS. 1A2badroorTW. Nawty rano- 
vated. Wastwood. Hardwood floors, crown 
mokjinga, tots of light. Wi« conskJw pat 
AC/naw iwUancas. $1490-2640. 310-475- 
9311. 



MAR VISTA, 3t)drm/3t«h townhoma style 
i^Mrtmant. slova. diahwaahar. AX:, haaling. 
Brink Alarm, laundry-facility, two parking 
spacaa. $1895/month. Appointment-onty. Ika- 
na 310i313-0727 



Cl<'issifif>ds 
825-2221 



MARINA MOVE-IN 
SPECIAL 

Spackxjs rww studtoa- 1X3bdrms. T-l iiitar- 
nat. frkJga, mterow a va. A/C. 

pool/spa/gym/sauna, bualnaaa oanlar. oorv 
darga. Chateau M«ina/F1ji VMaa. 310-827- 
3992. 



w 



tL 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Large, Clean 
Singles d 1 Bedrooms 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



PALMS $1250 

Upper. quM, 2-f2. bakxxiy. A/C. flraplaoa. sky- 
Ight al amanMa a . 2-car galad parking, laun- 
dry, bus cormactton UCLA. Opan House July 
3rd. 10718 Lawlar St. 1-apm. 310-390-5996. 



^ WE/TWOOD VIULAOE ^ 
691 LEVERIf^ AVENUE 

V«rv lorg* oportmcncs fxx irrvrwdlota 

occupancy ControHcd ocean, courtyard 

building uuNti pool, alcwator. mbtarronaon 

poitang. amk-in Mtctwrs. lorgs pc«loa or 

boloortiCB. Soma opportmsnts uiMti o fWvptoes 

1 BR/I tMth $1 .300 

2BI^1 t>ath $1 .800 

2BR/2batti $2,300 

For pre-applkattons visit us at 

www.lev«iingh«ights.cofn 

orcaU 
\^ (310) 208-3647 / 



PALMS. 26DRM/1BTH. $1100/month. 9326 
NaCton^ Blvd. LA 90034. Naar bus&fraaway. 
4-plax ttuMbig. Quiat/surviy. laundry room. 
Cal Andy 310-398-7960. 

PALMS. Singia ^ from $600, l-bdm $700. 
$600/$700dapoait l-yair laaaa. Stove. r»- 
frig.carpata. vart binda. 310^7-1502 LM. 
8am-5pm. 



^ 



%, 



Westwood Village 

433 Kelton Ave. 
(310) 208-8685 

1 Bedroom from $1235 

Extra large luxury units irwlude: 

• Fully equipped Icitchen 

• Central heating and air 

• Extra closet space 

• Wettwr in selected units 

• Private balcony 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 



'withlysar 



Integrated Property Services, Inc 



^ 



SANTA MONICA PANORAMIC OCEA.N- 
VIEW. Ibdnn fumishad ^)anmant $2000- 
$2300. Luxury 2i-1 bedroom, furnished $3500 
Assigned parkir^g Wak to 3rd Street Prome- 
nada&Piar. 310-399-3472. 

SANTA MONICA. Single. $895 Quiet buikling 
Ctoaa to markat^MJS. 1234 14th street, off 
WIshira. 5 milas from UCLA. 31 0-471 -7073. 

SANTA MONICA. VERY LARGE 2bdmV1btti. 
$1950. Quiet buikling. 2-parking. prtvate bal- 
cony. Ctoaa to m«katAHja. 1234 I4th street. 
offWNshira. 310-471-7073. 

SHERMAN OAKS ADJ 



$795-1bdrm. $950-2bdrm Garden ^)ts. Ceil- 
ing tana. A/C. immaculate, parldng. half t>tock 
from UCLA bus «k1 shopping. 816-399-9610. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD 2bdrm/1bth, or Ibdrm+den. 
$1650. $1750 and $1650 Beautiful Hardwood 
Ftoor/Carpala. Stove. Refrigerator Rent in- 
ckidea parkktg. Laundry Room. 310-624-2112. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD Ibdrm/lbth. Beautiful harH- 
wood floors, carpet, parking, stove, refrigera- 
tor, laundry room. $1300 & $1400. 310-624- 
2112. 



WALK TO UCLA, 
WESTWOOD 

SINGLE($1095-t-). 1-f1($1350-«-). 

21-1 ($1950+). 2-i-2($2390 •»■) gated garage, 
pool. waN(-in ctoaat, laundry, recreatton 
room. Jacuzzi, www.keltontowers.com 310- 
208-1976 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 
No Pets 

(310) 208-5215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 

Near Glenrock 



WEST LA. $1500. Huge, bnght fr^nt, 
3t)drm/1.5 ba. Comptalaly remodeled, dish- 
washer, patto. 2 car parking, near UCLA. No 
pets. 310-670-5119. 

WEST LA: 2BDRM/1 .5BTH. Stove. Refrigera- 
tor. Laundry, 2 Car Partdng, Quiet Neighbor- 
hood 2 m»es to UCLA. $1385. 310-829-0386. 



BRENT MANOR 
APTS 

Avoid Westwood rents 
1 mile to UCLA 

Sing;les 

1&2 Bedrooms 

Pool, Near bus line 

No pets 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshire Blvd. 

./510) 477-7257^. 

WESTWOOD 

1BDRM UPPER: Steps from UCLA. Bright 
good ctoaets. kitchen sppjancas. laundry, out- 
door B6Q. 2-car parking. Avalabie 09/02. 
$1300.310-234-8278. 

WESTWOOD PRIME. Ctoaa to VWiga. walk 
to UCLA, full kitchen, flrapiace, balcony, iMjn- 
dry room aact^/floor, rooflop heated poohiat- 
cuzzi. gated garaga/lnteroom entry. $1650- 
$1860. 310-470-1513. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE. MIDVALE N. OF 
LEVERING LARGE 1 AND 2B0RM APTS. 
GARDEN VIEW, DINING ROOM, UNIQUE. 
CHARM. FR0NT4REAR ENTRANCE. UP- 
PER. ALSO LOWER APT W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS+PATK). 310-639-6294. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE Ibdrms $1350- 
$1550. 2bdrms $1800-2250. 1-yr lease. Park- 
ing, laundry. No pets. 310-471-7073. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE: Large IbdmVlbth 
Townhooae. $1600. Hardwood floors, fire- 
piaoe, dining room, parking, laundry, lyr laaaa. 
Aviyiabla 8/15A}2. No pets 925 Gaytay. 810- 
471-7073. 



Diamond Head 
Apartmants 

Resent ^Mrtment tar next school ytm. 

Rent Mrts July 1* 

SInsIc $1045 

SInsle w/loft & 
1 bedroom $1265-1395 

2t>edroom & 1 bedroom 
w/Toft il7 55 

fibedroom w/loft $2175 

Witnin walking dt*t«nc« to UCIA. Gated 
Parkins, Jacuxzl, Sauna, R«c room, 

Laurxlry racllltia*, Ac/Rcfrtjcrator, Stove 
Short term avail Summer discount 

660 Veteran 
208-2251 



WESTWOOD. 2BDRM/2BATH. $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN. STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM. HIGH CEILING. CHARM. 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE. SOME W/BALCONY. 
310-839-6294. I 



WESTWOOD. 5min to UCLA Spacious, 
sunny, top floor, pnvate. 2bdrms/2 full 
baths, large walk-in ctosets, utilities paid. 
Fridge, stove, dishwasher, bakx}ny. fire- 
place. Pets OK. 3-parking spots. 
$1790/nx)nth. 310-470-3740. 



WESTWOOD Walk UCLA. 2bdrm/2bth, gated 
parking, rooftop spa, quiet buikjing, accepting 
reservations for Summer/Fall. $2075 and up. 
512 Veteran 310-208-2655 




{oTj\^QjCbar^gins 

■Marketolaoe7)f student-to-student deals C*^ 



Every Wednesday and Friday the Daily Bruin Classifieds provides Bruin Bargains, a 

place where students are able to advertise absolutely FREE* some of the best deals 

in Westwood. Check weekly for updates so you don't miss out on great savings! 



Item 



LEATHER COUCHES 



Description 



Price Phone 



3-piece. good cond, mtgt selH $100 818-645-4225 



2 FOLDING CHAIR 



n/a 



$3ea 



310-477-6186 



ADOPTADOG 


labmix, fsmate, loving 


free 


310-497-4346 


ADOPT A DOG 


Ditmix. lyr.kwino 


free 


310-497-4346 


BICYCLE 


n/k 


$5 


310-477-6186 


BLENDER 


n/h 


$5 


310-477-6186 


BLUE BUNK BEDS 


bottom bed full size futon 


$185 


31(M43-0053 


CALCULATOR 


ti-30x texas Instr solar 


310-312-2465 


CANON BJC-2100 PRINTER 


w/free Mack ink 


$55 


310-477-6186 


COFFEE TABLE 


& ettdsets 


$68 


626-964-6208 


COUCH 


CREAM LOVESEAT 


$100 


310-993-8064 


COUCH 


yotirs if you pick tip 


free 


310-824-1145 


DESK 


n/k 


$15 


310-477-6186 


DINING TABLE SET 


n/i 


$82 


626^964-6208 


DRESSER 


wood, good cond. obo 


$75 


310-993-8064 


BITERTAINMENT CENTER 


fits t\i; vcr,8terB0 


$30 


310-914-3209 


FAN 


large, high-powered 


$10 


310-801-0476 


FENDEROBANEZ) GUITAR 


Mack etectric. amp. case 


$150 


818-63M648 


FOLDING BED 


new (condition 


$99 


310-825-7703 


FUTON 


black. kx)ksare8t 


$60 


310-996-0285 


GE-ALARM aOCK RADIO 


am^fm snooze bar 


$15 


310-312-2465 


IMATK)N CD-R 


24x1700mM150slimcase 


$15 


626-272-3354 


IMATK)NCD-R 


32x/700mM100Dack 


$20 


626-272-3356 


INKJET PRWTa 


hpdeskiet 400. good 


$15 


310-558-1912 


LARGE EXEC. CHAIR 


grey, good contfitran 


$40 


310-801-0476 


UGHT 


flourescent wall tube 


$15 


310477-6186 


LIVING ROOM CHAIR 


vekNir. high back 


$15 


310-474-5419 


MAC PRINTER 


HP 


$50 


310-429-9924 


PMi^vWWfC 


Daewoo 0.7 cu ft. 


$45 


310-558-1912 


MK»OWA^ 


white 


$40 


310-429-9924 


PARKING SPACE 


kelton/levering 


$55 


310-20fr^)a61 


PENDANT DIAMOND 


14k chain 


$45 


310-474-5419 


PM)NEER STEREO 


VSXD603S 


$99 


310-429-9924 


POPAZON CHAm/crwberry 


$50 


310-914-3209 


PURSES DESIGNBI (3) 


gucciMouis vuitton 


$66ea 


310-474-5419 


SANDWK>I MAKB) 


brand new 


$10 


31(M77-6186 


SHOPPING CART 


nice for shopping 


«14 


310-825-7703 


SM OAK ROLL TOP DESK 


excellent cond 


$125 


310-914-3209 


SMALL TABLE 


n/a 


$2 


310-477-6186 


SOFA LOVE SEAT 


fabric coffee color 


$30 


310-206-0861 


SOFA 


&k>veseat 


$113 


626-964-6208 


SUITCASES 


set of 4 (4 pieces) 


$30 


310-312-2465 


T-SHIRTS 


aH-size. ore-orinted 


$1.50ea 


310-312-2465 


TABLE 


n/a 


$5 


310-477-6186 


TAPE RECORDER 


Sony 


$25 


310-477-6186 


TORCH LAMP 


sMver lamp- new 


$7 


310-825-7703 


TRM^BIMGBAG 


new cond- Hke hr 


$10 


310-825-7703 


TV19- 


Sanyo, w/antenna. Mack 


$50 


310-486-7525 


TV TABLE 


(wooil) in txix 


$85 


310-429-9924 


TV TABLE 


n/a 


$5 


310-477-6186 


TV/VCR COMBO 


Id coior aimosi new 


$120 


310-208-8156 


TV/VCR STAND 


Mack, ikea, good cond. 


$30 


31IW01-0476 


TWWBB) 


box spring & frame (no matt.) 


$25 


310-801-0476 


mnNBH) 


t)rand new, mattrses Ikk, frame 


$100 


310-990-8969 


TWIN BED ^ •• * 


n/a 


$40 


310-477-6186 


TVMNBED 


with tXM 


$20 


310-477-6186 


TWIN MATTRESS 


n/a 


$10 


310-477-6186 


TYPEWRTTER 


syo-in. no system file 


$30 


310-477-6186 


WOODEN FUTON FRAME 


fiill-queen size 


$70 


310-395-4950 



UGHT TABLE 



prof taM e l arge light table 



$100 



310-206-8431 



*Ad must be submioed in person or by mail. No phone orders allowed. Deadline is 1 work day prior to issue at 12pm. Bruin Bargains zppeu every Wednesday and 
Friday. Limit of 4 free ads per customer per week. We rraerve the right to revise or r^ any advwtiseraent not meeting the staiidaids of the Daily Bniin. 

N/A for price is disallowed. 

The Daily Bniin does not authentx:ate, avJotx, or verify the quality of the products advertised with the Brtiin Bargains. In additkxi, the Daily Bruin is not 

responsible for transactkxis in associatkxi with the items being sold. The ASUa> Comraumcatkins Board fully supports the University of California's poliq on 

nondiscriminatkxi. The student media reserves the right to reject or modify the advertising «iiose content discriminates on the basis of anoestory cok)c natkxiaJ 

origin, race, reUgkxi, disability, age, sex, or sexual orientatioa 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 



WESTWOOD: Large 2t)dnn/2bth. Walk to 
UCLA. 2 parking spots. Pool ar>d Jacuzzi. 
Starting July. $1800^1900. 310-624-0833 

WLA/PALMS: Single for $750 (has t>eemed- 
ceilings), 1t)drm for $950. Ctose to 
UCLA/shopping. Refrigerator, stove, ck>sets. 
Pool. 310-204-4332. ask tor Shiriey 

WLA:$710&up. Move-in special. Attractive sirv 
gies. Neat UCLAA^A. kieal for student. Suit- 
able tor two. Definite must seel 1525 Sawtelle 
Blvd. 310-477-4832. 



700 

Coiido/Towiiliouse for Sale 



WESTWOOD on Veteran. Ibdrm/lbth. 
Large private patk}, hardwood fkx>rs, A/C, 
W/D in unit. $259,000. Pool, spa. and gym. 
Myron 310-464-9493. 



^&800 

! for Rent 



GUESTHOUSE FOR RENT: WILSHIRE/LA 
CIENEGA AREA. Nk» Guest house $700/mo 
inckjding utilities. 323-936-7119. 



9400 

Room for R(;nt 



PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH In beautiful home 
near UCLA; furnished, kitchen, laurxlry privi- 
leges, utilities, cable inckided. Ra8ponst)le 
male student preferred. References neces- 
sary. $650Anth. 310-477-6977. Car necaa- 
sary. 

SUMMER SUBLET. LANDFAIR/MIDVALE. 
Shared room. $450/month/negotit>le, free 
parking. Available now. Son>e utilities pakl. 
Roomate gor>e nx>st of summer. MaNta. 818- 
618-5444. 



^^ 8450 

' lis to Share 



WEST LA APARTMENT 

Santa Monica/Bundy. Bachkir, new carpets, 
vertical blinds, refrigerator/laundry. Bus to 
UCLA. No Pets. Available now. $650/mo. 310- 
440-0768. 



8900 

House for Rent 



PALMS. 3bdrm/1bth charming house. 
$1950/month. I.arge yard, fireplace, garage, 
near blue-line. 3700 Westwood. 949-581- 
8660. 



^r^^:mm 8500 

s Furnished 



WESTWOOD. SPACIOUS 2BDRM/1.5Ba 
townhome apartment. New kitchen/carpeting. 
Plantation shutters on wirvlows. Cover park- 
ing. Pets ok. lyr lease. $1845/mo. 310-441- 
1720. 



8600 

Condo/Townlioiise for Rent 



1540 ARMACOST.FEMALE ROOMMATE to 
Share spacious 2bdrm/2.5ba condo. Fur- 
niahad, waahar/dryer, gated parking. $975/n)o 
•fhair UMWaa. 310-457-5523. 

WILSHIRE CORRIDOR 

WESTWOOD. 1bdrm+ den/2bath, 10th fkx)r, 
view, 24hrs security, 2 car garage. $1950/nDO. 
310-475-7533 evening 310-659-4834. 



8700 

Condo/Townliouse for Sale 



IMAGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Comdor/Hi- 
Rise single, 1or2bdrm $150K-$325K. Walk to- 
UCLA/Village, 24hr/security. Spectacular 
views, pool, spa, sauna, valet-service. Agent- 
Bob 310-478-1835ext.109. 



9400 

Room for Rent 



BRENTWOOD, 2.5 MILES FROM CAMPUS. 
Lovely home. Clean room with carpet/Winds. 
Unrestricted parking. Private room/entrance, 
share bath. $550,310-472-7451. 

BRENTWOOD: Atb^active. quiet home. Fur- 
nished, huge private bath. Wood fk>ors. Cable, 
fridge/mkat>wave. 1.5miles UCLA. Near bus. 
Available July 15. 310-472-4419. 

■■"■■■' ■■ ' wr ' ' - 

CENTURY CITY ROOM. iS^Minutes from 
UCLA. $400-$700, utilities included. Fur- 
nished. Private entiw)ce. No smoking/drink- 
ing/drugs/pets. Utilities-Included. Mala pre- 
ferred. Honest people. 310-838-6547. 

FURNISHED ROOM/BTH in North Hills house 
(10-15mins from UCLA). $590+$200 deposit. 
Availat}le June 1st-Summer. Students only. 
818-313-2084. 

MAR VISTA. Private bedroom/bath in new ar- 
chitecturally-designed home. Kitchen, laundry 
privileges, driveway parking, short or \onQ- 
term. Utilities/cable inckided. $775 Beverly 
310-391-1957. 

PALMS- 1 private t)edroom, shared bathroom, 
private W/D, 1 private garage-parkirtg, new, 
never lived in townhonDe, early August. Flex 
lease. Larry 310-880-8727. 



TRY SOMETHING NEW IN FALL 20021 

Rooms availat>ie in frierxlty boarding house 
on Hilgard Ave. $798/month (2/room); 
$705.50/month (3/room); $682/month 
(5/room) includes utilities, cable TV, and 15 
meaJs/week. Female UCLA students only. 
310-208-5056. 



WEST LA ROOM 4 RENT 

WEST LA-Near Westside Pavilton 
(Pkx>&Westwood). Private entiwice, ail utiH- 
ties^cable, private bath and kitchenette. $600. 
310-475-8315. 



WEST LA. Partially furnished room to rent 
Bathroom/shower. No kitchen privileges. 
Cable arxi phone hookup. Sti'eet parking. 
Uundry. $600. 310-979-6595. 



WESTWOOD 

Bedroom w/shared bath in big apt. 2 big wir>- 
dows in room. Really quiet, good neighbor- 
hood. Parlung space, A/C, dishwasher, mi- 
crowave. $675 (includes utilities). 310-234- 
2880. 

WESTWOOD 

VERY SPACIOUS ATTRACTIVE 

2BDRM+DEN Upper. Quiet residential sti^et. 
Laundry, parking, $2400. Available MkJ Au- 
gust. 310-234-8278. 



9500 

Roommates-Private Room 



27Yn.OLD MALE LOOKING FOR TRUSTING 
PROFESSIONAUSTUDENT Female to share 
2t>ed/2bath apartment. $550/nK). Includes Util- 
ity and Cable. Call Donnie: 310-621-3826. 



Display 
206-3060 



12 



THE DAILY BfHJIN -MONDAY. JULY 1. 2002 



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SURF I Surf team unable to find a 
replacement for disqualified boarder 



from page 

ers Williams, Chris Cuseo, Clayton Snyder, Ian 
MacPherson, Jason Sikola, and Mike Anderson; 
Folgner represents UCLA in the women's divi- 
sion, and body-boarder Brent Koops rounds out 
the roster. 

However, the waves of Nationals were not 
meant to be surfed by UCLA this year. One 
member of the squad, whose identity the team 
would not disclose, was deemed unable to com- 
pete due to low grades. 

"Nationals requires you to have a 2.0. ... and he 
didn't," said Williams. "He was going to surf in 
more than one contest ... There were multiple 
problems and we just couldn't replace him." 

Sikola is the only team member who com- 
petes in both the shortboard and the longboard 
contests. When asked to comment on his acade- 
mic standing, Sikola said,"! wasn't eligible 
because I had already graduated, and you need 
to be a full time student" 

The team does have two alternates, ftpent 
T^lor and Lucian Connor, but they were not 
able to compete as neither was going to be in Los 
Angeles that weekend. 

The team, however, has taken the loss in 
stride. 

"Hey, we qualified, that's all that matters," says 
Williams optimistically. 



Granted, qualifying is qualifying, and 16th 
place in California is hardly a bad showing con- 
sidering the intense competition that stems from 
community college teams made of very dedicat- 
ed surfers who usually dominate the competitive 
scene. In the past few years, UCLAs team hasn't 
had much to write home about, save for gradu- 
ated Bruin Amber Puha, who was the Women's 
National Collegiate Champion from 1996-1998. 

"(When we found out we made Nationals) we 
were actually a little surprised, we didn't think 
we had done so well in the regular season," 
Folgner says. 

"We could have done a lot better this year," 
confirms Williams. "One contest was three days 
before Christmas, and so many people went 
home to their families that we had a poor 
turnout The last contest was the weekend 
before finals - which was also a rmyor bummer 
It screws the university teams because we're still 
in school, but the state schools and community 
colleges aren't" 

De^ite the bad timing Williams dted, the 
team is preparing for next year with incoming 
team captain Anderson at the helm. 

Says Folgner, "Sure, I was kind of bummed we 
couldn't go (to Nationals), but if we made it 
once, we can definitely make it again." 



VINCENT 

wants U 




to be 



known for its golf 

from page "H 

down with his predecessor in the coming days to dis- 
cuss the team he inherits. 

In 2002, the Bruins missed an NCAA tournament 
berth by three strokes. UCLA won six tournament 
titles in the last seven years under Sherfy, and fin- 
ished eighth at the 1998 NCAA Championships. 

Sherfy was voted Pac-10 Coach of the Year that 
year; Vincent was named College Golf Association 
Coach of the Year the following year. 

"OD Vincent represents a future of great achieve- 
ments for the UCLA men's golf program," Associate 
Athletic Director Glerm Toth, who hired Vmcent, said 
in a statement 

Vincent is aware that he is one of the best golfers 
among the current NCAA coaches, and he will be 
stepping immediately off the golf course and mto the 
coach's office. Is his latest coaching job just a stop- 
ping point along another comeback trail to the PGA? 

"I have every intention of making this UCLA 
coaching job more long term," he said. "I want peo- 
ple to, when they think about UCLA, think about 
golf." 

And so begins another comeback for \^cent - as 
a coach. 





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fcbWAKU LIN/Daily Bri'In Senior Stapf 

Gadzufic, dunking here against Ca) March 7, was drafled 34th by Milwaukee. 



o24*411 1 Mi^i^114 GayTey Ave., Westwood Village 



DRAF I Both 
Gadzuric and 
Barnes must 

! 

prove worth 

from page II 

tontract commensurate with a first- 
found selection. TWo roster s¥>ots are 
likely to be open, but hell have to 
figtit his characterization as a 'pro- 
ject- 
It's just another thing for me to 
#ork hard at and concentrate on, 
and I think HI grow stronger fixMn it," 
Gadzuric said. 

Pauley Pavilion patrons remem- 
ber Gadzuric as a typically unpre- 
dictable yet occasionally hegemonic 
Tpxeaeaace. Hampered by tendonitis in 
his knee during his first two seasons 
at UCLA, and eternally haunted by 
»oor free throw shooting, Gadzuric 
managed to rise when least expected 

I Near the end of the 20(XH*l sea 
son, his ankle was in a cast on the 
morning c^ a home game against 
Arizona, but went 41 nunutes with 22 
points and 17 reboiaids in the Bruins' 
79-77 overtime upset win. 

I Gadzuric is hopii\g that his condi- 
tioning over the last two seasons and 
relatively ii\jury-free play will put at 
WMt one recurring NBA concern to 
rest 

I "Everybody has health problems 
iii some kind of way," he said. "But it 
depends on how you recover and on 
how fiet you recover. I can jump, and 
ny knees dont bother me anymore." 

I Matt Barnes also ended up on an 
NBA team, though his path took a 
slight detour. After the Memphis 
Qiizdies selected him with the 46th 
dwioe, he was traded, along with 
veteran Nick Anderscm, to Qeveland 
for Wesley Person. 

As the Bruins' starting power for- 
ward for the last two years, Barnes 
UoflBomed into a more complete 
player after developing a respectable 
threef)oint shot and earned Sports 
Illustrated National and Pac-10 
Conference Player of the Week hon- 
ors last season. 

But like former USC center Sam 
Clancy, the Pac-10 Player of the Year 
who went right before with the 46th 
pick, Barnes is something of a 
"tweener" 

.Many believe he is too small to 
play power forward and still in need 
of the precise outside game of a 
small forward, but Barnes' intensity 
attd athletidsm were attractive to 
NBA scouts looking for second 
round options. 

! "It's been a long process, learning 
a lot of different things," Barnes told 
the Orange County Register. "Now 
it's here in the present, and you've 
got to make the best of your situar 
tion." 



••• 



UCLA announced Friday that 
Ryan Hollins, a 6-foot- 11 -inch, 210- 
pound center/forward from 
Pasadena's John Muir High School, 
has signed a Grant-in-Aid to attend 
UCLA. 

Hollins signed a national letter of 
intent with Saint Louis University 
last November but requested he be 
released fnxa it when head coach 
Lorenzo Romar left for Washington. 

Saint Louis granted Hollins a qual- 
ified release, which would allow him 
to play for UCLA but force him to sit 
out the 2002-03 season. He has 
a^^lied for a complete release fi'om 
his NLI, and if it is granted, will be an 
eligible freshman this fall. 

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UCLA Sumrrier Sessions 2002 




need a book? check the h'brary. 

The UCLA Library is a campus-wide network of libraries serving 
programs of study and research in many fields. 

Its principal components are the Charles E. Young Research Library, the College Library, and six 
subject libraries: the Arts Library, Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library. Richard C. Rudolph East 
Asian Library. Eugene & Maxine Rosenfeld Management Library. Music Library, and Science & 
Engineering Library. For Information on all library facilities, resources, and services, visit 
www.I1brary.ucla.edu/summersess1on 



rONI MORKiSDN 

iHC V£ucs7 crc 







Hours 



Reserves 



An Introduction to Film Studies »^^.,^^ 



HARVEY ISLAMIC SPAIN. 1250 



Schedules of hours are available on the Web at 
www.hours. library uclaedu. A map of library loca- 
tions is also available on this site. 

Circulation Services 



The Library uses ERes. a Web-based reserves system, 
which allows students to see reserves lists, check 
availability and, for documents such as online journal 
articles, to access material themselves. For more 
information visit www.ereserves.11brary.ucla.edu 



Library Cards 

A valid library card or Bruin Card is required to bor- 
row library materials Visit the circulation desks of 
the Arts, Biomedical, College, Management, Music, 
Science & Engineering, or Research libraries to open 
a library account 

Self-Service Options 

Several circulation services are available on ORION2, 
the library's online catalog, including viewing one's 
borrowing record, renewing items, and recalling 
items in circulation. ORION2 can be accessed at 
www.orion2 libraryucla.edu 



Reference Services 



Reference assistance Is available in person at refer- 
ence desks in each library, by telephone, or through 
email. Reference assistance is also available online in 
real time at www.help.library.ucla.edu 



www.summer.uc1a.edu 



\ 




f 



ri?l? ?KJ^ ^ANS, READ MORE 
I GREAT STORIES ON THE WEB! _ 

Zartman wins title at World 
university Games 

Attar will transfer to Idaho State 
BCS sconng methods should be 
I exchanged for playoff system 



DAXLYBRUIN 



X 



P^el4 




SUMMER WEEKLY EDITION ■ Monday, July 1, 2002 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 





turn to 




THREE BRUINS WILL REPRESENT THE UNITED STATES IN JAMAICA THIS 
SUMMER; JUNE SEES TRACK AND FIELDERS BRINGING ON THE HEAT 



ByJefrQsent)erg 

DAILY BRUIN STAFF WRITER 
jeisenberg@media.ucla.edu 



ITEI 



i> 



NICOLE MILLER/Daily Bki in 

Monique Henderson will represent the United States at the 
Mtorld Junior Championships in July 



When the worid's best young track and field stars con- 
vene in Janiaica later this summer, a trio of UCLA sopho- 
mores will be in the middle of the hubbub. 

Monique Henderson, Briona Reynolds and Jeremy 
Silverman will represent the United States at the World 
Junior Championships in Kingston, Jamaica July 16-21. 
Each finished second last weekend at the U.S. Junior 
Char.ipionships in Palo Alto, Calif. - Henderson in the 400- 
meter run, Reynolds in the women's shot put and 
Silverman in the men's shot put. 

After running the fastest qualifying time at the meet, 
Henderson finished the 400m finals in 51.52 seconds. High 
school sensation Sanya Richards won the event in a 
record-breaking 50.69 seconds, a mark 0.06 seconds faster 
than Henderson's time in 2000 when she set the previous 
junior national record. 

"I knew it was going to be a tough race, because I knew 
of Monique 's (Henderson) capabilities," said Richards, 
who will be attending the University of Texas in the fall. 
"I've been working hard for it, and I knew I could do it if I 
just stayed focused and ran a good race." 

Reynolds tied a personal best in the shot put with a 
heave of 64 feet 2 inches. The Ail-American finished third 
in the discus as well with a 164-1 1 mark. 

After redshirting last season, Silverman gAie^he team a 
glimpse of his potential with his finish in the shoVput. His 
mark of 63 feet 5 inches was less than two inches better 
than fellow Bruin Jake Knight, who finished fourth. 

In all, 18 current and former Bruins con^)eted last 
weekend in either the junior or senior national champi- 
onships including the likes of former Olyn^ic champion 
Gail Devers and five-time NCAA champion John Godina. 

A three-time wortd champion in the 100-meter hurdles, 
Devers won a U.S. title in the event for the eighth time in 
her illustrious career in a world-best time of 12.61 sec- 
onds. 

"At 35 (years old) I'm stronger than ever," the UCLA 



alumna said in a statement. "I want to run faster than I 
ever have before and learn my event even more so. Then I 
can control my event, rather than have the hurdles control 
me." 

Godina also had a strong meet, placing second in both 
the shot put and the discus. Although he was disappoint- 
ed not to win either event, the UCLA legend was satisfied 
with his mark in the shot put 

"If I have to lose, I would like it to be with a mark of 71- 
10," (knlina said in a statement "It used to be that 70 or 71 
feet would win with 69 feet good for second place. Now, 
72 or 73 feet will win. These guys have done their job. 
Now it's my job to pass them up." 

(iodina, Devers and fellow Bruin alumni Mebrahtom 
Keflezighi and Sheha Burrell will represent the United 
States at the lAAF World Cup Sept 20-21 in Madrid. 
Keflezighi won the 10,000 meters while Burrell was victo- 
rious in the heptathlon. 

TRACK'S TURN TO SHINE 



UCLA surf team 

qualifies for, 
but misses, the 
Nationals wave 

SQUAD SHRUGS OFF 

INABILITY TO COMPETE, 

VOICES SATISFACTION 

WITH PERFORMANCE 

By Elizabetti Newman 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBLfTOR 
enewman@media.ucla.edu 

The UCLA surf team's position as a 
"club" team means that the average 
UCLA student will remain clueless of its 
activities until they send members to 
national competition. 

Well, actually they did Or they were 
going to. The team had the opportunity 
tx) cat£^ult past its position as a campus 
unknown in mid-June, when the eight- 
member squad qualified for the National 
Scholastic Surfing Association National 
Championships held in Dana Point 



Summer is the peak of the outdoor track and field season. 
Significant events include: 



DATE EVWT 

6/14 Triathlon Worid 

Championship 



6/18-6/19 USA Junior National 

Combined Events 
Championships 

6/19-6/20 USA Outdoor 

Combined Events 
Championships 

6/21-6/23 USA Outdoor Track &, 

Field ChampionsNps 



6/21-6/22 USA Junior Outdoor 

National Championships 



NOTES 

Consists of a 1.5K 
swim, 40K bike, and 
10K run. 

Donovan Kilmartln, a 
high school junior, 
wins men's decathkw 

Former Bruin Sheila 
Burrell wins hep- 
tathlon 

UCLA alumna Gall 
Devers wins 100m in 
12.51 seconds 

Three UCLA sopho- 
mores take second In 
their events 



"It's nice to know we can surf 
against the best schools In 
California and ... hold our own." 

Kelsey Folgner 
UCLA surf team member 



Only 18 out of 32 California collegiate 
teams qualified and UCLA barely 
squeaked by with a 16th place ranking, 
determined by four regular season com- 
petitions and the invitation-only state 
competition. The competition at 
Nationals is fierce, and taking home the 
title is something UCLAs surf team has 
never accomplished. 

"I don't remember the last time UCLA 
went to Nationals," says team captain 
Brian WiUiams. "We were pretty 
stoked." 

It's nice to know we can surf against 
the best schools in California and that 
we can hold our own," added first-year 
squad member Kelsey Folgner 

The team is comprised of shortboard- 

8U8Fil»«gel2 



Pro golfer Vincent hired as men's coach 

Athlete will put experience with Washington Huskies, professional 
competition to use in his recently accepted position at UCLA 



By J.P. Hoomstra 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
jhoornstra@media.ucla.edu 

Orrin Daniel Vincent ID was mounting a comeback. 

Vincent - better known by his initials, OD - was one 
of the top collegiate golfers from 1987-1991 at the 
University of Washington. After graduating, his talent 
allowed him to rise \xp the pro golf ranks quickly. 

In 1992, he qualified for the PGA Europe Tour, cir- 
cumnavigated the Eastern Hemisphere for a series of 
international tournaments, and even golfed his way 
into the British Open. 

He never quite rose as high as he wanted, however, 
and he returned to UW as a volunteer assistant during 
the 1994 seasoiL When he was named the Huskies' 
head golf coach in 1996, he intended it to be a short- 
term gig. But five years and four NCAA tournament 
appearances later, the short term had become the long 
term, and the itch to turn pro resurfaced. 

Ife left the Huskies after the 2001 season for the pro 
circuit, and by January 2002, Vincent had qualified for 
his first PGA event, the Phoenix Open. He just missed 
the cut, firing a 147 for the first two rounds. Months 



later, he set a course record at Temecula Creek Golf 
Course in San Diego while on a North American Tour 
event 

The comeback had begun. 

And then UCLA called with a job offer. 

"I missed coaching more than I thought I would!," 
said Vincent, announced TXiesday as the Bruins' new 
men's golf coach. 

"I left Washington thinking my coaching career was 
closed. When I was contacted by yCLA, I thought how 
intriguing it would be, especially at such a great school. 

"I started missing coaching, the relationships with all 
the players, and 1 got real fired i^ to get back into it.' 

Vincent will be thrown into the fire immediately 
when he arrives on campus July 1. It's the first day that 
coaches can begin recruiting high-school seniors, and 
he plans to immerse himself in the workload right 
away, one ear glued to his new phone in the Morgan 
Center ^ 

The job opportunity arose after Brad Sherijy 
announced his resignation on June 3 following seven 
years as head coach. Vincent said he e:q)ects to sit 

YIMCEMT I Page 12 



Gadzuiic, Barnes to play for NBA 



Bruin golfer swings top four finish in Amateurs 



By Kaite RIbeck 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
kfilbeck@media.ucla.edu 

Ttie U.S. Amateur Public Links 
Championship ended last week in 
Sunliver, Ore., sending home 
UCLA golfer Yvorme Choe without 
a trophy but with her morale still 
intact. 

The tournament, sportsored by 
the USGA, is the seventh national 
event the UCLA sophomore has 
participated in. She advanced to 
the semifinals in the U.S. Women's 
Amateur in 2000 and in last week's 
tournament 

Choe's semifmalist status in the 
2000 tournament exempted her 
from a sectional 18-hole qualifying 
cut used to choose the partici- 
pants of this year's Amateur 
Public Link Championship. 

Choe succeeded in beating 
Kimberly Rowton of San Antonio, 
4 and 3, then lost in the semifinal 
round to the tournament's eventu- 
al winner, 19-year old Aimie 
Thurman of Highland, Utah, 2 and 



1. 

Despite her loss, it is safe to say 
this 9-year veteran of golf did 
quite well for herself, advancing 
to the final four among the tour- 
nament's 702 participants. 

"I was happy with the results," 
she said. "I hit pretty well but 
struggled with my putting. She 
didn't make any mistakes. She 
was a good player." 

For Choe, this was her first 
time on the 6,189-yard, par-71 
Meadows Course^ With minimal 
time to practice, added to the 
recuperation factor of just having 
gotten through with her finals, 
Choe's expectations were never 
too high. 

Choe lead the match with a par 
at the third hole, only to lose the 
advantage when Thurman birdied 
the fifth. Thurman won both the 
11th and 14th holes with pars, 
then closed the match when both 
players birdied the par-5 17th 
hole. The tournament ended with 
Thurman 's defeat of 19-year-old 
Hwanhee Lee of Cerritos, 6 and 5. 




FORMER BRUINS 

ARE OPTIMISTIC 

ABOUT SPOTS ON 

BUCKS, CAVALIERS 

ByJefTAgase 

DAILY BRUIN STAFF 
jagased) media, ucla.edu 

It didn't take Dan Gadzuric 
long to start talking like an NBA 
player. 

TVo days after the former 
Bruin center went to the 
Milwaukee Bucks with the 34th 
pick, he was wielding humble 
optimism like the most loqua- 
cious of NBA veterans. 

"I think I'm in a really good 
situation," Gadzuric said. "It 
seems like if I work hard and do 
the things I need to do, Fll have 
a good opportunity to play." 

Gadzuric's analysis isn't as 
cookie-cutter as it may sound. 
Tliough the talent-laden Bucks 
/ missed the playofiis by a single 
game, their lack of inside pres- 
ence became a liability that ulti- 
mately contributed to their bot- 
toming-out in the concluding 
months of the season. 

Milwaukee centers com- 
bined to score just 9.9 points 
per game. 

So while TNT analyst 
Charies Barkley was jabbering 
about the size of his own belly, 
Milwaukee management was 
patting itself on the back, 
delighted to see the big man 
fit)m Den Haag, Holland slip 
into the second round. 

"When that happened, every- 
body was excited," Bucks 
coach George Karl told the 
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. 

Naturally, Gadzuric would, 
have preferred the guaranteed 

DRAFT I Page 13 * 
HEADED FOR THE NBA 




EDNVARD UN/Daily Britn Sknior Staff 

Matt Barnes (left) was a power forward for four years at UCLA, but might play primarilv 
at small forward with the Cleveland Cavaliers. ^ 



\A Sjhhtts InH) 

UCLA freshman Yvonne Choe in the 
U.S. Amateur Championships. i 



The 2001-02 season statistics for Matt Barnes and Dan Gadzuric, taken in the second round of Wednesday's NBA draft: 



Player GP-GS 

Barnes, Matt 31-31 
Gadzuric, Dan 35-33 

SOURCE: www.ut-labruins.com 



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■ THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES 

DAILY BRUIN 



\Serriyi(j the VCIA cimnmwiti^ ffince 1919 



Si^MMER Weekly Edition ■ Monday, July 8, 2002 



LAX travelers undaunted 



www.dailybrum.ucla.edu 



By Robert SaJonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.ucla.edu 

In the aftemiath of the July 4 shooting at Los 
Angeles International .\irj>ort that left three 
dead, many ainn^rt passengers and I '('LA stu- 
dents don't plan on changiug their travel pat- 
terns. 

"If things are gomg to hap^H^n. they're going 
to happen," said computer science graduate 
student Michael Paji, adding that he plans to fly 
three times in the next month. 

Egyptian immigrant Hesham Mohamed 
Hadayet opened fire on the Israeli-run El Al air- 
line ticket coimter on July 4. killing ticket agent 
Victoria Hen and diamond importer Yaakov 
Aminov before being shot and killed by airline 
security guards. 

In response, officials for the newly-formed 
Transportation Security Agency announced 
plans to extend airport security to the ticket 
counters and lobbies. 

Some students said extra security might not 
elinunate every risk at the airport but should be 
implemented nonetheless. 

"You can't prevent every incident," said fifth- 

lAX I Page 2 



More information about the gunman 
Hesham IMohamed Hadayet | Page 2 




USAC to revise fee 
referendum for fall 

OFFICIALS WANT TO GATHER MORE STUDENT 
INPUT SIMPLIFY LANGUAGE AND RAISE FEE 



The A.ssnriATEr) Press 

Police ctose the sidewalk to travelers at the Los Angeles International Airport on July 4 after a gunman killed 
two persons and was later killed at Israel's El Al Airlines ticket counter, in the Tom Bradley International Terminal. 



By Robert Salonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.uGla.edu 

A failed spring referendum to 
increase student council fees may 
breathe new life when its goes up 
for a vote in the fall. 

The Undergraduate Students 
Association 
Council decided 
to revive the 
item after it 
failed to attract 
a minimum 10 
percent of stu- 
dents though it 
was improved 
by over 80 per- 
cent or those 
who voted. 

The referendum originally called 
for an $8.50 increase in the existing 
$24.09 fee students pay USAC each 
quarter through registration fees. 
Councilmembers hope to revise the 
item to raise the fee further and 



USAC previously considered 
writing a letter to the chancel- 
lor asking him to implement 
the referendum anyway, since 
an overwhelming m^ority of 
voters approved It. 



ensure that in the future the fee is 
adjusted for inflation. 

USAC previously considered 
writing a letter to Chancellor Albert 
Camesale asking him to implement 
the referendum anyway, since an 
overwhelming majority of voters 
s^proved it 

But members decided not to use 
the letter-writ- 
ing approau:h - 
last done by the 
2000-01 council 
asking 
Camesale for an 
extension to 
revise its fund- 
ing bylaws - and 
not dilute the 
power of such a 
gesture. 
"We didn't want to do something 
that might cost us later in terms of 
political capital," said President 
David Dahle. 

REFERENDUM j Page 4 




Physicians 



DOCTORS WITHOUT MEDICINE 
GIVE AID WITH INFORMATION 



who 

what 



Doctors Without Borders 

An interactive exhibit housed in a 
48-foot tractor 



MIKE CHIEN/Daily Bri in 

Fireworks light up the sky at Laguna Niguel Regional Park in 
Orange County during Fourth of July festivities. 



UCLA scientists 
study well-being 
of long-term lung 
cancer survivors 



By Emily Leung 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
eleung^media.ucla.edu 

About half of long-term lung cancer survivors are 
^iVJoying a "good quality of life" according to a first-of- 
its-kind study at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center. 

J The findings, published in the July 1 issue of the 
oumal of Clinical Oncology, found that treating 
patients' emotional and psychological well-being is more 
important to the patients than previously believed. 
I "This is the first study that took a look at lung cancer 
swrvivors out there and found out that it's not just about 
the amount of life that people have but the quality of that 
life," sai^ Dr. Linda Sama, professor at the UCLA School 
af Nursing and lead author of the study 

It is estimated that 169,000 people will be diagnosed 
virith lung cancer this year, according to the American 
Cancer Society. Much research has been devoted to lung 
cancer, but Sama believes there isn't enough research 
done on patients' emotional and psychological well- 
being. 

"It is an understudied field because rehabilitation for 
long-term lung cancer patients, those in renussion for 
five or more years, has focused on remedying or manage 
ing ph^ical problems in the past," Sama said. 

Sama and Dr. Donald Tashkin, a puknonologist who 
co-authored the report, originally expected to find lung 
cancer survivors' emotional quality of life to be lowei 
tlian long-term survivors of other cancers. 

CANCER I Page 3 




Bruin Raza 



uIam Tuesday July 9 - Thursday, July 11 
If IICll K) a.m. to 6 p.m. 

AUAfjl^ 1 Film Screening and Discussion: 
UlClllO "Your Money or Vour Life" 

A new docuPDentary on sleep- 
ing sjckness and mv/AIDS in 
sub-Saharan Afhca. 

Thursday. July Tl at 7 p.m. 
Moore 100 



Information Session: 
I "Volunterring with Doctors 
Without Borders" 

Thursday. July Tl at 12:10 p.m. 
Charles Drew University, Kerck 
Auditonum 

1731 East 120th Street 



on a Mission 



DISEASE DISTRIBUTION 

A geographkial representation of cases of malaHa, tuberculosis, sleeping srckness and Kala Azar. 



By Edward Chlao 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
echiao@)media. ucla.edu 

Doctors Without Borders, one of 
the world's largest independent med- 
ical relief agencies, is coming to 
LICLA - in a 48-foot tractor-trailer. 

The non-profit humanitarian 
group is hauling its "Access to 
Essential Medicines EXPO" exhibit 
to UCLA for a three-day stop in 
Westwood Plaza, hosted by the 
UCLA School of Pubhc Health. 

The interactive exhibit, which 
opens July 9, is free to all visitors and 
will highlight the lack of essential 
medicines available to treat five seri- 
ous diseases afflicting different 
regions of the world. 



"We created this exhibit because 
our doctors have been going to 
developing countries seeing people 
who are seriously sick, and we've 
been failing to treat them," said 
Loma Chlu, the West Coast press 
officer with Doctors Without 
Borders and a volunteer with the 
tour. 

"We want the exhibit to speak out 
to the public to make them aware 
that we lack affordable, effective 
medicines," she added. ' 

Visitors start at the exhibition's 
entrance tent, where they spin the 
"Wheel of Misfortune," and are 
assigned one of five diseases - Kala 
Azar (fever, swelling of Uver and 
spleen, and anemia), sleeping sick- 
ness (fever, convulsions, signs of 




^OCTORSWITHOLTBORDERS.ORG 

A doctor examines a child at the 
Hospicio San Jose centre in Guatemala. 

mental illness), malaria, tuberculosis 
or HIV/AIDS. 

"By 'diagnosing' you with a dis- 
ease, we are helping you to imagine 

DOCTORS I Page 3 




D 



Bangladesh nJ^ 



D 



Materia: 

° 500-400 million new cases each yeaf' 
90 percent of whkih occur in Sub- 
Saharan Africa 
" Kis 1-2 mOton people per year 

lubercutosts: 

" 8 mtton new cases each year 
" 3 mtton new cases occur in South East 
Asia 

° 1.5 mjffion new cases occur in Sub- 
Saharan Afhca 

" 750,000 new cases occur in Eastern 
Europe 

Sleeping Sickness: 

" 300.000-500,000 currently If^tected In 

Sub-Saharan Afhca 

* Kis 65,000 people annually 

Kala Azar 

" 500,000 infected each year in Sudan. 
Brazil, India, Nepal, and Bangladesh 
" Nearly 100 percent fatal withotA 
treatment 

JONATHAN WANG/Daily Brun Sta 



J 



Workers evacuated after Aon Newly relocated Arts Library 
Center gets terrorist threat opens with more accessibiUty 

UCLA ALUMNUS AMONG EMPLOYEES CLEARED 
OUT OF BUILDING AFER KABC-TV RECEIVED TIP 



By Peijean Tsai 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
ptsai@media.ucla.edu 

Two weeks after graduating from 
UCLA, Bethelwel Wilson arrived at his 
first day of work downtown only to 
have to evacuate hours later because of 
a terrorist threat ^ 

Hundreds of employees at the 62- 
stofy Aon Center - the second tallest 
building west of the Mississippi - had 



to evacuate their offices early in the 
morning on July 1, following a tele- 
phone tip that ,a plane would be flown 
into the building. 

I Though the threat turned out to be 
unsubstantiated tor a number of rear 
sons" according to the FBI, employees 
working in the building were shaken 
up. 

I "No one expects to be the target of a 
terrorist threat on the first day of 



Weather^ ^ hO V Contact 



NEWS DESK 

310-825-2795 
news^)media. ucia.edu 



VIEWPOINT DESK 

310-825 2216 
viewpcMnt@media.ucla.edu 



THREAT I Page 2 



By Robert Salonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga(i)media. ucla.edu 

Students used to finding the Arts 
Library in Dickson Art Center wiD now 
find an empty room - the library now 
resides in the Public Policy building. 

The library officially opened in its 
new, permanent digs on July 5. Though 
in a sn\aller area than its previous loca- 
tion, it lost no book stacks and will con- 
tinue tx) provide existing services. 

"We're pretty much functioning in 
the same matter as we did in Dickson," 
said Gordon Theil, head of the Arts 
Library. 

Moving allowed several expansions 



for the Ubrary, including network con- 
nections for laptop computers and a 
new multipurpose conference room 
which can be used as a classroom. 

Theil added that the library is now in 
a more centralized location to its users. 
Moving south from the northernmost 
building on campus makes it more 
accessible to the art history and archi- 
tecture departments, he said. 

The new Arts Library is located at I40Q 
Public Policy. It is accessible through 
the southern entrance adjacent to 
LuValle Commons. Operating hours 
remain the same and can be found at 
http://wunv. library, ucla. edu. 



AAEOESK 

310-825-2538 
a&e@media.ucla.edu 



SPORTS DESK 

3108252095 
sports@media.ucia.edu 



ADVERTISING UNE 

310-825-2161 
ads@media.uclaedu 



to 



Index 



Classified — 8 Viewpoint 5 News Bnefs ... 3 

Crossword . . 10 A&E 6 Letters 5 

Sports 14 Movie Times. . 7 




THE DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY, JULY 8. 2002 

DAILY BRUIN 

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Hadayet denied residency in '96 THREAT | Employees return 



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By Sandra Marquez 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — The gov- 
emment had started deporta- 
tion proceedings in 1996 
against the Egyptiar. immigrant 
who gunned down two people 
at Los Angeles Iniemational 
Airport. But the following year, 
the man gained U.S. residency 
because his wife received a 
valid visa, officials said July 6. 

It wasn't clear what caused 
the Immigration and 

Naturalization Service to reject 
Hesham Mohamed Hadayet's 
first petition for residency and 
begin the deportation process, 
INS spokesman Francisco 
Arcaute said. 

A year lat^r, in 1997, Hadayet 
was granted permanent resi- 
dent status because his wife, 
Hala, had become a permanent 
resident, Arcaute said. The INS 
allows foreign nationals to 
work and live in the United 
States if they have a relative 
who is a U.S. citizen or perma- 
nent resident. 

Hadayet's uncle, Hassan 
Mostaffa Mahfouz. told The 
Associated Press in Egypt that 




The A.SW X i ktfa > i k f,s> 



Passengers and airport employees are kept back by police in the imme- 
diate aftermath of the July 4 shooting at Los Angeles International Airport 



Hadayet was happy in the 
United States and had only 
about a year remaining before 
he qualified for U.S. cUizenship. 

"I don't believe what hap- 
pened," Mahfouz said. 

On the Fourth of July, 
Hadayet was the fourth person 
in line at the ticket counter for 



El Al, Israel's national airline, 
when he began firing, killing 
two people and wounding three 
others, authorities said. He 
fired off 10 or 11 bullets before 
he wa^hot dead by an El Al 
securi^guard. 

In response to the shooting, 

SHOOTING I Page 3 



Mideast sees time without fatalities, but attacks persist 



JE] 



The Associated Press 



JRUSALEM — After 16 days 
without an Israeli death in the 
Mideast conflict. Prime Minister 
Ariel Sharon said Sunday that Israel 
had made progress combatting 
Palestinian terror attacks. 

But "deep problems" remain, the 
Israeli leader added in remarks 
hours after Israeli forces captured 
two armed Palestinians approaching 
a Jewish settlement in the Gaza 
Strip. 

Israel's army launched its latest 



incursion into Palestinian cities 
after a trio of attacks that killed 31 
Israeh civilians from June 18-20. 
Since then, Israeli troops have taken 
over all but one of the eight m^or 
Palestinian cities and towns in the 
West Bank. No Israelis have been 
killed, but more than 30 Palestinians 
have died. 

The period marks one of the 
longest stretches without an Israeli 
fatality since the fighting broke out 
in September 2000, although 
Palestinian militants have still 
attempted to carry out attacks daily. 



The Palestinian leadership has 
demanded IsraeU forces leave the 
West Bank cities. Israeli officials 
hint the open-ended operation could 
last months. That has raised 
Palestinian fears that Israel plans to 
dismantle the Palestinian Authority 
and concerns in Israel about the 
costs and new dangers involved. 

Israeh forces could remain in 
Palestinian areas for up to one year, 
until Israel finishes fencing off the 
West Bank from Israel, a senior 
security official said Sunday. Until 
the fence is completed, an Israeli 



presence in Palestinian towns and 
cities would be critical for prevent- 
ing attacks, said the official who 
spoke on condition of anonymity. 

The Israeli official said that in all, 
some 1,800 Palestinians suspected 
of links to terrorism were being held 
by the army and the Shin Bet securi- 
ty service. 

Sharon credited his outgoing 
army chief of general staff, Lt. Gen. 
Shaul Mofaz, with "a great effort in 
confi"onting terrorism," particularly 
during the almost two years of per- 
sistent violence 



r 



LAX I Airport security increases while business resumes 



from page 1 

year microbiology student Keaton 
Hanselman. "But it's necessary" 

Other travelers felt that the 
shooting was a one-time incident 
with no terrorist implications, and 
increased security beyond already 
high post-8ept 1 1 Igtvels is notneed- 
ed. 

'*There;i enough security," said 
DominilM'rischknechte, a visiting 
student from Switzerland. "(The 
shooting) could have been any- 
where." 

The El Al ticket counter was 
closed on Friday and Saturday as 



usual in observance of Jewish 
Sabbath. BoiKjuets of flowers lined 
the counter to honor those killed in 
the shooting. 

The Bradley terminal seemed like 
business as usual on Saturday after- 
noon, with passengers lining up for 
routine security checks and impa- 
tient ^biklmLplaying on, (he iMnu- 
nal BoCMT. 

But . increased patrols were 
prevalCTrt throughout the terrtithal, 
and clusters of poUce vehicles were 
cleariy visible outside the arrival 
area, downstairs from the ticketing 
lobbies. 

Later that afternoon an unattend- 



ed bag prompted an hour-long evac- 
uation of 700 people from the termi- 
nal. The bag turned out to contain a 
broken bottle of vodka inside a case 
with the words "hunting rifle" print- 
ed on it, according to police. 

Still, other travelers argue that 
since the shooting happened before 
the iermiiial security gates, a ticket 
counter should receive no more pri- 
ority than any other public area. 

"I don't know how secure you 
want to be," said real estate agent 
Bill Belloni, who flew in from New 
Zealand via Lufthansa Airlines, 
which operates ac^jacent to El Al. 

There's no absolute way to keep 



terrorism away," he added. 

The FBI, which is investigating 
the shooting incident, is currently 
determining Hadayet's motive and 
has not ruled out terrorism, along 
with personal and business motives. 

FBI special agent Richard Garcia 
said it wasn't known if Hadayet har- 
bored anti-Israel feelings, as a for- 
mer employee of his claimed he did, 
and may have been motivated by 
hWe. 

With reports from Amanda Schapel, 
Daily Bruin Seyiior Staff, and The 
Associated Press 




Be th#l||iito se«|i[^-time 

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begin defense of their crown as they 

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to work with mixed feelings 



from page 1 

work," said Wilson, currently a 
research assistant for the 
TYansportation Foundation, a non- 
profit organization which provides 
information for the Metropobtan 
TYansportation Authority. 

Wilson said news of the threat 
was "surreal," and he thought it was 
a joke at first Still, he was uneasy 
about returning to work. 

News of the threat was "very sur- 
prising" for E>verly Manzana, a 
fourth-year student at the University 
of Southern California who has been 
working at the Aon Center for six 
months with the Transportation 
Foundation. 

Despite the threat, Manzana still 
feels safe going to work because she 
was reassured by the immediate 
response of the Los Angeles Police 
Department and the FBI. 

An anonymous call was made on 
July 1 to KABC-TV Channel 7, 
instructing the network to aim its 
cameras on what was described as 
the "First Interstate Building," for a 
plane would be flown into it 

After being notified by the FBI, 
managers of the Aon Center told 
employees to evacuate. TWo hours 
after the telephone threat, authori- 
ties apprehended the caller. 

Though the threat did not seem 
plausible to Manzana, it reminded 
her how society has changed as a 



result of the Sept 11 attacks. 

"Ever since Sept 1 1, we live in a 
society where the possibility of ter- 
rorism must be seriously consid- 
ered," she said. 

Keeping employees informed of 
evacuation procedures for emergen- 
cies is key to dealing with threats 
hke these, said Tamiko Hirano, 
director of the Transportation 
Foundation. 

Adequate employee preparedness 
for possible emergencies is especial- 
ly essential at "landmark" buildings 
like the Aon Center, as well as other 
notable areas of Los Angeles like the 
UCLA campus. 

FBI spokesperson Matt 
McLaughlin said employees should 
immediately notify law enforcement 
if anything in their work environ- 
ments appears threatening or out of 
place. 

"EJver since Sept 11, all 
Americans live at a heightened state 
of alert We need to maintain this 
high level of awareness," he said. 

Despite the unnerving events of 
July 1, Wilson is confident about 
returning to work. The quick 
response of authorities in attending 
to the threat assured him that secu- 
rity measures are effective in pro- 
tecting citizens. 

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CANCER 

] from pago 1 

TLung cancer patients often face 
more life-long physical challenges, 
hke breathing difficulties, when 
they've had all or part of a lung 
retnoved." said Sama. | 

"Instead, we were surprised to 
find that more than 50 percent of 
long-term lung cancer survivors - 



those in remission for five or more 
years - said they have good quaiity 
of life despite decreased lung func- 
tion," she added. 

Among the survivors who 
reported poorer quality of life, 
researchers found that depression 
had the great<^st impact on the sur- 
vivor's life quality. 

Quality of life was measured in 
four components - emotional well- 
being, so<"ial well-being, physical 
well-being and spiritual well- 



DOGTORS I Goal of exhibit is 
to educate, not induce guilt 



from page 1 

the realities of miUions around the 
world," Chiu said. 

Visitors then walk through the 
exhibit, learning about their dis- 
eases through photographs, audio 
and vidcK) aids, and personal testi- 
monies of patients living with the 
disease. Visitors also learn about 
the symptoms of the diseases and 
the regions where they are most 
prevalent. 

■•For most people with these dis- 
eases, either the medicines are .too 
expensive, too old to be effective, 
or not available at ail," Chiu said. 

"We can't treat these sick peo- 
ple, so now our mandate is to 
speak out and make others aware 
of this problem from our Access to 
Essential Medicines campaign." 
she added. 

Once they are finished with the 
exhibit, visitors meet with volun- 
teer nurses and doctors for a med- 
ical consultation. The medical staff 
aslcs the patient several questions 
and provide a diagnosis for the vis- 
itors' diseases, along with an esti- 
mate for their chances of receiving 
proper treatment. 

"What we're trying to do is give 
students perspective - not to make 
them feel guilty about what they 
might not have known existed," 
said Brigg Reilly, a Los Angeles- 
based epidemiologist. "It's a prob- 
lem not many people know about, 
but it's not their fault." 

As one of the medics giving the 
consultations, Reilly has worked as 
a field volunteer with Doctors 
Without Borders for six years. 

Tlie response from visitors on 
previous tour stops around the 
country has been receptive, 
according to Reilly. 

The World Health Organization 
reports one child dies of malaria 
cvttj 30 seconds, killing two niil- 
hon people annually. 

Equally deadly is tuberculosis, 
and 98 percent of the two million 
people who die each year from 
tuberculosis are from poor coun- 
tries, according to statistics from 
WHO. 

Doctors Without Borders has 
ovef 3,000 field doctors and nurses 
working in poor countries to treat 



these diseases. Chiu said. 

"There's a market failure in lead- 
ing countries because these dis- 
eases mainly affect poor countries, 
and there's no money to be made in 
researching cures for these dis- 
eases," Reilly said. 

"It's also a public policy failure, 
because the government could do 
more to give the industry more 
incentive to research these dis- 
eases. But unfortunately, all we see 
are popular lifestyle drugs like 
Viagra and Nexium (heartburn 
medication)." Reilly added 

One disease which does impact 
the United States is HIV/AIDS. 
Between 1980 and 1999, there were 
430,441 deaths from HW/AIDS or 
3.7 percent of all cases worldwide, 
according to a Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention HIV/AIDS 
Surveillance Report in 1999. 

The report also estimates world- 
wide, 18,800,000 people have died 
from HIV/AIDS, with 72 percent of 
HIV/ AIDS cases existing in Africa, 
and 18 percent in Asia 

Unhke malaria and tuberculosis, 
HIV/AIDS research is prevalent in 
the United States, where 90 per- 
cent of the world's new medicines 
are researched and developed, 
according to Chiu. 

"The message is there are solu- 
tions to getting the drugs devel- 
oped and getting them into the 
hands of people who need them," 
Reilly said. 

When visitors exit the exhibit, 
they can sign a petition requesting 
that "more be done to stimulate the 
research and development of treat- 
ments for neglected diseases." 

The petition will then be deliv- 
ered to the U.S. government and 
the Pharmaceutical Research and 
Manufacturers of America in 
March 2003, when the Access 
EXPO will complete its U.S. tour in 
Washington, D.C. 

The tour started last March in 
New York. Los Angeles is the 
eighth stop en route to 30 cities 
across the nation. 

Doctors Without Borders started 
in 1971 and has over 15,000 volun- 
teers worldwide, according to 
Chiu. In 1999, the group received 
the Nobel Peace Prize for world- 
wide humanitarian work. 



SHOOTING 



from page 2 



the new VS. Transportation 
Security Administration amiounced 
Saturday that it would have armed 
law enforcement officers stationed 
at airport ticket counters and other 
public areas of airports. 

"Had this event occurred at 
another airline counter without 
armed security guards, the situation 
unfortunately would have been 
worse," the agency said. 

FBI agent Richard Garcia said 
Saturday it still wasn't known why 
Hadayet targeted the El Al ticket 
area. A former employee of 
Hadayet 's has said Hadayet har- 
bored anti-lsrael feelings. 

Authorities also had not ruled out 
terrorism as a motive, and they 
were also considering the possibili- 
ty that Hadayet was despondent 
over his personal or business 
affairs. IsraeU officials said they 
would consider the attack an act of 
terror unless it was proven other- 
wise. 

"We are pursuing all three 
motives," Garcia said. 

What is clear, Garcia said, is that 
Hadajyet walked into the airport 
intending to loll. He was armed with 
a .4&<:aliber semiautomatic Glock 
pistol, a 9 mm handgun and a &-inch 
knife: 

His wife and sons, Adam, 8, and 
«Omar, 14, were visiting family in 
Egypt at the time. 

The FBI searched the family's 
apartment and seized a computer, 
books, bmders and other material, 
but released no details Saturday of 
what they contained. 

Results from an autopsy conduct- 
ed Saturday found that Hadayet 
died of a gunshot wound to the 
abdomen, said Dr James Ribe of the 
Los Angeles County Coroner's 
Office. 

Shooting victim Yaakov Aminov 
also died of a gunshot wound to the 
abdomen. The other shooting vic- 
tim, Victoria Hen, who worked 
behind the El Al ticket counter, died 
of a gunshot wound to the chest, 
Ribe said. 

Abdul Zahav, a man who said he 
worked for Hadayet until he was 
fired two years ago, said Hadayet 
once told him he lialed all Israeli.s. 



"He kept all his anger inside him," 
Zahav said. 

A bumper sticker on Hadayet's 
front door read, "Read the Koran " 
However, Hadayet was apparently 
an unknown in the mosques attend- 
ed by most of Southern Cahfomia's 
1 miUion Arab Americans. 



NEWS 



MONDAY, JULY 8. 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 3 



being. Patients rated the fSctors 
on a scale from 1-10 based on their 
perception of their own well- 
being. 

Of the 142 long-term lung can- 
cer survivors who volunteered to 
be interviewed and surveyed, 50 
percent stated that their illness 
had made a positive change in 
their life, while 71 percent of the 
group described themselves as 
being "hopeful" about the future. 

As time passes after a patient is 

.-. ^ — ^ ^ 



diagnosed with lung cancer, prior- 
ities of survivors may shift from 
illness- and treatment-related 
problems to social and interper- 
sonal concerns, according to 
Sama. , 

Fifty percent of the 142 sur- 
vivors who have severe limitations 
in lung function may be working 
harder to breathe, which affects 
their physical quality of life over- 
all. But for some, this handicap 
doesn't affect their emotional state 



of mind or outlook on life. 

"Once you have been diagnosed 
with cancer, you can never really 
detach yourself from it - it's part 
of your life," said Patricia 
Stephens, a 58-year-old limg can- 
cer survivor in remission for seven 
years. "But the extent to which 
you make it central and the focus 
of your life is a choice." 

Stephens is one of the nine mil- 
hon cancer survivors in the United 
States, according to the American 



' Cancer Society. She beheves the 
study will encourage people to 
learn from their cancer experi- 
ences. 

"(People) should find the silver 
lining and use this experience to 
move forward in a way that is con- 
scious and helpful to them," 
Stephens said. "For me, I've 
always appreciated my friends and 
family ... but never have I ever 
been so committed to living and 
loving as I do now." 




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TNEMUYMIM ■ MONDAY. JULY 8, 2002 



REFERENDUM I Council still debating: online or paper ballot 



from page 1 . 

External Vice President Chris 
Neal said it was important for USAC 
to maintain its autonomy and not 
turn to the Chancellor in difficult sit- 
uations. 

Administrators on council said 
UjSAC made the right decision. 

i "It would not be fair to ask the 
chancellor to do something against 



the rules to get it passed," said 
Berky Nelson, director of the Center 
for Student Programming and USAC 
administrative representative. 

Nelson added that the council 
should use the extra time to gather 
more student input on the referen- 
dum before writing the ballot item. 

Dahle said he also wanted to sim- 
plify the language of the referendum 
and reserve more money for the 



community service and student wel- 
fare commissions. I 

Council must still determine 
whether the referendun\ vote will be 
conducted via paper ballot or the 
online ballot used in the spring vote. 
Dahle said with current budget 
restrft^ons - USAC is operating 
with about $30,000 less program- 
ming funds than last year - an online 
vote is being heavily considered. 

1 



Neal said though council is lean- 
ing toward going online for the ref- 
erendum, he has security concerns 
about Internet voting and said coun- 
cil still has to hanuner out voting 
details. 

USAC's regular public meeting will 
be held Monday, July 8 in Kerckhoff 
417 at 4 00 p.m. 




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VIEWPOINT 



MONDAY. JULY 8. 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



DAILY BRUIN 

Sennng the UCLA community since 1919 



Editorial Board 



Ci 

c 



' ■ " ^ liA. Efiuor in Chief 
> Managing Editor 

Cody Cass, Vieupoint Editor 
Kelly I^YBrRN. .VVms Editor 
Edward Chiao. Stqff Representative 

Amy Fhyi:, St(\ff Representative 
Derek Lazzaro. Staff Representative 
Robert Salonga, Si(\(f Rcr 
Amanda St hapel. Stc^ff R- , 



•e 



ve 



UG must respect 
human rights, divest 

The Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Palestinian 
suicide bombings are acts so egregious, the University 
of California has no business associating itself with 
either aide of the confbct in any way. 

Some 166 University of California professors have rec- 
ognized this, signing a petition requesting that the UC 
divest from Israel. The hope is that the dissent of large 
Israeli coiporations from their government^ military 
actions, as a result of divestment, can bring the region^ 
humans h^ts violations to a close where other measures 
have failed Governments may be bull-headed in foreign 
relations, but they are rarely so stubborn when dealing 
with their wealthy citizens, who can threaten to move their 
can>orate opoations to other countries to avoid losing 
money to protesting stock-holders. 

When the university invests in Israeli corporations, the 
profits, in turn, are taxed by the Israeli government and 
heip support the occupation of the West Bank, as well as 
other niilitaristic ventures. Private institutions can do as 
they ptase with their nKxiey, but the UC is funded in part 
by taxpayers, not all of which si4)port helping Israel fi^t 
Palest^iians, or vice versa, however indirect the imnjftfann 
may be. While divestment from Israeli corporations is Justi- 
fied, it doesn't imply Israelis are the sole bearers of blame 
for the human ri^ts violatioi^ If the Palestiniaivs had 
their own state, the UC would have an obligation to with- 
drHw its investments fipom there as well 

The UC's investment portfolio^ not independent of its 
social responsibilities. In 1984, the UC dh^ested from South 
Afhca because it, too, was clearly violating human rights 
diving apartheid But the UC has still not divested from 
Burma, even though its investments there hcip fiind the 
ecorK)mic infirastructure which supports a totalitarian gov- 
ernment In this case, and in the case of Israel, there 
should be no ambiguity about the UC's responsibility, it 
needs to divest immediately. 

TV coverage of July 
4th too sensational 

UiKier normal drcumstances, a shooting aiKl a small 
plane crash would be mourned but later forgotten by 
the gmeral pubbc. 

But Thursday was no normal day, it was the first 
Fo«r1h of July since September 1 1 - the day was built up 
in the media as a virtual apocalypse of terrorism. 

Predictably, the Fourth started out as a slow day in the 
news. But when two people were murdered in a shooting 
at Los Angeles International Airport and a small plane 
crashed in San Dimas, broadcast media instantly spun 
these two unrelated stories into a terrorist con^iracy 
against LA 

The events of the Fourth of July typified a practice in 
broadcast journalism of exaggerating the smallest of inci- 
dents into all-day-coverage-type material News reports 
are made on nodiing more than speculation and hearsay, 
and "experts" have a microphone in their face before they 
have anything helpful to say. Conclusions are drawn 
before the facts are even out on the table. This type of 
sensationalist journalism is driven by ccxnpetition for 
higher network ratings, with limited regard for accurate 
reporting It contributes to the hysteria over terrorism in 
America, since many absorb everything mainstream 
media say as fact 

When the media inflates the news beyoiKl its scope to 
fill air-time, their reporting becomes superficial and 
inflammatory. Having a media willing to extend their 
destructive actions to news events irrelevant to terrorism 
and perpetuate an atmosphere of terror is exactly what 
terrorists want - the coverage of the Fourth of July events 
exemplifies how well this works. 

Tliis is unfortunate. The media has a responsibility to 
keep Americans informed not in fear or ignorant of reali- 
ty as the media did last week. 




design b^^^^^^^^lpi^^'^P an 
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KerckfK)fl^|PPHP^m1Jsts must 
have some l^q^enoe witn Adobe 



Energy conservation doesn't remedy shortage 



S 



uiTjner is heating up, and so is the 
I California Energy Commission's 
'Flex Your Power" campaign. In an 
effort to reduce energy consumption, 
the state has spent the past two sum- 
mers bombarding its citizens with adver- 
tisements aimed at promoting conserva- 
tion. The ads feature 
good Samaritans sac- 
rificing a bit of elec- 
tric power in order 
to avert rolling 
blackouts during 
these months, the 
hottest ones of the 
year. 

Sounds great, 
right? Well, before 
you get up to dim 
the lights and 
adjiist the thermo- 
stat to a not-so- 
comfortable 96 
degrees, I implore 
you to consider the following ques- 
tions: What is conservation, and can it 
alleviate our energy woes? 

The answer to the former question 
is widely agreed upon. Conservation 
asserts that a shortage of goods 
should be remedied through a reduc- 
tion in consumption. The latter ques- 
tion, unfortunately, inspires a good 
deal of contention. But as it soon 
becomes salient, the correct answer to 
the second question follows directly 
frx>m the answer of the first Not only 




urphy 



pujt}^9fte(MiiMMi 



is conservation inc^able of improving 
our energy situation, it is incapable of 
improving the situation of anyone, 
anywhere, at any time. 

We, the citizens of California, con- 
sume electricity (and consume it in 
large quantities) because doing so 
makes us happy. We crank our air-con- 
ditioners up to full blast because a 
cool home is more comfortable than a 
hot one. We do laundry at peak hours 
because it's more convenient than 
waiting until midnight 

Therefore, when the state tells us to 
alter our behavior to decrease elec- 
tricity consumption, they are telling us 
to decrease our happiness. This brings 
us to the contradiction at conserva- 
tion's core. 

By definition, to "remedy" is to 
increase well-being. Thus, the claim 
that we can remedy our energy crisis 
by decreasing our weP being is pre- 
posterous. In truth, conservation does- 
n't remedy the situation in the least It 
simply diminishes our standard of liv- 
ing, thereby creating a temporary solu- 
tion with a pseudo-surplus of electric 
power 

Look at it this way: If we could real- 
ly end the energy shortage by reducing 
electricity consumption, then by the 
same logic, the people of Ethiopia 
could eradicate famine by eating less. 
But the absurdity of the "Flex Your 
Power" campaign doesn't stop there. 
In addition to persuading consumers 



to partake in irrational behavior, the 
state of California has begun using 
higher energy taxes (or lower energy 
tax rebates, which is essentially the 
same thing) as a means of punishing 
those consumers who refuse to com- 
ply. This makes the state's actions 
more than illogical; it makes them 
immoral. 

Now that we have disclosed the pri- 
mary fallacy of conservation, we can 
move toward a real solution - a solu- 
tion that does not force individuals to 
diminish their consumption. Clearly, 
for this to occur, energy production 
must increase. Conservation, however, 
does not attempt to increase our ener- 
gy supply. Instead, it demands that we 
make-do with the little energy we 
already have. 

So why would the state adopt a pol- 
icy that is obviously incapable of end- 
ing the energy crisis? The answer, I 
suspect, is as follows: Conservation 
was never intended to improve our 
energy situation; it was intended to 
further an environmentalist agenda. 
By falsely depicting conservation as a 
logical alternative to production, envi- 
ronmentalists have obfuscated the 
need for creating additional power 
generating facilities. If they succeed in 
stifling improvements for production, 
environmentalists may save some 
weeds, swanks and endangered bugs, 
but they won't save California from 
the energy crisis. Many people in the 



conservationist movement, however, 
are willing to tolerate alternative 
means of production provided it is 
accomplished in an "earth-friendly" 
manner. 

But to the chagrin of consumers, 
being earth-friendly often means t^ear- 
ing down productive hydro-electrical 
and nuclear power plants, and replac- 
ing them with solar panels barely 
capable of powering a calculator. In 
addition, by using government funds 
to subsidize such inefficient ventures, 
conservationists have diverted enter- 
prising minds from effective endeav- 
ors toward projects that the free mar- 
ket has proven to be of little or no 
value! (Ironically, it appears that the 
same defenders of the earth who so 
jealously guard natural resources are 
more than willing to carelessly waste 
our most precious resource of all: the 
human mind) 

Contrary to the claims of its propo- 
nents, conservation, wich is inextrica- 
bly tied to the environmentalist move- 
ment, will only prolong and exacer- 
bate the energy crisis. Through its 
"Flex Your Power" campaign, the 
California Energy Commission has 
done no more than echo a regrettably 
familiar environmentalist mantra: 
Shut-down your business, garage your 
car, turn off your lights and submit to 
death by malignant lethargy in the 
pasty heat of your un-air-conditioned 
home. 




Israeli occupation similar to apartheid 



By Khaled Afi Beydoun 

I commend the University of 
California professors who have taken 
a moral stand against Israeli occupa- 
tion demonstrated by their call for 
divestment lYie sociopolitical reality 
and circumstance of Palestinian inno- 
cents in the West Bank, on numerous 
planes, mirrors the South African 
apartheid paradigm and in some 
re^>ects, even transcends it in degree 
of violence and suffocation. 

To exemplify the parallel, examina- 
tion of the 13 isolated West Bank can- 
tons, which comprise 287 enclosed 
areas, is functionally equivalent to 
the apartheid design of South African 
Bantustans Although the axmlogy is 
vehemently discredited as too tenu- 
ous or absurd by sympathizers of 
Israel, it has been echoed by the likes 
of Nelson Nfandela and Archbishop 
Desmond T^tu (who have endured 
South African apartheid) as well as 
other intellectuals and leaders across 
the globe. 

TYue, the occupation of the West 
Bank is not perfectly congruent with 
its South African precedent but fun- 
damentally cosmetic and political- 
specific differences do not exhaust 
the applicability of the comparison: 
Palestinians in the West Bank are 
enduring a reality where they are sev- 
ered from their families in geographi- 
cally neighboring, but politically inac- 
cessible, villages and subsequently 
have no mobility or freedom, much 
like the indigenous Africans of South 
Afiica. 



Nevertheless, supporters of Israel 
will argue that its championing of 
democratic ideals ultimately pre- 
cludes the applicability of the 
apartheid comparison. This chal- 
lenge, which logically invites another 
theoretical challenge is: if relating 
South Afiican apartheid to Israeli 
occupation is ill-fitting, consequently, 
the comparison between the Israeli 
brand of democracy with universal 
democratic precepts is exponentially 
bizarre. 

Rabbi Norbert Weinberg compiles 
a list of moral/democratic transgres- 
sions that the Arab governments 
have violated, many of which I echo, 
but he also selectively overiooks 
Israel's own engagement in such 
practices. Israel is no novice to de 
facto or even institutionalized racism; 
examining its history and contempo- 
rary dvil society reveals that not only 
Palestinians, but also ethnic Jews 
(Falasha and Safardic Jews), are 
third and second-class citizens, at 
best to Ashkinazi, or European Jews. 

Such stratification along racial 
lines is derived from ethnocentric 
political and cultural roots, and is 
hardly democratic. Further, Israel's 
founding was facilitated by rag-tag 
terrorist organizations, including the 
Haganah and its more extremist off- 
shoot the Stem Gang, who were 
responsible for bombing the King 
David Hotel and intimidating 
Palestinian innocents out of their 
homes. Further, Israel's military prac- 
tices of the 1980s, most notably the 
massacres at Sabra and Shatila, as 



well as the current oppression of 
Palestinian civilians is, in shape and 
consequence, government-executed 
terrorisnt 

Democracy does not function so 
militaristicaUy. In order to superficial- 
ly legitimize and market its democrat- 
ic guise, Israel wiU boast that Arabs 
are allowed to vote and even serve in 
government, but that^is only 20 per- 
cent of the entire Arab population, 
and the result is the handfril of 
Palestinians serving in government 
wield no influence and are alas mere- 
ly tokens. 

However, raising these flawed 
counterarguments is finally irrelevant 
to what is actually taking place in the 
West Bank: a government design to 
systematically isolate, exhaust and 
ultimately di^lace the Palestinian 
people. It is not the South African 
apartheid, but monopolizing that con- 
cept to a single historical experience 
is intellectually stagnant, and refiis- 
ing to accept the analogies is morally 
irresponsible for any person of con- 
science. 

Archbishop TXitu observed "If 
apartheid ended, so can the occupa- 
tion, but the moral force and interna- 
tional pressure will have to be just as 
determined TTie current divestment 
effort is the first, though certainly not 
the only, necessary move in that 
direction." 

Khaled Ali Beydoun is a second year 
graduate student at the UCLA School 
of Law and the Vice President of the 
United Arab Students. 



LETTERS 



Schwartz fails in 
understanding ruling 

His proclamations of atheism and 
boyish grin notwithstanding, Joel 
Schwartz has a religious agenda. It is 
quite simply inconceivable for an athe- 
ist to ever conclude a column by sug- 
gesting anyone "thank God" for any- 
thing. 

De^ite his histrionics about what 
this ruling would lead to, his assump- 
tions are premised on a faulty under- 
standing of the ruling The rulmg does 
not prohibit anyone from reciting what 
they please Rather, it will prohibit 
teachers and other government employ-/ 
ees from promoting a version which 
violates the Eistablishment Clause of the 
ftrst Amendment. Understanding that, 
oBie can eliminate 80 percent of his ram- 



bling column. 



PhipCziao 
UCUMGCS 



Professors, divestment 
commendable 

I was shocked to read three letters 
protesting the UC professors who want 
to force the university to divest from 
Israel, and not one supporting this 
movement. I applaud these professors 
for their efforts and for seeing the 
humanitarian abuses that Israel afflicts 
upon Palestinians. Those in doubt of 
these abuses should take a look at an 
unbiased source - they will find docu- 
mentation of Israel's human rights abus- 
es and apartheid-Uke measures. 

UylaOzgur 



Margin of victory 
crucial to BGS rankings 

Gilbert Quinonez is mistaken if he 
doesn't think margin of victory plays a 
role in determining how good teams 
are. Margin of victory analysis is more 
than just the raw score of points scored 
versus points allowed. It also takes into 
account the greatness of the opponent 

If Miami beats Central Florida 84-0 
and in the same week Florida State 
beats Florida 64-3, who do you think is 
the stronger team? How can you possi- 
bly say FSU ? Miami had a higher mar- 
gin of victory. But now let's also consid- 
er when Colorado beat Kansas State 42- 
38 and then Nebraska beat KSU 55-3; 
who do you think is the stronger team? 
I'd hate to have margin of victory 
thrown out and see Colorado or any 



other team get the same credit when 
performances like that are turned in. A 
win is not just a win. 

The computers with margin of victory 
assist the process and in the end, they 
only make up 1/8 of the Bowl 
Championship Series since they are 
diluted by computers without margin of 
victory analysis. It's up to coaches and 
sports writers to also think about their 
picks and to recognize that mayt>e 
Colorado didn't win by as much 
because it was 40 below zero degrees 
and 90 miles per hour winds. I'm sorry 
that you are so incapable of actually 
analyzing performance that you couldn't 
imagine incorporating a margin of victo- 
ry component. I would have expected 
more from someone who claims to 
know sports and competition on any 
level. 

Anthony FrWMe 



UC failed to 

recognize 

companies' 

risky tactics 

AGGRESSIVE POLICIES OF 

ENRON, WORLDCOM LED 

TO LOSS; FUNDS SHOULD 

BE IN LOW-RISK BONDS 

ay TTieodore Andersen 

TTie collapse, first of Enron in which the 

University of California pension fi»nH lost 

$150 millicMi, and then of Woridcom in which 
the UC lost another $350 million, calls into 
question the investment policies of the UC ♦ 
pension frind management The price of 
EInron stocks fell from $90 to under $2 and 
WOTldcom stock drc^^>ed fixan a high of $62 
to a low of 6 cents. 

Both companies long pursued e^>ecially 
aggressive growth policies that were hi^ily 
risky, which eventually proved to be disas- 
trous. The UC pension fimd manager, howev- 
er, fruled to avoid large investments in aich 
hi^wisk stocks. Management theoiy recc^ 
nizes that the span of management is limited 
Tliis is e£|)ecially true where the econcMnic 
activity is hi^ily complex, where change 
comes at a rapid rate, and where OHnpeCi- 
ticxi is quite intense. Failing to respect this 
principle, the two companies greatly expand- 
ed the line of products they were producing 
and then moved into many new types of mar- 
kets. Woridcom acquired 70 co^^)anies and 
increased its debt levd to $30 billion. Enron 
added 1,700 products to its overall line and 
expanded to 30 nations ^read over six con- 
tinents. 

Muhi-billion dollar companies usually can- 
not grow at a rate faster than 20 percent aiKl 
still maintain adequate control over the quali- 
ty of their investments and costs. Enron, 
however, expanded its revenues at an aver- 
age of 58 percent annual rate during the 
1995-2000 period It is not surprising there- 
fore that it suffered large financial losses, 
was unable to pay its debts, and went into 
banknqptcy on December 2, 2001. 

In r^ard to its accounting practices, 
Woridcom reported $1.6 billion of profits for 
the 15-month period covering 2001 and the 
first three months of 2002. If the company 
had pr(^>erly taken into account all of its 
operating costs, it would have reported a 
loss of $1.2 billion for the period For the 
1999-2001 period, the con^)any overstated its 
profits by $3.8 billion. 

In another questionable activity, 
Woridcom made a loan of $408 millicxi dol- 
lars to its CEO Bernard Ebbers. TTiis loan 
helped contribute to the company's inability 
to pay interest on some of its debts when 
they became due. Additionally, when Ebl)ers 
was forced to resign, the company directors 
awarded him a lifetime pension of $1.5 mil- 
lion per year. 

On the balance sheet, Woridcom rqx>rted 
that it owned $103 billion in assets. However, 
because these assets, for the most part, are 
unable to produce profits, their estimated 
market value ranges fix)m only $3 billion to 
$8 billion. This means that if Woridcom goes 
into bankruptcy and has to liquidate its 
assets to make payments to its creditors and 
stockholders, the UC pension fund cannot 
expect to receive very much, if anything, for 
its large investment in Woridcom stock. 

Pension funds should be invested only in 
relatively low-risk stocks and bonds. 
Accordingly, in the future it is hoped that the 
UC pension fund managers will avoid invest- 
ing in companies that engage in e^>ecially 
high-risk financial policies, such as compa- 
nies like Elnron and Woridcom. 

Theodore A. Andersen is a professor of 
finance at the Anderson School of Business. 



6 



/ 



THE DAILY BINJIN -MONDAY. JULY 8. 2002 



EDITOR'S PICK 



I 



"Seconds" 



"Seconds" 

Director John FYankenheinier invented the 
political thriller genre with "Seven Days in May" 
and "TTie Manchurian Candidate" and made the 
seminal race car film, "Grand PrijiV* Yet one of 
his best films is an intimate character study. 

"Seconds," starringi^ock Hudson, shows what 
happens when you become someone else and 
lose all sense of reality With James Wong Howe's 
beautiful photography and Jerry Goldsmith's 
haunting score, Frankenheimer, who died on 
Saturday at age 72, created a masterpiece of 
paranoia. 



SOUNDBITES 







Sonic Youth 
"Murray Street" i 
Geffen Records, Inc. 

The term "classic rock" often bears negative 
associations, especially for fans of a band like 
Sonic Youth, which pioneered an alternative move- 
ment that split from the rock canon. So when 
Thurston Moore told me in April that the band was 
readying its "classic rock" record (named after the 
street by the band's New York studio, and an allu- 
sion to the Beatles' "Abbey Road*^, and that newly 
instated member Jim O'Rourke was a "huge Rush 
fan," there was reason to be leery of his comments. 

Luckily, "Murray Street" isn't the type of material 
heard alongside typical Arrow 93 material; this isn't 
classic rock but classic Sonic Youth. The familiar 
guitar tunings are here, as are the indier-than-thou 
vocal st>des, but most impressive is the way Sonic 
Youth has managed to make its more "experimen- 
tal" side not seem experimental at all. 

Heavy and driving tunes dominate. "Karen 
Revisited" rolls along with virtuoso guitar licks and 
thick atmospherics, only to drown in an 8-minute 
ambient soundscape. "Radical Adults Lick 
Godhead St>'le" rises with melodramatic fervor, but 
the band sounds like it can do it without breaking a 
sweat And when Kim Gordon sings on "Plastic 
Sun," "I hate you and your fishy firiends / 1 hate you 
and it never ends," it seems as though Sonic Youth 
can give the corniest lines strength with its urban 
cooL 

'Andrew Lee 

Pulp 

"We Love Life" 

Rough Trade Records 

This isn't the Jarvis Cocker we like; it isn't even 
a Jarvis Cocker we ever knew existed Though pre- 
miere Brit-pop group Pulp has always felt at home 
and thrived in the gloomy comers of Sheffield's 
trashiest clubs, simultaneously discrediting and 
romanticizing Eriglish bohenuan life, "We Love 
life" shows that one step into the sunlight really 
makes Pulp wither. 

The problem is that Cocker, the group's singer, 
simply isn't comfortable in the sim. He is rarely able 
to maintain a feeling of optimism within a single 
song, let alone an entire album. The result is a clum- 
sy balancing of contentment and menace. How 
does the harrowing 8-minute "Wickerman" logically 
precede "1 Love Life"? Predictably, there are the 
usual moments of inspired songwriting ("The Night 
That Mitmie Timperley Died," "Weeds"), and 
Cocker's genuine, if overrated, lyrical talents often 
allow the listener to get swept up in a current of 
emotions, but what was once a roller coaster has 
derailed. 

-Andrew Lee 



Superdrag 

"Last Call For Vitriol" 

Arena Rock Recording Co. 

Let's admit it, numbingly formulaic and com- 
pletely lacking in energy, Superdrag isn't too good 
at this pop-purUc thing. It's a shame, too, since 
singer John Davis has a fine knack for melody. 
"Last Call for Vitriol" only shows that fiizzed-out 
guitars and melody can still lull a listener to sleep. 

The band lacks the spontaneity (and therefore 
energy) that makes pop-punk in the vein of 
Superchunk so fun. Here, every song bleeds into 
the others with the same structure, tame guitar 
fuzz, and impotent drums and vocals. The album 
starts with the line "she's one in a billion/ with lips 
of vermilion," and it's an indicator of what's in store 
for the rest. 

But the band throws a welcome wrench in the 
gears by dropping its Fisher-Price guitars and let- 
ting Davis take over with a pedal steel on "Safe & 
Warm." With a distinct southern flavor, the track 
sounds soulful, lilting and more importantly, natur- 
al. It seems Superdrag is more at ease taking it slow 
than it is at speeding things up. 

But four albums into the band's career, it seems 
unlikely that it'll ever learn. 

-Andrew Lee 



Ipaw 

2paw8 

Spaws 

4paw8 

5paw8 



Sucks 

Eh ... Could Be Worse. 

Good 

Great 

CiMSh: 



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ARTSi&ENTERTAJNMENT 



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By C.J. Yu 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 

Qiyu@media.ucla.edu 

For thoKO who are already tired of this 
seasfMrS'lackluNter big-l»iiclget iiio\i<>s. th<> 
Outr«'Mt film r«*Mival may pro\e to !>«> th«' 
sum inert ime alternative that mo\ie-}<oers 
ha\e lieeii N«*eking. 

MthouKli promoted as a "ii»y and Irshiaii 
film r('sti%-al/* Oiitfest also in<*lnd<'s ev('r>- 
thing from live |M*rfornianres to outdoor 
siiig-aloiif^ and ma»»Nive parties. 

Thr— re«*lival kicks olT with an opening 
iiiuhl celebration .luly II. featuring celebri- 
ty appearances and an extensive lineup of 
short fjJins from the past 151 years. With a 
large after-party following the o|NMiing night 
s<-reenings, the organizers of Outfest hope 
for this year to In> a milestone event. 

"Everyone knows that the gays throw the 
liewt party, and this is one of the lM>st parties 
that happen in Los Angeles every year. It s a 
l2-d«y romp through a couple hundred filnis 
from dozens of countries around the world, 
spliced together with over -i't parties and 
rereptionn/* said Stephen (lUtwillig. th<> 
exeratiTe director of <>utf«>st 2002. 

^Thi» festival has something for everyone, 
no matter what th«\v Identify themsel\es as 
t<Nlay or what they might be toniornm." he 
added, j^ 

While the film f«>stival celebrates its 20th 
anniversary this year with an expected audi- 
eiK-e of more than 40,000 |M>ople, the festi\al 
actually has it« humble beginnings at th(> 
ITC^LA rampuH just over two decades ago. 

*Th<* festival was founded by graduate 
«:tndents at Tt^LA in I0K2 who were fed up 
li> the lark of images of any kind in a gay and 
h'shian context in mainstream media, and 
llie_1ark-of opportunities for new gay and 
U'sbian work to In* seen.** (iutwillig said. 

One of the highlights of the festival is the 
••lender the Stars" series, wht're attendees at 



^fc-^ 



the .lohn Kord Amphitheatre have the 
chance to sing along with their favorite 
musical films. This year's musical is 
"Xanadu,** starring "tJrease's" Olivia 
Newton-.lohn. 

"I^st year, we screened 'tirease.* and with 
a little bit of technical wizardry, we were 
able to provide subtitles for anybody who, 
for whatever reas<in. didn't already know the 
w<»rds so that they ctHild sit there in a crowd 
of a thousand people and sing along. It was 
so thrilling because by the end of the night, 
e\erybody was on their feet screaming,** said 
Shannon Kelley, director of programming. 

From independent feature length indies 
such as the light-hearted "Britney Baby. One 
More Time,'* to f<Mir minute shorts like 
"First Kiss," the festival's films cover an 
extensive array of topics with everything 
fr<Mn AII>S to hi^h s<-hool romance. The fes- 
ti\ars emphasis on gay and lesbian life 
brings many from those demographics. 

"The number one thing that brings people 
to the festival is the exclusive chance to s(>e 
th<'ir lives refle<'ted on the screen. In many 
ways, it kind of gives dignity and dimension 
to their lives," Kelley said. 

While the first years of the festival only 
included a handful of student films and lim- 
ited feature length <-inema, this year*s event 
encom|>asses a record 211 films chosen from 
over 700 entries rec«'iv<'d i>ver the course of 
t he y«*ar. 

"It's one of the more fun festivals y<»u 
might attend. Our thought is for it to be a 
festival for everyone in southern California. 
It's a welcoming space Tor anyone, and you 
don't know who's lesbian or gay an.^'way. 
Free-thinking people of all genders and |N>r- 
suasions are w<*lcom«' and expected," Kelley 
said. 




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By C J. Yu 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
cJyu(S)medJa. ucla.edu 

Although David Quantic and Abigail 
Severance may produce films in differ- 
ent genres that touch on different 
issues, they still have one goal in com- 
mon: to change the portrayal of gays 
and lesbians in American media. 

Enrolled in the UCLA graduate 
school of Theater, Film and Television, 
QuaiiLic and Severance have both pro- 
duced student films that will be 
screened this weekend at Outfest 2002, 
the largest independent film festival in 
Southern California. 

As directors, both Quantic and 
Severance will gain the rare opportuni- 
ty for their films to be seen by hun- 
dreds of industry professionals during 
the festival. 

"The happy accident that we happen 
to live here in LA, in the epicenter of 
the entertainment industry, means for a 
lot of filnuuakers an opportunity to 
have their \vork showcased in the city 



that can make lesbian ai^d gay film hap- 
pen in a powerful way. Our festival is 
attended by a lot of motion picture 
industry professionals, including pro- 
ducers, studio acquisitions people and 
small distributors who very much 
make it their business to do business at 
the festival," said Shannon Kelley, 
director of programming for the festi- 
val. 

"At the same time, we place a very 
high importance with being a very 
diverse festival with all kinds of points 
of view that Hollywood doesn't do too 
often," Kelley continued. 

Quantic, who will be entering his 
fourth year as a graduate student in the 
fall, has a short film entitled "After 
School Special" that will be screened 
on Sunday during a program entitled 
The Young and the Restless." The pro- 
gram includes six other coming of age 
short films regarding adolescence and 
teen angst. 

"It's about Alex and Benjamin, a guy 
and a girl. Alex is the girl, and they're 
just trying to survive high school. 



They're both trying to negotiate their 
ways, and they're conflicted about 
their sexualities in trying to understand 
themselves. It was kind of inspired by 
my life, but not very autobiographical 
in terms of the events that happened," 
Quantic said. 

Severance, also a fourth-year stu- 
dent, has two short film submissions in 
the festival. "Come Nightfall," about 
the relationship between a rural 
teenager and a cross-dressing cowboy, 
will be screened with Quantic's film on 
Sunday while her other film, "Siren," a 
visual poem about a shipwrecked 
sailor, will be shown at the festival next 
TViesday. 

"All of my stories start with some- 
thing real, and usually I extrapolate 
and fictionalize fi-om there," Severance 
said. 

While both UCLA students want to 
become directors after earning their 
MFA degrees in film directing, Quantic 
and Severance have already had their 
projects shown at film festivals across 
the country, including the Peabody fes- 



tjval and Sttndanre fpstival, re^* 
ly. Both credit their current success to 
the support and help they get fix>m 
each other, as weU as others in the film 
school at UCLA 

"Abby Severance is one of my best 
friends . . . she's one of the people who's 
always there. I was really blessed with 
a really cool class at school. They're 
now some of my best fiiends in life," 
Quantic said. 

"Filmmaking is so much about the 
group process and everyone kind of 
helping out, and that's what I love most 
about it," Quantic continued. 

Both Severance and Quantic will be 
present at OutCest for a question and 
answer session following their screen- 
ings on Sunday. They encourage people 
to go with the hope of eradicating the 
stereotypes and taboos of gays and les- 
bians in Hollywood. 

"If you go see five programs, you're 
bound to get more of a unique or 
diverse outlook on the gay experience 
than you are with the Hollywood 
films," Quantic said. 



Used CDs attract students, 
threaten recording industry 



By Mk^helle V. Gonzales 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
mgonzales@media.ucla.edu 

Used underwear isn't all that attractive. 
Neither is a used toothbrush. But most col- 
lege students couldn't do without the sale 
of used CDs, and several record stores 
around UCLA can readily fulfill their inter- 
est 

But while the Los Angeles area boasts 
one of the largest and most varied collec- 
tions of stores and music, changes in con- 
sumer buying and listening habits could 
lead to laws that affect the way these busi- 
nesses deal with the college student's 
favorite section of the record store. 

TTie sale of used CDs isn't a new phe- 
nomenon, but growing animosity toward 
the record industry certainly gives the 
scuffed discs an added luster The addition 
of one of the country's biggest record 
stores to LA doesn't hurt either The 
newly opened Amoeba Records, located 
on Sunset Boulevard, houses the largest 
used c(jllection on tlie West ('oast, accord- 
ing to manager Jim Henderson. Amoeba 



carries a selection of used CDs fit)m dif- 
ferent "niche genres" like sections in 
experimental, avant-garde, world beat, 
reggae and more. 

"Students have a broad spectrum of 
interest in many genres," Henderson said 
"Due to student budgets being what they 
are, used products appeal more." 

Student DJs can also find what they 
need for the right price in Amoeba's large 
LP selection The trip down Sunset could 
be well worth it to find a rare CD or LP 

A closer used CD store is Penny Lane in 
Westwood Village. In addition to renting 
out videos and DVDs as well as selling 
movie-related memorabilia such as 
posters and postcards. Penny lane has an 
exchange deal in which people can receive 
cash or store credit for selling used CDs 
and movies. 

Another specialty record store closer to 
campus that caters to the needs of DJs is 
Frequency 8 on Weybum Avenue. The 
store focuses mainly on the underground 
trance and electronic dance music scene 
and meets DJ needs with specialty LPs. 
Frequency 8 also has a set of turntables for 




>ATHAN young/Daily Bri in Sr ^ 

Laty Cahoon, a fourth-year microimmunology and molecular genetics student, peruses 
some CDs at Penny Lane. 



listening to music samples, as well as lis- 
tening booths. 

Rhino Records on Westwood 
Boulevard, south of Wilshire also houses a 
large array of new and used CDs, LPs, 
DVDs and books. The new location that 
opened in January early this year also dou- 



bles as a venue for musicians. The store's 
target demographic is evident as all UCLA 
students also get a 10 percent discount at 
the store. 

"College students buy a lot of every- 

REC0RD8 I Page 7 



Cast, punchlines in 'Oscar and Felix' update stay true to classic 



By Scott Schuttz 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
sschultz@media.ucla.edu 

It's difficult to go wrong with Neil 
Simon's tried-and-tnie comedy "The Odd 
Couple." Playing at the Geffen 
Playhouse, "Oscar and FeUx, A New 
L<K>k at The Odd C'ouple" is an enjoyable 
update that doesn't stray too far from 
the original. 

The story is al)out two divorced mid- 
dle-aged men in New York City, who 
share an apartment in order to save 
money for alimony. However, they 
quickly discover that llie personality 
flaws that annoyed their wives are equal- 
ly irritating to each other 



The original production has been 
redone a multitude of times, and the sto- 
ryline has been tweaked over the years 
to become "The Black Odd Couple," 
"The Female Odd Couple," as well as a 
cartoon in the late '70s with a neat cat 
and a messy dog. And it's highly hkely 
that in a thousand years theater audi- 
ences will be treated to "The Alien Odd 
Couple." 

Tfie only noticeable changes in this 
updated version of the 1965 Broadway 
smash hit are insignificant. The phone is 
now a cell phone. The typewriter is a 
laptop. There is an autographed Mike 
Piazza jersey on the wall. There were 
references to Al Gore and the History 
Chaivnel. The story, however, remains 



true to Simon's classic. 

As long as Simon is penning the jokes, 
the laughter overcomes over-familiarity 
with the material. SimorP, who is 
arguably the most successful modem 
American comedic playwright, gives the 
audience more belly laughs than a year's 
worth of NBC progranuning. A solid five 
or six funny jokes per minute keeps the 
crowd rolling. 

The show has the pace and feel of a 
television sitcom, except that it is fimny. 

The feel of the show is logical, since 
the cast is centered on sitcom veterans, 
John Larroquette of "Night Court" and 
Joe Regalbuto of "Murphy Brown" as 
Oscar and Felix. Their sitcom back- 
grounds have tliem successfully hitting 



all the punchlines with expert timing. 
Helping matters is director Peter 
Bonerz, who is a director of hundreds of 
classic television comedies including 
"Murphy Brown" and "Friends." 

The Geffen's traditional brick prosce- 
nium gives the stage an authentic New 
York feel. The play takes place entirely 
in the s^artment of slovenly sports- 
writer Oscar Madison. This sparse set 
allows the action and jokes to tell the 
story. Madison's room in the beginning 
looks like a messy student apartment, 
but after the obsessive neat freak Felix 
moves in, the bachelor pad becomes 
cleaner than a hospital, much to Oscar's 

COUPLE I Page 7 



RECORDS 

from page I 

thing, new, used and even vinyl," 
assistant manager of Rhino Reconb 
^UfKirea Kusten said. 
I ^Wth so many stores to choose 
tkotty students have the opportunity 
tD pick up some new tunes at almost 
anytime. 

"Having music stores close to 
can^>us is great because you can just 
^ralk to them during breaks in your 
daases to pick up a new release or a 
CD that you want," said Christian 
Lucero, a third-year psychobiology 
student 

Other students have found it more 
beneficial to turn to the Internet for 
their music. 

The dorms provide high-speed 
Internet connection, and the simplic- 
ity of programs like Kazaa, Morpheus 
and MP3 exchanges through AIM 
inake it easier for students to down- 
kwd virtually any MP3 that someone 
eiae has streamed online. But in ^ite 
of, aiKl because of, this easy access, 
the fate of downloaded music is on 
the brink of change. 

On July 17, a court case was set- 
tled between the Recording Industry 
AsBOciation of America and 
Audiogalaxy, marulatlng that the pop- 
liv file-sharing site be required to 
obtain permission fh>m a songwriter, 
Uttisk: publisher or recording compa- 
vff to use and share c<^yrighted 
nuaic. TTie implementation of this 
"filter-in" policy puts power in the 
hands of the labels, who were previ- 
ously the ones who had to pursue 
and pressure the elusive file-sharing 
organizations. 

While the closing of popular music 
download sites will have an affect on 
aludent music buying habits, some 
students feel like technology will 
always be changing and music will 
always be readily available. 

* A lot of people who have the tech- 
nical know-how use mIRC to get 
tileir MPSs," second-year microbiolo- 
g)r student Ben Wu said 'But nothing 
has been done about sharing on 
mlRC or AOL chat rooms so I dont 
think they can stop the MP3 move- 
ment" 

High-speed downloads and afford- 
able CD bumars fit student needs for 
music in CD form, lliere has also 
been an increase in inexpensive MPS 
players. Yet some students feel that 
nothing compares to buying the 
music from the store. 

"I fed more attached to the music, 
like Tm listening to the real thing,"* 
said Dong Lee, a third-year art histo- 
ry student "I think CDs are too 
expensive but what else am I to do? 
So Tm stuck paying for CDs, but I 
think it can be worth it sometimes." 
With used CDs, consumers have a 
balance between value and authen- 
ticity- This is why their sale is becom- 
ing the latest target for the RIAA In 
another attempt to curb the notice- 
able decrease in album sales over the 
past year, the heads of the music 
industry are challaiging the fate of 
used CDs. According to a June 14 
rc|xxt by the San Diego Union 
TUbune, additional charging of royal- 
ties on used CD sales may occun 
RectHd label executives are debating 
a federal legislation that would 
require used CD retailers to pay roy- 
alties on the resale of CDs. 

"Much of what our stores are 
known for is used CDs," said Kusten 
of Rhino Records. "It would definite- 
ly affect the price of a used CD." 

^^^th the shutting down of music 
download sites and the possible rise 
of used CD prices, music buyers are 
being pushed fiirther away from the 
acx^esaibtlity of music. The changes 
in the music market will indefinitely 
affect students' buying habits. 

But until anythmg is set in stone, 
LA's record stores give students an 
ideal selection of new, used, indie, 
rare, and mainstream music, as well 
asi satisfying other musical needs. 



/Ur^jtENTERT/UNIIEMr 



COUPLE 

from page I 

distress. 

The British Pigeon Sisters have 
been replaced with the Spanish 
Costazuelas Sisters as the women 
living in the apartment upstairs, 
who the homy Oscar wants to 
seduce. But the prissy, self- 
obsessed Felix keeps ruining 
Oscar's best-laid plans. The sis- 
ters, played by Maria Conchita 
Alonso ("Kiss of the 
Spiderwoman") and Alex 
Meneses, are hilarious and sexy as 
they fuddle the English language 
with their Spanish accents. When 
Felix asks the sisters - one a 
divorcee, the other a widow - if 



they left children in their native 
Spain, they say "Si, there are mil- 
lions of children in Spain." 

Oscar's and Felix's poker bud- 
dies still play a prominent role in 
the production as changes in the 
apartment's atmosphere over the 
course of two weeks is demon- 
strated in the weekly games. For 
example, the food served at the 
games changes. Sandwiches 
described as "brown or green" are 
replaced by sandwiches that have 
fancy mustard. 

The one real flaw with the pro- 
duction is that even though both 
Larroquette and Regalbuto give 
terrific comedic performances, 
their chemistry seems forced. This 
could be due to the director's deci- 
sion to focus more on the two dis- 
tinct personalities, while reljdng 



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on the audience's fanuliahty with 
their friendship to create a bond. 

However, the flaws are minimal, 
and there are many laughs to be 
had by attending this production. 
And the opportunity to see 
Larroquette, one of TVs funniest 
actors, in an intimate setting is 
well worth the cost of admission 
for this classic comedy that clear- 
ly holds up against the test of time. 

"Oscar and Felix" is playing until 
July 27, 7\i,esday through 
Thursday at 7 30 p.m., Friday at 8 
p.m., Saturday at 4 and 8 30 p.m., 
and Sunday at 2 and 7 p m. Ticket 
prices range from $3 4 -$46 
Student rush tickets are available 
one hour prior to performances 
with a valid student ID. 



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Mon-TTx) 10:45 1255 3:05 5:15 

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Mon-Thu 10:20 10:5012:35 1 05 2 50 

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Mon-Thu 12:30 3:45 7 00 7 30 10 15 10:45 

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Mon Thu 11:00 1 45 4:30 7 15 7 45 10:00 10:30 

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8 



THE DAILY NHJIIL- MONDAY, JULY 8, 2002 



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1850 OMUvtofOK) 
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2500 Tickets Wanted 
2800 MfMM 



Merchandise 



2700 

2800 At^tttfi[^ 
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3000 Ante 

3100Q*vCMk 
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3450 SaAwri»Gvnas I 
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4200 %M£gb|manr 
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1100-2600 



^mllOO 

mpus Happenings 



ballroon@ucla.edu 
Swing-Salsa-Tango 
SUMMER LESSONS 
MONDAYS 7-1 0p.m. 

©Ackerman Union 2408 
ENDS August 26th 
BEGINS SEPT. 30 

Field Trips all Summer 

LEARN SWING-SALSA-TANGO- WALTZ® 7 
p.m. Leam-Popijlar-Line/Folk-Dances9-1 0pm 
www.8tudentgroups.ucla.edu/ballroomdance 
www.geocities.com/SwingSalsaTango Ball- 
room-Dance-Club&lnternational-Folk-Dance- 
Club. 310-284-3636 ballroom@uda.edu 



NOT A CONDOM 



Consider a new vaginal gel designed to protect 
against pregancy and infection. Couples who 
join a major, federally funded study will test a 
diaphragm with either the gel or regular 
spermicide as birth control for 7 months. 



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Col 1 800 521 521) 



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8330. 



SMOKERS WANTED!!! 

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MEDITATION FOR 
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Techniques for creating powerful inner arid 
outer strategies. July 16,18,19 at 7pm 
UCLA-Ackerman Union #3517 Registration: 
310-645-0271. 



Do voii swikv Irom m'\oit Pro-monslriial SvmpHMib? 



UCLA and Berlex Laboratories are conducting a 6 month research study for women witfi Severe Pre-menstrual 
Symptoms (PMS). You may qualify for this study if you experience some of the following symptoms during the 
week before your a>enstrual cycle: 

• Depressed mood • Tension • Irritability • Feeling suddenly s|d or tewTfU 
Qualifying participants must: Ml* • \. 

• Have regular menstrual cycles 

• Be between the ages of 18 and 40 (30 if you're a smokerj 

• Not be using medications for the treatment of PMS, 
including antidepressants, herbal treatments or birth c( 

All Study related evaluations will be provided ttt-i 




Some women will be given the study medicatkxi, and others will receive a sugar piH (placebo). 

You will be paid for your participation 

To get more information about taking part in ttiis study 

Contact Dr. Andrea Rapkin at UCLA OB/GYN 



(3IO)S25-2452 



1800 

Miscellaneous 



ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Your on-campus & orvline bankir>g source for 
students, employees & alumni. Free checking, 
student toans, car loans. Campus office: Ack- 
erntan A-tevel, www.ucu.org, call 310-477- 
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Couples Needed to Participate in a 
Research Study on Everyday Interactions 

UCLA ma* G01-12-OS7-01 

*Couptes wtx> have twen dating for six months or more are 
6ligit)l8 to particjpalB. 

Botti mamban of covpl* rM«d to pw1tc<p*to 

Payment is $50 per couple 
Call (310)794-9108, or 
e-mail: coupl4S_8tudy6yahoo.com 



1800 

JVIiscellaiieous 



^^j^irfeMaij* I SaU)^ 




Pick up a 

RECYCLER 










In the student bookstore and look for the white 
Recycler street racks at nearby locations. 



VOLU^f^EERS between the age of 18-30 with 
norn^al vision, balance and in good iiealth ae 
needed for paid research on eye movements 
at UCLA. For nx)re infonmatkjn call @ 310- 
206-6354 

WOMEN AGES 18-40 with and without pre- 
menstrual syndrome wanted for a 3 month re- 
search study which entails mood dianes, bkxxj 
tests, 2 OPTIONAL spinal taps and taking Pro- 
zac for 14 days. Must not be taking any other 
medk»tion. $360 for your time. 310-825-2452. 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



EGG DONOR NEEDED 

By infertile couple-not an agency, (wife is 
B^in akjmni). Dark hair arvj eyes arxj urv 
der 27 y/o preferred. $4000 or nx)re. Larry 
310-914-7600. 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 1 8-31 
wishing to help infertile couples. 

$5,000 
a^CALLMlRNA (818) 832-1494 ^ 



Pay your tuition 
with eggs ^ 



If you're a woman between the 

ages of 18 and 32, you can earn 

money easily and anonymously 

by donating your eggs to an 

infertile couple. 

Compensation is $5,000 

For more information, please call 

The Ceivter for Egg Options 

310/546-6786 

•The Center tar Egg Options. UC 



3450 

Software/Games 



XBOX FOR SALE 

Perlect conditk>n. Includes: hato, 4 controllers, 
DVD renxjte. All this for only $200! Please call 
310-804-1507. 



3500 

Furniture 



COUCH FOR SALE. Cream cotored, sofa and 
toveseat. $100 for both pieces. Available July 
28th. Stephanie 310-993-8064. 

DRESSER. Wood, good corxjition, varnished. 
Approx. 3.5^x1.5^x4.5^1. $75 obo. Available 
July 28. Stephanie 310-993-8064. 



AAAAAA^ 



transportation 

4600-5500 



T>- ASUClA Corrvnocahon* Do«d h% lupports t» Un~«i«y cX C«*«orn* • p<*cy on nondMcnrrwwtnn No medwr ahrt acc^ lOMnatmtna ^<ctx preeenl persons o« »iy «yn. 
^^f^,^^rS^I^^T*riw^ Ne«h.t*D.#yBai«norm.ASUCL>Connnx«aHK>n 

^^l^Z^^iZL^M^9>•m^nommS^m^mmio^twm>ymt»mwnt»m^^ Any per«xi b*ir«ng ih* in edvertiMmeni »i tf» -eue v«««J me Board » pohcy cxi 

C^C^^^r^^?!!!^!^^ Cl-a«ad a* ■*, appear oo-fcne 

r^!tir2^lM»u^^^ >!«•„*« on-^«o(ia«dai a co.Tp<«»nurvier>«ce tor cuatorrw, and. r«(>iaranteed The Da*y Bnj»i . reapona*)te lor the fir* «oonect »»er- 
t^^^f^Zl^^Z^Mi^icMmrinmmr^t^atMtort^kM^ For »^ re»i«l. 1^e D^ Bn-n Oaaarf*! Department rr^l be rK>tifwJ o« an error on »» «r« day of put*cab^ 



inn only H*nor lypograpNcal erora ( 




FRIENDSHIP? LOVE? European lin- 
guist/writer, good-looking, gentle, cosmopoli- 
tan, accomplished, mature, healthy lifestyle, 
loves literatureAraveling/outdoors. seeks at- 
tractive/affectionate/natural young female, any 
race/origin, possibly romarx^/marriage. 310- 
573-0270/man iwolf@mail.com 



2200 

search Subjects 



HEALTHY ADULTS NEEDED for a research 
study on mucosal immunity at UCLA. The re- 
search study involves medical procedures in- 
cluding blood donations and sigmoidoscopies 
(a flexible tube put into the rectum). Subjects 
will t>e paid up to $100 per visit. To find out 
more about the s study call; Charles Price at 
310-206-7288 Peter A. Anton M.D., Dept of 
Medicine, Principal Investigator. 



4900 

Autos for Sale 



1983 FORD 
MUSTANG 

Black exterior, black interior, automatic. 
Power everything. Good condition. Price 
negotiable. 323-547-8167. 323-269-9960. 



■V'^^*'**'f!*? 






X 



CtASSIFIED 



2300 

pemi/Ec|g Donors 



MONDAY. JULY 8. 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



9 



2300 

Sperin/Ec)C| Donors 



2300 

Sperm/ Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 




EGG DONOR NEEDED 




Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: 

Height Approximately 5'9 or Taller 

Caucasian 

S.A.T. Score Around 1250 or High A.C.T. 
College Student or Graduate Under 30 



No Genetic Medical Issues 



Paid to you and / or the charity of your choice 

COMPENSATION $80,000 

All related expenses will be paid in addition to your 

compensation I 




For more information or to obtain an application please 
contact Michelle at the Law Offices (800) 808-5838 or email 

EggDonorInfo@aol.com 



*nus ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor bank. JR 



% 




For GoHplei Undergoing Fertility Treatment 



JS 



I 



21 - 32 years of age 

Non-smokers, ^slo arugs 

Attractive Oompensation to 
donor, if accepted into program 

Access to Recipients from 12 Highly 
Reputed Fertility Phiysicians 



e * 






I 



Genesis Egg Oonor Corp 
f For information^ 
call Jeanne at...SC^/-^6 1-9622 



B-4-.l'J 



.v.vw.genes4sivf com 
}ear;ne_genesiS@hotmail.cx>ni 




5900 

Financial Aid 



STUDENT LOANS 

University Credit Union is your Stafford and 
PLUS loan lender (Lender Code 832123). 
Campus office: Ackerman A-level. 310-477- 
6628; www.ucu.org 



m A900 

i!os for Sale 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



S680 

Travel Destinations 



' 6000 

Insurance 



1966 SUBARU QL: &-speed. 4-door. 116.000 
miea A/C, dean, tape deck, very good corxji- 
tton. $1500. OBO Tien:21 3-738-8733 

1988 ACURA LEGEND. Gokj. 4-door. au- 
tomatic. A/C. great condition. Yakima b<ke 
rack. SoTYy CO changer 140k miles. $4000 
Obo 310-745-0075. 

1992 MAZDA MIATA. Blue convwtibie. A/C. 
84kn«les. car cover. UCLA pMes. $3800. 310- 
964-4574. 

1996 HONDA CIVIC DX COUPE Red 2dr, 
manual. 80k $6200 obo email 
mhashtPe@yahoo.com or call 310-476-7016. 

HONDA LOW MILES 

2DOOR HONDA ACCORD EX Black Only 
57K miles Manual 1992. Good Condition. 
OriginaJ owner $5900. 310-475-7171 



your 



)/lllstate. 

>AxiYs in good handa 

Mike Azer lr»surance Agency, Inc. 

(310)312-0202 

1281 Wostw/ood Blvd. 

C2 talks. So. of Wllsniro) 

24 Hours g Day Service 



HEsatt 5300 

cborefTC^cle Repair 



CycleTime Company Since 19< 



Motorcycle • Motor Sooolo< * Mupeo 

Sttm • Repairs • Irwuranca 

EXCHANGE AO FOR FREE PICK-UP 

REPAiR. OR PURCHASE DISCOUNT. 

(310) 275-6734 

««32 S La Cwfwga BMl Sa BocM SaM\ of Pico 



p» S400 

i^cooters for Sale 



HONDA ELITE SCOOTER-BLUE-Great con- 
dition, easy transportatkxi to ar>d campus. 2 
Heknots inckided in pnce $700 909-981- 
3826. 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



London $580 

Paris .$649 

Amsterdam. ..$748 

Madrid $871 

Sydney $933 

Far^ IS roundtnp fronn LAX Valid until 

July 1 5th Subject to change and 

availability Tax not included 



BUD6ETH0TELS 
from $18! 



CycleTime Insurance Services 



Motorcycle • Motor Scooter • Moped 

LIABILITY INSURANCE IS THE LAWI 

IT'S LESS THAN YOU THINK! 

No Kidding! Call for a free quote! 

(310) 275-6734 

Exchang* ad kx minimum $10.00 
dtaoount ««Mh Ineurano* purctwM 



61 SO 

Foreign Languages 



TRAVEL 



FRENCH/PERSIAN 

(FARSI) 
PRIVATE TEACHER 

For beginners and foreigners. Tnlingual, 



Persian (Farsi)/French/English. 
aya 310-979-7040. 



Mrs. Sor- 



cst# 1017560-40 



920 Westwood Blvd. 
310.UCLA.FLY or x60795 from campus 



\A/\A/\A/.stat;ra vel.com 800.7*77.0112 



6200 

Health Services 



AMAZING! 
SKIN THERAPY 

Natural peeling. ONE step reduces wrinkles, 
stops acne, promotes younger & healthier skin 
just within 2-3weeks. Results guaranteed. Call 
Iris 310-275-3604. 



Don't call your^iarents 
for extra cash. 



If you're male, in college or 
have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
where you can earn up to 
$600 per month, call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
comprehensive health 
screening . Plus you can 
help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. So if 
you're looking for a great 
job and little extra cash, 
call us first. 




ftexibte hours 
minimal'time 
commitment 



310-824-9941 

or check out our website at 
http://www.cryobank.com/donors 



6200 

Health Services 



DENTISTRY 

TEETH 
WHITENING 

DENTAL EXAM-»-x-ray4cleaning, $60. Reg- 
ular $140. Teeth whitening, $75/arch. 10921 
Wilshire #505. 310-824-0055. vioww.westla- 
dentist.com. Dr. Moe Shammaie. 



6300 

Legal Advice/Attorneys 



IMMIGRATION 

Green Clards, Work Permits, c:hange of 

Status, Citizenship, Visa Extensions, 

Company Start-ups, and more... 



gyAimyiSA^ 



MjL yjSA^NTER" 

Reasonable Rates 

310-837-3266 Fax: 310-559-8479 

email: aiigelctr@att.net u..^ 

Total Confidentiality GuaiaiUced^i 
Privately Ovmed and Operated. 

Proud Member of the Better 
Business Bureau 



6/kOO 

Movers/Storage 



BEST MOVERS. Ucensed. insured. Lowest 
rates. Fast, courteous+careful. Many students 
nx>ved for $103. Lic.-T- 163844. Two 24 foot 
trucks NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO 
LARGE! 1-800-2-GO-BEST VoiceniaiJ/pager: 
800-246-2378. 

JERRY'S MOVING&DELIVERY. The careful 
movers. Expeherx^, reliable, same-day de- 
livery. Packing, boxes available. Also, pick-up 
donations for American Cancer Society. Jer- 
ry@31 0-391 -5657. 



Music Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedicated profes- 
skxwJ. At your home or WLA studk). Ist-tess- 
on free. No drum set necessary. Neil:323-654- 
8226. 

FREE THE BEAUTY OF YOUR VOICE 
THROUGH GOOD VOCAL TECHNIQUE. 10 
years European operatic experience. Eastman 
graduate. Gale 310-470-6549. 

VOICE^>IANO COACHING; Broadway show 
tunes. $20/hr,$40 at your house. Studio 410 N. 
Rossmore Ave. 323-461-5204. David Rishton. 
All levels. 



^gsoo 



^^^^ersonal Services 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Comprahenaiv* DisMrtation AniMMM 
Th0M«, Paper*, and Personal Strtamantt 

PropoMis arvl Books 

International Students Wekxxne. Since 1985 

Sharon Bmt, Ph.D. 

www.Bear-Write.com 
(310) 470-6662 



6700 

l*rofessional Services 



EL SEGUNDO company kx)king for part-time, 
flexible hours, experienced administrator. 
Must be familiar with MS2000 server, MSSQL, 
MS Exchange. Web/Mail server, MS-XP+Of- 
fice. Manage broadband internet/intranet net- 
work for 20+ users. Knowledge of hardware 
troubleshooting experience a must. E-mail re- 
sume and references: Jor- 
danlw@adelphia.net. 

FORMER ENGLISH TEACHER: W/ Masters 
frorn U-Chicago, edits/word processes disser- 
tations, proposals, screenplays, personal 
statements, resumes. International students 
welcome. Winsk)ws:31 0-475-9585. 

MEDICAL/DENTAL 

SCHOOL PERSONAL 

STATEMENTS 

AND ESSAYS. Consulting. Writing. Editing. 
Creative expertise. Also resumes, cover let- 
ters, dissertation formatting. Credit Cards. Ace 
Words, Etc. 310-820-8830 



6700 

Professional Services 



NIGHT OWL 

Research, Editing, Writing. OPEN 24-7. 
Finest quality at reasonable rates. Interna- 
tional students welcome. Call Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 



ALL AROm HELP 

Personal Statements, Papers, Theses, 
Dissertations, Books, & Proposals 

Comprehensive help by PhD From UC 
International Students Welcome 

(323)66S^14S 



PROFESSIONAL 

EDITING 

SERVICES 

Critical reading and editing of manuscripts, 
dissertatk>ns. Multiple pricing according to the 
job. Contact for information or brochure: my- 
writer@att.net or call 818-243-9903. 
www.4mywriter.com 



, 7000 

toring Offered 



AAA TUTOR'S CLUB 

HOME TUTORIf^ for students f»re/K-12. All 
Academic Subjects, including Foreign Lan- 
guages and Computer Training. Call:31 0-234- 
0101 orwww.TheTutorsClub.com 

FOREIGN ACCENT REDUCTION. Communi- 
cate with clarity&accuracy. Especially recom- 
mended for foreign TA's&graduates entering 
business worid. Taught by experienced profes- 
sors. 310-226-2996. www.accurateen- 
glish.com. 

MELANIE'S MASTERS: 

AFFORDABLE 

TUTORING 

Ail ages-subjects English. Math, Foreign Larv 
guage. Computer, Starxlardized tests, sports, 
Arts&Crafts. piano/violin/guitar, singing! 
Babysitting. 310-442-9565. 

MY-TUTOR.COM Math/Physics/Statis- 

tics/English/He brew, chemistry /bio logy. 
Ecor^Accounting, &Frer>ch, Computer pro- 
gramming. Computerized statisticai amalysis 
available. Tutonng service. Call anytime. 800- 
90-TUTOR. 

PIANO/WRITING TUTOR 

PIANO LESSONS and experienced private 
tutor for ESL. proof-reading, any readir>g/wrtt- 
ting skills. Reasonable rates. Flexible location. 
Hamet Gitter: 310-837-0887 



PREMIERE TUTORING 

Premium private tutoring for the LSAT. GMAT. 
& QRE. Intense preparation, reasonable rates. 
Call 323-660-4132 or www.premieretutor.com 

PROFESSIONAL WRITER/TEACHER will 
tutor English, writing, conversations. 
University and High School levels. 
International students welcome. 310-475- 
9585. 

SP. ED. TUTORING 

FOR LD/ADD by PHD educator. Individualized 
program in reading, math, writing, computer 
typing. 310-473-8911 or 310-234-0774. 

SPANISH TUTOR: Native speaker. Conversa- 
tk>nal. Grade levels and all ages. Rexible 
hours. Call Noelle 310-273-3593 

SPEAK ITALIAN? 

TAKE CONVERSATIONAL ITALIAN as a tool 
with your Italian class or just for fun. Contact: 
Lisa Vacca. 323-839-7126. 

UCLA PROF TUTOR 

MATH TUTOR. All Levels of Math. UChicago 
PhD, Assistant Professor at UCLA. Winner of 
teaching award. Call Paul: 310-387-7796. 

WRITING TUTOR 

Kind and patient Stanford graduate. Help wrth 
the English language— for students of all 
ages/levels. 310-440-3118. 



7100 

Tutoring Wanted 



TUTORS/TEACHERS needed for summer. 
Teach all subjects SAT/AP/Elementary. Call 
ASAP 213-321-7955. 




WORD PROCESSING spectalizing in theses, 
dissertations, transcription, legal, psych, 
resumes, fliers, brochures, mailing lists, re- 
ports. 310-828-6939. 




r 



fflEOMLYMUIH • MONDAY. JULY 8. 2002 



4- 



CLASSIFIED 



7300 

WritiiKi Help 



NEED WRITING HELP? 

WE HELP YOU WRITE WHAT YOU WANT 
TO SAY! EXPERT EDITING! ThMW. CM«- 
aertations Essays. Peraonai Statements. 
Manuscripts International stiKlents «ve(- 
oome 818-345-1531. 



I NIG 

I f e e e a rch. Editi 



HTOWL 



irch. Editing. Writing OPEN 24-7. 
f^inett quality M reasonable rales. Interna- 
tional students welcome. Cal Ron at 310- 
S72-6500 




7400-8300 



7400 

Business Oppurtiinities 



' MY TEAM MAKES 
MONEY! 

f^tadbtB. no products, no large inveetment 
You must be serious wxj motivaled. CM Bil 
323-465-2313 (11anv7pnvMon-Sat). 



7500 

Opporttinities 



AD DIRECTOR 

N^OED for a weeMy newspaper. Must be re- 
sponaMe and on time. Wei organized, detail 
ortsmed. sot monttis commMment . student ok. 
MmI have own transportation. Cal 310^68- 



g7[S1. 



^ 



TEACHER/PROVIDER 
I POSITIONS 

special Ed/RSP Teacher 

FT/PT $45/hr+ DOE 

$ 1 000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Speech/Lang. Therapist 

FT/PT $ 1 1 0/hr 

$3000 Sign on bonus for 

1 2-month contract 



Secondary Single-Subject 

Credentialed Teachers 

Subjects: Math or Science 

or Lang. Arts 

$45/hr DOE FT/PT 



Poritioiis are located nVaround 

the So. California Region 

Please fax your 2*esuine to 

909-335-7195 
Attn: Jennifer Langford 
.gonnanlc.com 



t 



Oraoe 



bE PART OF THE JOB 
SOLUTION! 

Asat: A tab with meaning In a profes- 
sional office environment? Cal the Rape 
Traalment Center in Santa Monica. Data entry, 
paek A ship mlsrislB tor national campaigns, 
errands, he^ w/oetabrty event Office experi- 
enie 8tror>g(y preferred. Need car w/in- 
surance. F/T in summer. P/T after 10/11. Com- 
pe«tive saiary-Mnileage. Cal 310-319-4503. 



BIUNGUAL PARENT- 
CHILD SPECIALIST 

For a ful-service youth & community center. 
KYCC (Korean Youth ComnrHjnity Center), in 
L.A.. CA. provide cou na eing servioea. semi- 
na« & wortahope to Korean-American & muf- 
t^-a^hnic immigrant dients. Assist dents in 
acflieving personal, marital, and parental & 
fwiHy development & adjustment m the U.S. 
by drawing upon rese ar ch. I n terview s & one- 
orvone consultations. Conduct parent educa- 
tion seminars reiating to cuMurai issues & im- 
midralion as needed. Mn of Master's degree 
in Chid Development. Human Development. 
FflMiily Studies, or its equivaient required. F/T. 
Fax reeume: 213-383-1280 

COMMERCIAL LONG 
' DISTANCE SALES 

^)ice/dMi/T-1. Aggressrve, establshed com- 
pany pays ktetime residuals on ALL accounts 
Naionwide. Elephant hunters! MUST have tel- 
ecom exponence. MCI crew welcome! Fax 
801-383-5919. 

FT LAB TECHS WANTED for Bio«ech compa- 
ny In WLA. Testing human plasmas Fax re- 
sume to 310-996-1398 or email 
ccNngtfngi.oom. 



600 

Child Care Offered 



AFFORDABLE 
CHILD CARE 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL run t>y 
UCLA grade. Ages 2.5/6year8. Two targe play- 
yards Open year-round 7:30-5:30 Close to 
UCLA 31(M7 3-0772 

CHILD CARE OFFERED with excellent relw- 
enoBS and lots of love Flexit)le. 310-657- 
4588. Can Judy 



7700 

Child Care Wantt^d 



BABYSITTER NEEDED for 9month old. 8:30- 
1:30 3days/weeK Ocassional Saturday even- 
ings. Experierx^e neoeaaary and exoelent ref- 
erertoes required Start August. 310-230-7475. 

GOVERNESS/TUTOR 

LOOKING tor reliable, smart, mature lady to 
wor1( as a govemeeaAutor. Qreat environment. 
Great t>enefHs. Must t>e able to travel al over 
the world. Pay negotiable. 310-642-6226. 

PfT BABYSPTTER needed for 4 y/o boy of sin- 
gle father. Amazing kid. YouH fall In love. Must 
have refererx:es. love icids. and take care very 
senously Call 310-826-7778. 



P/r HELP NEEDED 

NEED PERMANENT P/T HELP for 2 kkJs 
and dog in exchange tor luxurious high- 
rise oorxlo Automot)Me. utilities, and food. 
Located In Wilshlre Comdor- beautiful 
views, covered periling, swimming pool Po- 
sition avaHabie July 1 5th For further details 
Richard Rand 310-466-4251. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our cir- 
culars. For Into cal 203-977-1720. 

$300/DAY POTENTIAL 
BARTENDING 

WW train. Cal 866-291 -1884x440. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASST Smal pension flmi. 
Analytical, bright energetic, organized, 
detailed individual, math abiMy. SOwpm. 30- 
40hrs^vk. $11-13A>r. CM Youn Mee 310-576- 
1030x12. 

ADMINISTRATIVE POSrrK>N. Scheduling, 
typir^g, fHir^. phones arxl fee colec t tons. Morv 
Thurs 4pm-8pm, and Fri 8:30am-2:30pm, 
hours not negotiable. Pay is DOE. DanM Sa- 
lazar 310470-6353. 

ANNOUNCERS, no experience necessary. 
Hoet musicAaNt-shows for our radto stations. 
PfT. $lO-15Air. $2004per/show, plus fantastic 
benefits. 323-468KX)80. 24-hours. 

ASAP MOVIE EXTRA WORK: All types need- 
ed. Wor1( on music-videoe, motion-pictures. 
TV oommerdida. PT/FT Mak» up to $500i/day. 
Cal 24hrs. 323-900-5216 




ASSISTANT NEEDED 

Hourly -f bonuses. 20hrs/week-f Flexit>ie 
hours. wM train. Good aHitude a must. 310- 
234-1190. 

BARTENDING 

S250 A DAY POTENTIAL. Trantng provided. 
1-800-293-3965 ext510. 

CASH PAID DAILY 



$10-$15/HR. PT. Gay arlM teela loliAy 
dearv-shavan mate urider 22 for figure model- 
ing etc. toexperierwed preferred. Danny9818- 
99Q'1<itu 

CHAPERONE WANTED~ 

To house arxj transport 16 year-old female in 
LA area. Mid-July- Aug 31st. wof«^ in the 
Studto CHy area. Transportation and refererw- 
ee required. 915-584-2865. 

CLERICAUCUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

MOr«>AY-FRIDAY 8am- 1pm. West Los An- 
g sls s . $9.50AK)ur. Permanent. Good Englsh 
and typing sktts. 310-826^3759 ext 229. 

CLERK: TIRED OF SCHOOL? BH Law Firm 
ne eds deperxlable derlts. Experience the le- 
gal world. 30hr/wk. $7.50/hr. Fax Resume to: 
310-274-2798. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE/SALES ASSOCIATE 
Greal-etudent-)Ob. P/T-flexible hours. Hourly 
plus borws. Compu t er sldlaA)iingual en eepa- 
nol a plus. Weatwood VHage tosuranoe Agen- 
cy acroes from Rite-Aid. UCLA students who 
have flnisf>ed FreshmarVSophmore year onlyl 
Cal Pat:31 0-208-71 83 



Are you a model... 

or wwont ro <i<>t starrt'cf* 



Loolung for all types 

male/female models/actors 

We alto have Plus size & Children div. 

For pnnt & noo-unioo conunerciaU 

No espeheaoe requtfed. No feet. 



CUSTOMER SERVKJE/TECH SUPPORT for 
tslacommunicatiorra company for telecom and 
Internet services. Near campus, very flexible 
hours. CM 310-828-9900 

DESIGN/SALES 

DesigrVsaies positions for kitcherVbath show- 
room. DanieMe 4-5pm 310-397-1140. fax 310- 
397-3450. 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 

Media lawyer seeking PfT executive and per- 
sontf asaistwit in Santa Monica. M-F. 2:30- 
6:30. Need good phone sidis, computer skils 
arxJ attention to detail. Must drive. 310-828- 
3703. 

F/T AAI. Data CoHection/Entry/Analysis. Assist 
in the collection of references. Cornpare data 
fie analysis and study charts w/database erv 
trtee for accuracy. Fax resume 310-794-2864. 

FILE CLERK 

$8A)r. F/T and P/T, flexible hrs. Near West LA. 

Fax resume 323-938-5827. 

* 

FT SRA I. Exp. in biomedicai research, work 
w/smal rodents. Corxlucting befiavioral arto 
physiological expenments to aooess anxiety 
and cotorectal sensitivity. Assist in surgeries. 
I and btood collectior.s. arxJ processing of 
tor histotogy. immurx>histochemistry. 
ELISA and RNA isotabon. Administer drugs us- 
ing several different routes including oral ga- 
vage arto i.p. and s.c. inj«ction Fax r<»«ume 
310-794-2864. 

GROUP TUTORS WANTED for summer aca- 
demic day camp. 10-6PM starting June 17, 
ending August 30. M-F. Salary $130OKjp. 
Contact Chri8sy:323-937-7737. 



• EarnflOO-taoOatfay , , „^. 

• ZwMkMlninQaJob >— -/- 
PtocanMiTt Indudsd f 

• ir«no«a)ot>-ir>aPARTYlli J 

National BartenilartSchooLA. 




1 (BOO) 646 - IVI.IXX (6499) 



.lll< >l I. ill ). 



7800 

Help Wanted 



HELP WANTED-POSSIBLE ROOMMATE. 
PART TIME PERMANENT REAL ESTATE AS- 
SISTANT/Light house work. References. 
Need Conclencious Person Female pre- 
ferred. $650. 310^20-6059. 

mTI MARKETING & PR firni for luxury goods 
In Beverly Hills, CA. seeks bilingual (Eng- 
lish/Italian) public relation Specialist. Excellent 
written & spoken Italian. Responsitiilities will 
Include: contact with trade and consumer pub- 
lications; assunng editorial coverage; dally 
contact with Italian clients for media opportuni- 
ties; media advertising planning and budgetir)g 
for Italian dients, daily contacts with US retail- 
ers regarding co-op advertising opportunities 
for Italian clients; maintainir>g clients advertis- 
ing database; B.A in communication and 
6montfw min. of experience Please ser>d re- 
sume/qualifications to Alex/Jeri. Fax: 323-653- 
1768 or e-mail: humanresources@ijginv.com 

LAYOUT: Garvey papers at UCLA seeks stud- 
ent for pagination work using Adot>e Frame- 
Maker. 15/hr8/wk. Email resume to Igif- 
ford9isop.ucia.edu by 7/19. 

LIBRARY ASSISTANT 

FT Entry Level opportunity wrth industry lead- 
er Dedicated, detail-oriented, dependable 
person to aooess UCLA campus libraries Stay 
in shape wtiMe you work. Excellent pay. Email 
resunw to tdiOtdioo.com or fax 310268-0701 . 

MARKETING ASST 

WLA Design Studto seeks marketing-oriented 
individual for promottonal campaign. P/T flexi- 
ble, off-site. Computer required. Email 
resume: into® fahrenheit.com 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

WEST WILSHIRE MEDIAL GROUP is a 
tMJsy neurology medical office have tt>e foltow- 
ioQ Ful-Tlme positions open for immediate 
consideration. Front Desk. Ptiysical Therapy 
Asaiatant. Ptiyaician's Asaistant, transcription- 
Ist. URraaound lecfviiclan. X-ray technician 
an6 medical blHer. Requirements, e)qperierK:e 
neoeaaary, muli-task person required, de- 
parKlabla, punctual, computer literate, and 
learn player. Fax resume :3 10-479-4220, or 
email: aaaicoOeanfilnk.net 

NATIONAL MODEL SEARCH discovering new 
faces artd talenti Free auditior>s! For upcoming 
TV shows! Cal 310-360-1240 or 310-360- 
6092. 

NUTRITION PERSONAL 
ASSISTANT 

Help research study dealing wA>aby food. Bev- 
erly Hils. $1500ATionth. F/T. P/T OK. 8anv 
6pm 310-273-5618, 310-801-1299, fax 310- 
274-2886. 

OFFICER MANAGER Will train to manage of- 
fice. Computer knowledge. M-F. 30-40hrs/wk. 
Salary-^Benefits. 310-476-4205. 

PART-TIME PERSONAL ASSISTANT to run 
errarxls and do basic schduHng ar)d househoto 
tasks. Work 3 AM's per week approx. 1 5hrs. 
Need to have own car and like dogs. $11- 
1 2Air. Start ASAP and continue through school 
year. Fax Resume: 310-472-5158. I 

PERMANENT POSITION Mon-Thurs 9am- 
4pm at UCLA Doctor's Office. No health In- 
surar)ce. Multi-task/busy office. Filing/ 
phones/scheduling. $10/hr. Please send re- 
sume fax:310-824-2781. 

PHYSCAL THERAPY AID. FULL-TIME, occa- 
storMd Saturdays. Fast paced, out patient of- 
floe in Culver City. Well b-ajned. nnassage skills 
a pkJS. Fax resume: 310-837-9701. 

PRE-MED: P/T positk>n at the Jules Stein Eye 
Institute. Min. 3.5GPA. Approx. lOhrs/wk. 
Please fax resume 310-794-7904 Attn: Veroni- 
ca or call 310-825-4749. 

PRIVATE ASSAYER Magazine of IndivkJual 
Urtoary Studies wants writers. Must be over 
21. Cal Mr. Vbndegrifl: 310-207-4671. 

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Westwood Vil- 
lage productton company hiring student PA. 
Camera. Editlrig, Submissions. Errarnls. 
Clean driving record a must. UCLA Students 
wtK> have completed Freshman/Sophnx)re 
year only. Cal Patrick-.31 0-208-7 183. 

PROMOTIONS REPRESENTATIVE: Film ad- 
vertising. Call retail stores for upcoming re- 
leasee. CoordiruUe store visits. Bilingual pre- 
ferred. P/T-F/T-8am-12pm or 12:30pm- 
4.-30pm-flex.$9/hr4bonus. 310-289-2194. 

PT RECEPTIONIST POSITION. Afternoons. 
Century City Law Office. $10/hr. Fax resume 
310-282-8117. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT 

To do Internet studies. Part-time or full-time. 
Fax Resume to 310-450-1311. or E-mail: 
rg9pmsmart.com. 

RETAIL SALES 

PT/FT. Sepulveda Blvd. Designer wed- 
ding/evening gowns. Experience preferred, 
nnotivated ar>d fnendfy. Great opportunity. Sal- 
ary/commissions/twnuses Excellent $$. 310- 
474-7808 Pauline. 

SECRETARY 

Halftime, nx>mir>gs, to RN at VA medical cen- 
ter. WLA. Proficient in word and excel. $11 /hr. 
Job starts 08/01/02 and ends ^2/3^l02. Fax 
reaume to Susan Orrange. 310-268-4404. 



SECRETARY/ 

ADMINISTRATOR 

/EVENT 

PLANNER 

FANTASEA 

YACHTS 

& YACHT Club 

The best yacht charter and special event 
company Is tooking for an articulate, detail 

conscious and high energy individual to 
assist tfte owner in secretanal. administra- 
tive and event planning duties. www.far>ta- 

seayachts.com Fax resume: 310-827- 
7453, email: danlel@fantaseayachts.com 



SWIM COACH NEEDED 

From Aug26-Nov for pnvate middle school. 
Must have prevkjus experience, CPR certified. 
Interviews June-Aug 20th. Rachael:323-461- 
3651. 

TELEMARKETER for Fixed Wireless ISP 
Generate leads, dose sales, inform customers 
about products. Full-time, 12-8pm. Hourty $8- 
1$2. Telecom krK>wledge preferred. Email 
am y 9 speedt)arKl . com . 



7800 

Help Wanted 



TELEMARKETING 
$1Q/HR 

EXPERIENCE energetk; and motivated peo- 
ple wanted for appointment settings and sales. 
Paid weekly Great West Hollywood k)cation. 
Call Rita. 310-273-9631. 



THIRD YEAR LAW STUDENT WANTED. 
Begins. 08/12/02. Assist in connection w/eider 
abuse lltigatton and legal research In a nunv 
ber of substantive areas. 15hrs/wk. Salary 
open. Send resume; Shekton Rubin, Esq. Ru- 
bin. Eagan & Kane, LLP Fax 310-788-0984, 
phone 310-788-0983. 

URINARY FRACTIONS Magazine wants writ- 
ers. Must be over 21 . Call Mr. Vendegrlft: 310- 
207-4671. 

WANTED: 29 people to tose weight. Earn $$$ 
for the pounds and Indies you tose Safe. 
Doctor recommended. 800-296-0477 www.to- 
selikemagk:.com 

WANTED: MARKETING 
GURU 

Mfmage a marketing campaign, earn w/ger>er- 
ous commission, and work on your own 
schedule. For information, please visit 
www.gizmo-la com/guenllamarketing. 



7900 

Hotisesittiiui 



HOUSESITTER 

21 or okler male to occastonally housesit arxl 
keep track of high school senior. Up to 
2wks/lime. Beverly Hills- 10 min from campus. 
Poot/gym. Room+board-i<3enerous per diem. 
310-285^)902. 



'%M^^^t 



m 8000 

eriiships 



MUSIC AGENCY INTERNSHIP Database en- 
try arxJ Management. General Office Duties. 
Looking for someone w/ strong work ethk;, self 
PDOtivation, good sense of style and humor. 
Please email resume: robertb® buNymu- 
sto.oom or fax to 310-481-3968. 



8200 

Temporary Employnient 



TEMPORARY STAFF NEEDED for retail 
ctothing at Mercedes Benz Cup Tennis Tour- 
nament at UCLA Tennis Center July 22-28. 
Call Jack 760-360-4086 



8300 

Volunteer 



VOLUNTEERING 

VOLUffTEER OPPORTUNITIES available at 
youth hostel in Santa Monica. Meet intenrta- 
tional ti'avelers. Gain job skills. Lucy 310-393- 
9913x18. 




housing 

8400-9800 



8400 

.ents for Rent 



1 -MINUTE TO UCLA 

Studto, furnished, dean, security entrance, 
separate kitchen, laundry room, pool, lyr 
lease. $850/nx>. 310-824-1830. 

1380 VETERAN-lbdrm/lbth. $1395(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi. Intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all appHarx^es. Move-in 
ASAP. Pets constoered. 310-477-5108. 

1380 VETERAN-2bdrm/2bth. $1795(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi, intercom enti^, 
gated parking, laundry, all appliances. Move-in 
ASAP. Pets constoered. 310-477-5108. 



WESTWO 
PLAZ 



Studios S1 100-1200 

1 bedroom.$ 1350- 1600 

Summer discount available. 
Call for details 

Paiidfig AvaiiaMe. 
^ WaNdng cttstwKe to cnnptis. 

310-208-8505 



2BDRM+L0FT 

W/fireplace and refrigerator Ctose to UCLA 
and Century City. 1823 Pelham Ave, LA 
90025. $1900. 310-472-4951 . 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1 ,243BEDROOM, 
$925&UP LARGE. UNUSUAL CHARM. 
SOME SPANISH STYLE W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS. ONLY HALF BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS. 310-839-6294. 

BEVERLY HILLS APT 

TWO BEDROOM/1 BATH to share. Large, 
sunny, three windows, huge doset space. 
Grad student preferred. $90O»-utilities. 310- 
271-6072 

BRENTWOOD ADJACENT $1290, Cozy 
2bedroom/1bath. 2-car tandem parking. Ctose 
to Wllshire/UCLA freeway. Lease to 2. No 
Pets 1333 Barry. 310-826-8461. 

BRENTWOOD ADJCNT $1195-$1775, 1- 
bdrms/2-bdrms/2-baths. Newly Decorated, 
Quiet buikling. BulIt-in/Bookcase/Center. 
Light, w/view. X-Large, PatiosA Parking. 
UCLA/1 0-min, No Pets. Faculaty/Staff/Grads. 
1-yr.lease 310-453-5000. 310-238-2222. 

BRENTWOOD ONE BEDROOM LOWER and 
garden setting. Huge patto, new kitchen, all 
appliances, fireplace, hardwood floors. One 
year lease. No Pets. 11644 Montana Ave. 
Available June. $1500. Call: 310-410-1575. 

BRENTWOOD. Bachetor pad, fridge, hard- 
wood floors, pool, paricing, $700. 310-395- 
RENT. www.westsiderentals.com 





A health advice service 

E nirjii y'jur non emergency health 
que.'^fions 'o the Ashe Center one 

they 11 f X you 'ight up by e Tiaiung 
yOi/ back ii^ually •-'ifhin 24 hours, 
vv th all ti'ifi answers 

shsmail@saonef.ucia.edu 



ucia Ashe Center 



A'.-aeditr.d bv AAAHC / 2002 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Handed over 
6 Climb up a pole 
10 Leaning Tower site 

14 Practice 

15 Eggplant cotor 

16 Belgian river 

17 Zippy flavors 

18 Part of NYU 

19 Uncommon, to 
Claudius 

20. Adds honey 

22 Of durable wood 

23 Student's need 

24 Cozy 

26 Far bast temple 
29 Inherited (2 wds.) 

33 Mideast nation 

34 Not cool 

36 Twosomes 

37 Baby seal 

38 Wiedersehen 

39 Put down, slangily 

40 Nov. event 
42 Restless 

44 Ham-on-rye source 

45 Asset 

47 Hair foam 

49 TV statuette 

50 Quicksand 

51 — incognita 
54 Never weary 

58 Wrth.toRerre 

59 Persuade 

61 Quota 

62 Shaft locale 

63 Competent 

64 Catty 

65 Husky vehide 

66 Were rivals 

67 White heron 

CX)WN 

1 Cleans a fish 

2 What "vidi" means 
(2 wds.) 

3 Windmill blade 

4 Incited (2 wds.) 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



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7-«^D2 



§j 2002 Untted Feature Syndicate Inc 



5 Raised a brood 

6 Gumption 

7 Attila's horde 

8 Here, In France 

9 Comstock Lode 

St. 

10 Pharaoh's tomb 

1 1 Author - 
Dinesen 

12 Withered 

13 Gal way Bay 
islands 

21 Genesis hunter 

22 Mother lode 

24 Street kids 

25 Rock-band 
need 

26 Kilted musician 

27 As 

(generally) 

28 Stares at 

29 Water slide 

30 Rubens' rrxxlels 

31 Slaves 

32 Davis of 'Get 



On the Bus" 
35 Reagan or 
Walker 

41 Forced 

42 Jacket feature 

43 Norse giant 

44 Fencing 
46 Thurman 

48 Thieat (2 wds.) 

50 Stifred up 

51 Bmn/ts 

52 Black-hearted 

53 Artist - 
Magritte 

54 Le^nd 

55 Arab leader 

56 Fries or slaw 

57 Procter's word 

59 Cleveland 
hoopster 

60 Geisha's 
accessory 




ts^s^sss^i 



8^00 

ts for Rent 



BRENTWOOD. Minutes from UCLA, luxurious 
high-rise w/deluxe appointments and breath- 
taking views. Olympic size pool and new fit- 
ness center. Apartments from $1200/month. 
Barrington Plaza 310-478-3000. 

BRENTWOOD: $1550, 2t)dnn/2bth, bakx)ny. 
refrigerator/stove, carpet/drapes, parking, 
laundry, no pets, near UCLA, by appointnDont 
11728 MayfieW. Cell:31 0-994-41 22. 310-271- 
6811. 



2BD+2BA $1395.00 

GATED GARAGE INeCOM BORY^C UNIT 

2884SAWTEiE BlVD 

(310)391-1076 

■|r(3)0)49<M109 
if.wtitiWtpli 



www. 



lects.ctB 



BRENTWOOD: 4bdrm4den. 3 full baths. Fire- 
place, hardwood floors, fully-equipped kitchen, 
kieal for sharing. Available July, lyr lease. No 
pets. $3400. 310-410-1575 



CASA OPHIR 

1BDRM/1BTH starting $1250. 2bdmT/2bth 
$2100. Luxury apartments, five minute 
walk to UCLA. Fridge, dishwasher, 
mk^rowave, laundry room, parking, bakxmy. 
NO PETS. 11088 Ophir. Eric:31 0-208- 
8881. 



8400 

Apartnients for Rent 



CULVER CITY. Large Ibdrm: $900AT>onth. 
year lease. Single: $500/month, year lease. 
Call William 310-420-7884. 

ESCAPE TO THE SEA 

Marina-del-Rey. Small fumished sailtx>at. Cool 
ocean breezes. Safe/peaceful. Marina Rest- 
rooms 150ft. away. Telephone capability. 
$450/mo. 310-358-6316. 

GUESTHOUSE 

In. t)eautiful Westwood home. Studk) w/full 
bath, kitchen, living room. Upstairs bedroom 
toft. Unfurnished. $1160/mth including all util- 
ities and premium cable. Available 06/03/02. 
Summer or lyear lease ok. Call:31 0-474- 
2708. 

LUXURY APTS 1&2bedrooms. Newly reno- 
vated. Westwood. Hardwood ftoors. crown 
nH)kJings, lots of light. Will consider pet. 
AC/new appliances. $1490-2640. 310-475- 
9311. 

MAR VISTA: 3bdrmy3bth townhome style 
apartn>ent, stove, dishwasher, A/C, heating, 
Brink Alarm, laundry-facility, two parking 
spaces. $1895/nrK>nth. Appointment-only. Ilia- 
na 310-313-0727. 




Classifieds 
825-2221 



->v^-A«.*-^. 



^^^SS^S^S: 




^m^smss 



V- 



Display 

206-30(UJ 



G1A88IHED 



MONDAY, JULY 8. 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN H 



8^00 

ApartMients for R«inl 



8AOO 

ApnrtmiMits for Ront 



8400 

Apartments for Ront 





(31 0) 208-0064, 208-4868 




• Pool, sauna, spa & rscreabon area 
'Heot^AC, refrigeraAor, micnawave. 
stOMB, cfst^asher 
> Balcony or peHo & fireptaoe 
' Studo. 1 & 2 Bac>t»ms 



UCLAi 



(310)824-7409 




(310)824-0463 



430KBikmA¥B. 

•DSL Reedy 

• RooAop spa & rBCTBalion area 

• Heat/ AC, leHi gwa l m , moo^MSve, 
skV8, cfsh¥Mnher 

• Balcony or petio & fireplaoe 

• 1 A 2 Bectooni s 



10307hmtonA¥B, 

■DSL ready 

• Fuly«^ui)8dll>W8C cenlBr 

• Rooftop surxjeck & rp croabo n area 

• Sauna, outdoor spa & barbecue 

■Heet/AC.reMgereior, 
stVB, dte^MMoher 

• Balcony bay ^Mndow. fireplaoes 
•Stu(SoAp(s.Oniy 




Call today! 



In si niinmcs from 



CMfpm Restaurants Theatres Sho 




-— Maftetplace7)f studeht-to-student deals 



utns 



Every Wednesday and Friday the Daily Bruin Classifieds provides Bruin Bargains, a 

place where students are able to advertise absolutely FREE* some of the best deals'in 

Westwood. Check weekly for updates so you don't miss out on great savings! 



I MARINA MOVE-IN 
SPECIAL 

specious n«w studios- 1 .2.3bdrms. T-l Inler- 
net. frklg*. microwave, A/C. 

pooMpe/gynVMurw, business center, con- 
cierge. Cheleeu Merina/Rjl Was. 310-827- 
3802. 

MIRACLE MILE-24-year-otd female alum 
looMng to share a beautiful, huge 2bdmV2ba 
apartment w/female grad-student. 3rd street 
between Fairfax/La Brea. Newty remodeled 
MMhen. OynV^XMl. aerobicaA^>ga. ^Mdng 
dMance to shopping. $79eATio. 323-571- 
4107. 



APARTMENT 



Get One-on-One . 
Based on: Area, Amenity, 
« of Bedrooms, Rrico, Pmt 

\ 9,000.4- ' 
* Vacancies < 

m§MH*tnt INS , Conoes, Du|NexeS( 
M e wses , 3,000« Miotes A Vivtuol 

lWrOWl*TIWrOtf 0i lS 



• raff 

• nif f 

•'•■'••• . ■ - . 

310-)7*-NOMC 301 N. RobeHson 

4663 Blvd. Beverly H»ll» 

landJordi List for Fr- 



NEAR UCLA LARQE 1B0RM in 2bdrm. Avaii- 
able now Looking for roonvneM*) $1000Ano 
or $50(Vmo/k)erson. Cel: Sharone 213-216- 
661B, Ron. '^-422-4983. 

NEAR LCLA. Spwiiah IBiSian BuiMing. Sin- 
gle: S750ATX)alh, yeer leese. Junior lbdmi: 
$82SAnonfh, yev leeae. CM Betty 310-479- 
8646. 

I PALMS $1250 

Upper, quiet 2-»-2. bakx)ny, A/C. irepleoe. sky- 
Nghi al amenities. 2-cer gated parking, leun- 
dry, bus oonnectkx) UCLA 10718 Lavvter St. 
310>3B0-59B6. 

PALMS. 2B0RM/1BTH. $1050ATKXith 9326 
NaBonal Blvd. LA 90034. Near busAfreeway. 
4-plex buiding, qutet/sunny. leundry room. 
CaM Andy 310-396-7960. 

PALMS. Single ^ from $600, 1-bdmi $700. 
$60(l/$700deposit. 1-yeer leese. Stove, re- 
Mo./:arpelB. vert, blinds. 310-837-1502 LM. 
BenvSpm. 



^ 



Westwood Village 

433 Kelton Ave. 
(310) 208-8685 

1 Bedroom from $1235 

Extra large luxury units include: 

• Fulty equipped kitchen 

• Central heating and air 

• Extra closet space 

• Wett>ar in selected units 

• Private balcony 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 



'witMyear 
ProlnMtHiy managad by 
Integrated Pro p erty Services, Inc 



J 



PRIME WEST LA LOCATION NEAR UCLA! 
2bdnn/1.SMh. Freshly peinled. new carpets, 
new oerwnic tilee in kitohen/dinning room. 1- 
$1300Anonth. 310-473-9916. 



PRIME WESTWOOD 
' LOCATION 

10777 Ashon Ave 3bdrm w/lofl. $3100 310- 
472-4951. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED from September in a 
2bdrm ^Mrtment 512 Veteran Ave $475- 
$575. Cli Mwi^er31 0-206-2665. 

SANTA MONICA PANORAMIC OCEAN- 
VIEW. Ibdmi furnished ««>ertment $2000- 
$2300. Luxury 2-1-1 bedroom, furnished $3500 
Auigried parking Walk to 3rd Street Prome- 
nedeBPier 310-3 99-3472. 

SANTA MONICA. Charming studio, cat OK. 
r/s. cerpets. large ctosets. laundry, parking. 
$680. 310-395-RENT. ¥«rww.we$ts»deren- 
tals.com 

SANTA K10NICA. Single, $895. Quiet building. 
Ctoee to market/bus. 1234 14th street, off 
WNshire. 5 miles from UCLA 310-471-7073. 



ClnssififKls 
825-2221 



SANTA MONICA. VERY LARGE 2bdnm/1bth. 
$1950 Quiet buiUing. 2-parking, private bal- 
cony. Ck>se to marketAMis. 1234 1 4th street. 
offWIahire. 310-471-7073. 



SHERMAN OAKSADJ 

$795-$8501bdrm. Garden apts. Pnme resi- 
dentiel area, ceiling fans. A/C. appliances, 
parking, heif-btock from UCLA's bus/shop- 
ping. 818-309-9610 



SPECTACULAR 

WESTWOOD 

APT!!! 

MOVE IN ASAP!!! 

NOW!!! 

LARGE 2bdnn/2bth t^ with bakx>ny Sun- 
ny, bright. Wei(-in ctoseCs. Rooftop jacuzzi 
and pool. 2 parking apeoes. W/D. stove, 
frkige i btock from^Wlshlra Center campus 
shuttle and Borders. Realy convenient tor 
students. Quiet tA cute. $2100. 1-year- 
leese. Doni miss out- Cal now!!! 31&-d39- 
2623 for more info. Or email 
wendkaOucla.edu 



* PALMS * 



2BO, 2BA TOWNHOME. FP, COORAL, AlfV 
HEAT. OATB) GAMOE. SEC. ALAMM, CAT OK 

3S14 FAMS DR. t1296./MO 

ON-SITE MQR (310)837-0906 

480. aSA ♦ LOfT TOWNMOME, FP, CENTRAL 

Aia^lEAT. OATED OAAAQE. SEC ALARM, 

CAT OK 

3e40WCSTWOOOBLVD t23aS/MO 

SiTOtMOVALEAVE. t238S/MO 



* MAR VISTA • 



aeO, 3BA TOWNHOME. FP, COfTRAL. AIR/ 
HEAT. OATH) OAfMOC. UBO ALARM, CAT OK 

12741 IMTCHai. AVB. tiaSO/MO 

2B04-2BA TOWMCMES 

11931 AVON WAY. $1245/MO. 

11748C0URTL£iGHDR. $1245/MO 

1 Z741 MfTCHBl AVE. $i 245AIIO 

1 2736 CAS«<Bi AVE. $i 245/MO. 

Open House Mon-Sat 10-4 PM 

P10) 301-1076 , 

com ■■ 



WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD 2bdrm/1bth. or 1bdrm+den. 
$1660. $1750 and $1850. Beautiful hlaidwood 
Ftoor/Caipets. Stove. Refrigerator. Rent in- 
ckides parking. Leundry Room. 310-824-2112. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD ibdmrVlbth. Beautiful hard- 
wood ftoors, carpet, parking, stove, refrigera- 
tor, laundry room. $1300 & $1400 310-624- 
2112. 



WALK TO UCLA, 
WESTWOOD 

SINGLE($1095^), U1($1350^). 

2-»-1 ($19504-). 2>2($2390 *) geled gwage. 
pool, walk-in ctoaet. leurKJry, recreatkxi 
room. )acuzzi. www.kello n towers.oom 310- 
208-1976 



WEST LA APARTMENT 

Santa Monice/Bundy. Bachkx, new carpets, 
verticel blinds, refngeratorAaundry. Bus to 
UCLA. No Pets. AvaiM)le now. $660^lO. 310- 
440-0768. 



WE/TWOOD VIUAGE 
691 LEVERING AVENUE 

V«fv kvys Qportmants for Mninadtau 

oouponcv Controllad occaai. eourtvord 

bulldtnQ tul(^ pool. 9l»^xoi. mbcsfronacyi 

porMng 8u<lt-tn Kitchens, ksr^a potios or 

bakont«s Sorrw opport w i to uuith o nrapkx* 

1 BR/1 bath $1 .300 

2BR/1 bath $1 ,800 

2BR/2bath $2,300 

For pre-applications visit us at 

www.lBVBnnghBights.com 

or call 

(310)208-3647 



WEST LA. $1500. Huge, bright front. 
3bdmV1.5 ba. Completely remodeled, dish- 
washer, patk), 2 car partdng, near UCLA. No 
pets. 310-670-5119. 

WEST LA. Ibdmns starting at $825. 2bdnns 
stwUng at $1150. And 3bdnn house $3200 
Call for details. Superlative Reality 310-391- 
1557. 

WEST LA. Spackxis single, r/s. carpets, large 
ctosets, laundry, porch, parking, $635. 310- 
395-RENT. www.west8iderentals.com 



WEST LA: 2BDRM/1 5BTH. Stove, Refrigera- 
tor, Laundry, 2 Car Parking, Quiet Neighbor- 
hood. 2 miles to UCLA $1395. 310-829-0385. 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 
No Pets 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Glenrock 



WESTWOOD 

1BDRM UPPER: Steps from UCLA, Bright, 
good ctosets, kitchen appliarx:es, laundry, out- 
door BBQ. 2-car parking. Available 09/02. 
$1300. 310-234-8278. 



Item 

4 PIECE L:COUCH_ 

BED 

BED 

BUCKRJTON 

BOOKSHQJ 

CALCUUTOR 

CHAIR W/ARMS ^ 
COMPUTER DESK 



Desciiption 



seats at least 21 



Price Phone 



$100 



310-927-7974 



matt-fbox-t-frame 



m_ 



310-745-8473 



t win, headboard obo 



.^0^ 



310-344-1530 



black mattress wood fr 



m_ 



310-209-2032 



metallic. 3 shelves obo 



ti-30x texas instr solar 



$10 310-344-1530 

$15 310-312-2465 



living o r bedrooms 



115_ 



310-288-6609 



gr eat cofKMtion 



^0_ 



310-231-0433 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Large, Clean 
Singles <fe 1 Bedrooms 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



m 



WESTWOOD APARTMENT, IbdmVlba, utili- 
ties included, pool & laundry. Nice, dean & 
quiet. July or August lease. $1100/mo, lyr 
310-208-3797. 



WESTWOOD PRIME. Ctose to Village, walk 
to UCLA. fuH kitchen, fireplece, bak»ny, laun- 
dry room each/Ttoor, rooftop heated pookja- 
cuzzi, gated garage/Intercom entry. $1650- 
$1850.310-470-1513. 



WESTWOOD SUBLET 

WITH OPTION TO LEASE. Move in ASAP 
Price-negotiable. 1 bed/1 ba. Ctose, Clean, 
Quiet. Must Seel Call for info: 310-312- 
1027. 



BRENT manor' 
APTS 

Avoid Westwood rents 
1 niile to UCLA 

Singles 

1&2 Bedrooms 

Pool, Near bus line 

No p)Ct8 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshire Blvd. 

._(510) ^77-7257 



J 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE. MIDVALE N. OF 
LEVERING. LARGE 1 AND 2BDRM APTS. 
GARDEN VIEW. DINING ROOM. UNIQUE. 
CHARM FROI^iREAR ENTRANCE. UP- 
PER, ALSO LOWER APT W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS+PATK). 310-839-6294. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE. Ibdrms $1350- 
$1550 2bdrms $1800-2250. 1-yr lease. Park- 
ing, laundry, fto pets. 310-471-7073. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE: Large IbdmVlbth 
Townhouse. $1600. Hardwood fkxjrs, fire- 
place, dining room, parking, laurjdry. lyr lease. 
Available 8/15/02. No pets. 925 Gayley. 310- 
471-7073. 

WESTWOOD. 2BDRM/2BATH $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN. STEPDOWN UVING 
ROOM. HIGH CEILING. CHARM. 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE. SOME W/BALCONY. 
310-839-6294. 

WESTWOOD. 2bdrms. r/s, hardwood ftoors, 
laundry, garage, a must seel $1450. 310-395- 
RENT. www.westsk1erentais.com 



WESTWOOD. 5min to UCLA. Spactous. 
sunny, top floor, private, 2bdrms/2 full 
baths, large walk-in ctosets. UTILITIES 
PAID, carpets. Fridge, stove, dishwasher, 
batoony, fireplace. Pets OK. 3-parking 
spots. $1790/month. 310-470-3740. 



WESTWOOD. Cozy bachetor pad, fridge, car- 
pets, mtorowave, laundry, parking. $675. 310- 
395-RENT. www.westsiderentals.com 



COUCH SET 


2 big cotjches-arav 


$100 


310-804-5678 


DESIGNER PURSES 


cute with color 


$5 


310-473-8890 


DESIGNER SHIRT 


cute small size 


$5 


310-473-8890 


DESK 


white, 3 drawer 


$80 


310-344-1530 


DESK 


wood, good quality 


$30 


310-745-8473 


DINNING SEY 


glass. 4 set 


$75 


310-749-3104 


DRESSER 


huge drawers 


$30 


310-749-3104 


ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 
GOLDEARIRNG 


m^vcrbook 
14l(hoop 


$75 

$5 
$45ea 


310-473-8890 
310-210-5471 


GOLDJEWaRY 


ring-i-pendant diamond 


310-288-6609 


IKEACART 


wheels.sheives 


$250 


310-749-3104 


KHSMTBKE 


shimano 3x7speed 


$90 


310-724-2333 


KING SIZE BED 


ikea 


$100 


310-209-2032 


LEATHER BAG 


w/MANY POCKETS 


$40 


310-210-5471 


LEATHER PANTS 


white size 11 


$15 


310-288-6609 


MAC PRINTER 


HP 


$50 


310-429-9924 


MCAT BERKLEY REV 


fuHset 


$70 


323-222-7511 


MICROWAVE 


white 


$40 


310-429-9924 


MINBiKE 


green lO-speed 


$50 


626-862-1737 


PARKING SPACE 


kelton levering 


$55 


310-208-0861 


PIONEER STEREO 


VSXD603S 


$99 


310-429-9924 


ROLLER BLADES 


Ic2size7and8 


$35 


310-312-2465 


SOFA 2 PEOPLE 


ikea blue 


$100 


310-209-2032 


STUDENT DESK 


woodw/hutch 


$60 


310-804-5678 


surrcASES 


set of 4 (4 pieces) 


$25 


310-312-2465 


TV TABLE 


(wood) in box 


$85 


310-429-9924 


TV-VCR 


13"neww/rBmote 


$120 


310-208-8156 


T¥AN BED FRAME 


mattress 


$40 


310-231-0433 


WOODEN FUTON FRAME 


full queen 


$70 


310-395-4950. 



XBOX D VD ADD-ON 
ASTRO 3TEXTB00K 



.^5. 



310-927-7974 



astronomy today 



$15 



310-210-5471 



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8400 

,Apartineiits for Rent 




WESTWOOD. Large 1bdrm, pet OK, r/s/, car- 
pets, bakx>ny, pool, laundry, parking, $1050. 
www.westsklerentals.com 310-395-RENT. 



Casablanca West 



ilitedrooms from $1195 
Bachelors $795 



HEART OF BRENTWOOD: RoonwTwte want- 
ed. Female. Sunny/ctuuming 2t>drnt/2bth 
w/batoony+front patto. Spactous IMng-room. 
fireplace, kitchen. Parking induded. $700/mth. 
310-471-9549 leave messige. 

WEST HOaVWOOD. IbdmVsfwe bath in 
2t)drm apt. Laurel Ave between Santa Montoa 
and Fountain. $665/month4or)e-nKxith securi- 
ty. Available Aug 1st. Non-snx)ker. Female 
preferred. Adorable space. 50's courtyard- 
style. 310-922-6749. 






\m^30 Vetera 
208-4394 



WESTWOOD. Studto. pet Ok. carpets, patto, 
ctose to UCLA, partdng. $700. 310-395-RENT 
www.westsklerentals.com 

WESTWOOD Walk UCLA. 2bdrm/2bth. gated 
parking, rooftop spa, quiet buikjing. accepting 
reservattons for Summer/Fall. $2075 and up. 
512 Veteran. 310-208-2655. 



8500 

aftiiieiits Furnished 



WESTWOOD. SPACIOUS 2BDRM/1.5Ba 
townhome apartment. New kitchen/carpeting. 
Plantation shutters on vwndows. Cover park- 
ing. Pets ok. lyr lease. $1845/mo. 310-441- 
1720. 




Diamond Head 
Apartmants 

Reserve Apartmertt for next sctxx>l year 

Rent starts July 1* 

SInale $1 04 5 

Sinqle w/loft it 
1 oedroom $1265-1395 

Sbedroom Ac 1 bcdroorn 

w/Toft $1755 

fibedroom w/loft $21 75 

within walking distance to UCLA. Gated 
Parkins, Jacuzzi, Sauna, Rec room. 

Laundry facllltlet, Ac/Refrlscrator, Stove. 
Short term avail. Summer discount 

660 Veteran 
208-2251 



1540 ARMACOST FEMALE ROOI^MATE to 
share spacious 2bdrm/2.5t)a condo. Fur- 
nished, washer/dryer, gated parking. $975/mo 
-fhalf Utilities. 310-457-5523. 

SANTA MONICA. Spactous tO¥vnhouse. stove, 
carpets. A/C. W/D, D/W, partdng, $1695. 310- 
395-RENT. www.we8tsklerental8.com 

WEST LA. Spactous townhouse, stove, car- 
pets. D/W. batoony, fireplace, laundry, partdng, 
$1295. 310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 
tals.com 

WESTWOOD. Spanish style townhouse, r/s, 
carpets, patio, large ctosets, W/D, garage, 
$1900. 310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 
tals.com 



WESTWOOD: Large 2bdrm/2bth. Walk to 
UCLA. 2 parking spots. Pool arxl jacuzzi. 
Starting July. $1800-$1900. 310-824-0833 

WLA/PALMS: Single for $750 (has beemed- 
ceilings), Ibdrm for $950. Close to 
UCLA/shopping. Refrigerator, stove, ctosets. 
Pool. 310-204-4332. ask for Shiriey. 

WLA:$710&up. Move-in special. Attractive sin- 
gles. Near UCLA/VA. Ideal for student. Suit- 
able for two. Definite must see! 1525 Sawtelle 
Blvd. 310-477-4832. 



8450 

Apartments to Share 



BEAUTIFUL APT 

WEST LA. $725. 3.5 miles to UCLA. Own bed- 
room w/walk-in ctoset and bathroom. Bakxjny, 
hot-tub. Secure, quiet, dean buitoing and 
parking. Share full kitchen, ample storage, 
large living/dining space, and 2 phone lines 
w/1 person. $725/month and worth it. Avail- 
able Aug 1st 2002. 310-312-8704. 



WILSHIRE CORRIDOR 

WESTWOOD. 1bdrm+ den/2bath, 10th ftoor. 
view, 24hrs security, 2 car garage. $1950/mo. 
310-475-7533, evening: 310-659-4834. 



"-^ 8700 

Condo/ HngHtWM isc for Sale 



CONDO FOR SALE 

SHERMAN OAKS. 2+2 CONDO by owner, 
spacious, many ctosets, 2-parking spaces, 
near Beverty Glen. $300,000. Move-in condl- 
tton. 8 18-789-3596. 

IMAGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Conidor/Hi- 
Rise single, 1or2bdrtn $150K-$325K. Walk to- 
UCLA/Village, 24hr/security. Spectacular 
views, pcx)l. spa, sauna, valet-servtoe. Agent- 
Bob 310-478-1835ext.109. 



WESTWOOD on Veteran. Ibdrm/lbth. 
Large private patto, hardwood fhx>rs, A/C, 
W/D in unit. $259,000. Pool. spa. and gym. 
Myron 310-454-9493. 



8700 

Condo/Townhoiise for Sale 



WESTWOOD WILSHIRE 
CORRIDOR 

Luxury Hi-Rise Condo. 17th ftoor. Sweeping 
views. 1 large master suite wAiis&her baths + 
offtoe area. Move-in condition. $669,000. 310- 
777-6371 , Jane agenL 



8800 

Guesthouse for Rent 



WESTWOOD. Charming Guesthouse, r/s, 
carpets, W/D. parking, utilities induded, 
$1500. 310-395-RENT www.westsideren- 
tals.com 



8900 

House for Rent 



BRENTWOOD. Triplex, cat OK, hardwood 
ftoors, storage, partying, $1325. 310-395- 
RENT. www.westsiderentals.com 

BRENTWOOD. Triplex, cat OK. r/s. hardwood 
ftoors, courtyard, partcing. $1200. 310-395- 
RENT. www.westsklerentals.com 

PALMS. 3bdrm/1bth charming house. 
$1950/nK>nth. Large yard, fireplace, garage, 
near blue-line. 3700 Westwood. 949-581- 
ooou. 

SANTA MONICA. Ntoe cottage, stove, hard- 
wood ftoors, laundry, parking, flex lease. 
$1150. 310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 
tals.com 

WEST LA. Spanish Duplex, r/s, carpets, patto, 
W/D hookups, partdng, $900. 310-395-RENT. 
www.westsklerentals.com 



9400 

Room for Rent 



BRENTWOOD. 2.5 MILES FROM CAMPUS. 
Lovely home. Clean room with carpet/biirKls. 
Unrestricted parking. Private room/entrar>ce, 
share bath. $550,310-472-7451. 

BRENTWOOD: Attractive, quiet home. Fur- 
nished, huge private bath. Wood ftoors. Cable, 
frklge/mtorowave. 1.5miles UCLA. Near bus. 
Available Aug 1st. 310-472-4419. 

PALMS- 1 private bedroom, shared bathroom, 
private W/D, new, never lived in townhonte, 
earty August. $875/mo. Flex lease. Larry 310- 
880-8727. 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH in beautiful home 
near UCLA; furnished, kitchen, laurxlry privi- 
'Heges, utilities, cable included. Responstole 
male student preferred. RefererKes neces- 
sary. $650/mth. 310-477-6977. Car neces- 
sary. 

ROOM FOR RENT in Beverty Hills. Private en- 
terance, full bath, refrigerator, hot plate. Dohe- 
ny and Wilshire. $675. 310-273-6639 

ROOM FOR RENT 

SANTA MONICA. Private room/ba. Female 
quiet but fun. Near 3rd street Promenade. 
Laundry security buikJing and skle-by-side 
partdng. $750/mo. Kari. 310-451-9284. 



Display 
206-3060 



r 



12 



THE OMIY BRUIN • MONDAY, JULY 8, 2002 



SPORTS 



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I 



VOLLEYBALL I Kiraly sets another AVP record 



from page H 

on June 14-16, was a three-day 
event and the third stop on the AVP 
tour. With his partner Brent Doble, 
Kiraly achieved his 143rd career 
Win by taking first place in Santa 
Barbara. 

The pair got off to a slow start, 
losing to the Brazilian team of 
Eduardo Bacil and Frederico Souza 
before coming back and sweeping 
the next two matches to capture the 
win. 

"(The victory) was special 
because it was where I grew up and 
learned to play the sport, in my own 
town of Santa Barbara with my fam- 
ily around me on Father's Day," 
Kiraly said. 

Seeded fifth, Doble and Kiraly 
upset the fourth-ranked team of 
Albert Hannemann and Bruin alum- 
nus and UCLA volunteer coach Jeff 
Nygaard. It not only reestablished 



Kiraly's dominance in the sport of 
volleyball but also the record for 
the oldest AVP event <:hampion at 
41. 

"As it happens for some and 
not others, I feel It's a rarity 
and a great blessing to earn 
your living competing in a 
sport." 

Karch Kiraly 
Volleyball player 



While volleyball commentators 
and sports journalists speculate 
about Kiraly being the greatest 
beach volleyball player of all time, 
he still denies any connection to 
that title, and instead insists on just 
playing his best in the tournaments. 



• • • 



• • • 



HAVE YOU HAD 
YOUR 10,000 SMILE 
CHECK-UP? 




f^H^in^ion, 6 X-Rays & Teeth Cl^nti^- 
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' Vorwort 
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• Root Canals 

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• OPtN LATE HOURS 

• CtMC«(S & CradH Card* ara Wetcoma 

• Fr*a Validatad Parlcing 

• 23 Yaars in prtvat* practic* in W w i wood 



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1762 Westwood Blvd. «460 (between Wilshire & Santa Monica Bl.) 

onthemarkecheerful.com http://www.1 800onthemark.com 

For Appointment Call: (310) 474-3765 



"I loved my time at UCLA. I had a 
great time, playing with the other 
masters of volleyball," Kiraly said. 
"1 really eiyoyed the hundreds of 
hours 1 spent with all the other 
Bruins on the team." 

Within the Michelob Light 
Tournament itself, other alumni hke 
Nygaard also demonstrated their 
athleticism. 

Kevin Wong, who currently holds 
the top-seeded position in the AVP 
tour, looks up to volleyball icons 
like Kiraly and Siryin Smith with 
admiration for their achievements 
in the sport 

"1 think they have such unique 
and extreme characteristics and are 
both such great competitors," 
Wong, another former Bruin, said in 
an AVP interview. That, and they 
both went to UCLA and have always 
been supportive of us fellow 
Bruins." 

Wong finished fifth in the 
Michelob Light Tournament with 
another ex-Bruin, partner Stein 
Metzger. 

Kiraly, Wong, and Metzger com- 
peted again in Belmar, N J., on June 
30, but all lost in the semifinal 
round. Four UCLA alumni - Holly 
McPeak, Elaine Youngs, Annett 
Davis and Jennifer Johnson-Jordan 
- competed in the women's doubles 
final, won by McPeak and Youngs. 

Despite the loss, Kiraly continues 
to disregard the high expectations 
that follow him. He acknowledges 
his gift and embraces the opportuni- 
ty to play professionally. 

"As it happens for some and not 
for others, I feel it's a rarity and a 
great blessing to earn your living 
competing in a sport," Kiraly said. 

With reports from J. P. Hoomstra, 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff 




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SPORTS 



YOUNESI 



MONDAY, JULY 8. 2002 ■ THE DAILY BRUIN 



IS 



from page H 



SPL a starting ground for many NBA players 

league in the worid and reportedly 



ed in John by his father. Jack 
Younesi, who passed away last 
October. 

Jack Younesi, a self-described 
product of World War II, expatriat- 
ed fh)m his native Iran to New York 
mone than 50 years ago. Possessing 
a strong hold of the English lan- 
guage proved an invaluable 
attribute in helping Younesi assimi- 
late into the new culture and attain 
a degree in eco- 
nomics. 

"The business 
acumen, street 
smarts, diversity 
and anything I 
else I possess, I 
acquired from 
my dad," John 
Younesi said. 
"But people that 
you love never 
completely leave 
you, and the part 
that stays with 
you shares in life 
as you bve it." 

Younesi always harbored strong 
oratory and persuasion skills, and 
he had always maintained an inter- 
est in law. He pursued his studies 
and attended Loyola Law School in 
Los Angeles, eventually completing 
his academic career as a top stu- 
dent in his class and garnering a 
post in the law firm of John 
Anderson, the namesake of the 
Anderson School of Business at 
UCLA. 

A career as a litigator that has 
now spanned 18 years, was brushed 
by the hand of fate in 1992 when 
Younesi met Larry Creger, a former 
college basketball coach who need- 
ed representation in a lawsuit. 
Creger owned the SPL, which has 
been around since 1970. 

Younesi helped Creger stake a 
$60,000 settlement and eventually 
bou^t the league from Creger in 
1993 for $80,000. The SPL, with 
Younesi at the helm, has blossomed 
into the most prominent type of 



WATER POLO I 

Holiday Cup 
victory is 
U.S. team's 
third straight 

from page H 



we can. 

The victory marked the third 
straight year that the United States 
has won the Holiday Cup, the 
largest annual water polo tourna- 
ment In the nation. 

Beauregard, and UCLA team- 
mates Amber Stachowsld and 
Thalia Munro, each saw significant 
action in the championship game, 
with each of them in the lineup at 
the same time at one point in the 
third quarter The trio of Bruins felt 
more comfortable having each 
other as teammates again, albeit at 
the international level 

*I know in warm-ups it was real- 
ly nice to look across the pool at 
Robin," said Mumt), a sophomore. 
"It made me calm." 

The squad opened the tourna- 
ment with a 2-2 tie against Canada 
on July 4th before wh4>ping Brazil 
the following night 14-2. Needing a 
victory to advance to the champi- 
onship game, the Americans scored 
three times in the first quarter and 
cruised past Japan 6-3. 

The Japanese team is really 
quick,* said Muiux>. "They drive a 
lot and set a lot of picks so we had 
to change our defense a little bit 
and not be as aggressive as we nor- 
mally would." 

An Honorable Mention All- 
American at UCLA last season, 
Muiux) scored the Americans' final 
goal against Japan in the fourth 
quarter when she beat Japanese 
goalkeeper Akiko Inagaki with a 
hard shot that found the comer of 
the net 

"We had been practicing the 
counterattack a lot because that is 
a big part of our offense," Murux) 
said. 

Many of the collegians on the 
team have learned to adapt to the 
brutali^ of the international game. 
"International water polo is a lot 
more physical and a lot faster," said 
Beauregard, a veteran of interna- 
tional competition. "Elveiyone out 
here has been playing for a long 
time and Ls the best in their country 
at the sport. There are no weak 
links on any team." 

Although the purpose of this 
tournament was mostly preparation 
for upcoming tournaments in 
Australia and Italy, it was signifi- 
cant for the Americans to win on | 
their home soil over July 4th week- 
end. 

"Every tmie I look up at the flag 
with the national anthem playing it 
is a special moment," said Munro. 
"(Representing your country) is 
something that most people don't 
get to du" 



a seven-figure investment. 

What makes the league appeal- 
ing to so many fans is the accessi- 
bility and prices. 

"We appreciate basketball in its 
purest form, and though it's a busi- 
ness, we didn't want to develop it m 
a way to bar the fans to ei\ioy the 
experience," Younesi said. "For $10 
a day, you can make a whole day 
out of it, watch five games, sit next 
to Jerry West, Mark Cuban or 

Danny 
Ainge." 

The SPL 
has served as 
a foundation 
for many 
players and 
has also pro- 
vided 



"We appreciate basketball in 
its purest form and though 
it's a business, we didn't 
want to develop it in a way to 
bar the fans to enjoy the 
experience." 

John Younesi 
President of Dada SPL 



former Bruin Baron Davis. 

The NBA hasn't been exactly 
conducive to the SPL's longevity. A 
deal that Younesi had brokered 
with UPN to televise SPL games 
was nixed by NBA comniissioner 
David Stem, who feared that fea- 
turing NBA stars in television in 
the sununer would hinder the pro- 
gression of the WNBA, which runs 
in the summer The NBA also helps 
back other summer leagues in 
Utah and Boston, which provide 
competition for the SPL. ' 

Despite these and myriad other 
setbacks, the league subsists on 
revenue generated from league 
sponsors, such as footwear and 



grow. 

The SPL season began with try- 
outs on June 30th. 

"Players can show their mental 
capacity and athleticism, and 
maybe earn a chance to play," 
Jerry Clark, an SPL advisor and 
scout said. 

Games began Sunday and will 
run through July 21. Eight NBA 
clubs are fielding teams in the 
league this year, while countless 
other NBA players, including 
Penny Hardaway and Earl Watson, 
will play for teams formed by their 
agents. Several of this year's top 
rookies, including Drew Gooden, 
Kareem Rush, Amare Stoudemire, 



clothier Dada, who outfits most of Caron Butler and Mike Dunleavy 



EISENBERG 

from page 14 

Friday nights could really help the Bears prepare for upcoming road games. 

No wonder the team often appeared a step slow in assembling a sterling 7- 
21 road record over that ^an. 

The university has decided to appeal the punishment, claiming that a one- 
year postseason ban and the loss of nine scholarships over the next five sea- 
sons was too stringent 

Here's hoping the NCAA does not back down. In the seedy world of 
Division I college football, if you are dumb enough to get caught, you deserve 
whatever punishment you get 

Seeking a fi^sh start this season, the Bears seem to have made an intelli- 
gent decision at last, hiring Jeff Tedford as their new head coach. The former 
University of Oregon offensive coordinator is widely re^)ected as a solid 
coach and a top-notch recruiter, but he is taking over a program that has 
reached rock-bottom. 

Massive changes must be made before the program can climb toward 
respectability again. 



form for play- 
ers, league 
directors and 
referees to 
hone their 
respective 
skills in hopes of advancing their 
careers. 

The league is divided into 24 
teams, including 12 agent teams 
and 4 teams comprised of players 
selected in the tryouts. Creger, 
who still serves as executive direc 
tor of the league, sees the tryout 
process as a good forum for play- 
ers to display their skills and pos- 
sibly gamer lucrative contracts 
from teanis overseas. It also serves 
as a reality check for others. 

"We not only do a great service 
for the players that do make it, but 
also the ones that don't," Creger 
said. "Some of these guys realize 
that the competition is higher than 
they would have expected, and 
after this league, they go out into 
the real world and realize that they 
might have to go a different direc- 
tion." 

Younesi believes that about 800 
NBA players have played their first 
professional basketball game in 
the SPL, including the likes of 
Kobe Bryant, Magic Johnson and 



the teams. 

While the league previously 
a plat- journeyed between such venues as 
Cal State L.A. and Dominguez 
Hills, Loyola Marymount, and oth- 
ers, it seems to have found a home 
on the Long Beach State campus at 
the Pyramid Sports Complex. 

"It's not a huge multi-million 
dollar venture, but it's going to 
develop further," Younesi said. "I 
have always wanted sports to be a 
part of my life, and this will hope- 
fully be something that I can help 



Jr are also expected to participate. 

One of the early highlights of the 
season was Sunday's matchup 
between the Lakers and Memphis 
Grizzlies. 

"For the first time ever, Jerry 
West, who has been associated 
with the Lakers for over 43 years, 
is on the other side," Younesi said. 
"And in this league is the first time 
that it happened." 

Tickets for the SPL are available 
through Ticketmaster 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND STAFF 
VISION CARE INFORMATION 

The offices of Dr. Jon D. Vogel Opromerrisr or Village Eyes 

Opromerry, hove welcomed fcculfy, sfoff end students fronn 

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day. We will nnake every effort ro see you promprly when 

you conne in for your app>oinmnenf. Call 310 208-001 1 to 

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satisfied patients. Ask around: nnony of your fellow faculty 

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graduate of UCLA and o life mennber of the alumni 

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DAILY BRUIN 




Page 14 



Shmmkr Weekly Edition ■ Monday, Ji'ly 8, 2002 



www.dailybruin uclaedu 



Nuveman in race for ESPY award 



By J.P. Hoomstra 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
jhoornstra@media.ucla.edu 

It's not the Academy Awards. Not even the 
Grammys. But in its 10 years of existence, 
the ESPY awards have found their niche in 
our culture. 

With trophies honoring the best athletes in 
all nuyor sports, along with kitschy cate- 
gpriea like 'Outstanding Performance by aii 
Athlete in Entertainment" (won by Charles 
Barkley in 1994 for his one-on-one hoops 
demolition of Barney on "Saturday Ni^t 
Live'O, the ESPYs have entered the n\ain- 
stream consciousness as an unofficial, yet 
significant, barometer of sports greatness. 

In addition to tackling categories that no 
awards show has tackled before ("Best 
Bowler," "Best Sports Movie," "Best 
Outdoors Athlete"), the choices of Best Male 
land Female Athlete carry longer-lasting 
natior\al influence. 

I Hitting closer to home is the race for Best 
Female College Athlete. UCLA's Stacey 
INuveman has a chance to bring home only 
the second ESPY in school history, the first 
Isince Ekl O'Baimon was chosen Outstanding 



College Basketball Performer of the Year in 
1996. 

"It's pretty amazing (to be nominated)," 
the All-American catcher said. "It's quite 
unbelievable." 

These aren't words of false modesty. ThLs 
is the first year that the women's award has 
been open to non-basketball players, and 
three were nominated. 

Along with Nuveman, Arizona pitcher/first 
baseman Jennie Finch, Cal swimmer Natalie 
Coughlin, hoopsters Sue Bird of Connecticut 
and Jackie Stiles of SW Missouri State are up 
for the award. 

Who is the favorite? 

"It's between Sue Bird and Jackie Stiles." 
Nuveman said. "Because of the high profile 
of women's basketball, and looking at the 
panel (who selects the winner), (I think) 
they probably don't follow college softball. 
Their sport is much more in the media." 

Bird helped Connecticut to what may have 
been the best season in NCAA women's bas- 
ketball history. The Huskies went 39-0 and 
defeated Oklahoma 82 70 in the national tide 
game, with Bird hitting six ft-ee throws in the 
final 61 seconds. However, she was only the 
third-leading scorer on a balanced team. 




The 10th Annual ESPY Awards 
Wednesday July 10, 6 p.m. 
Kodak Theatre, Hollywood 

Stiles is the favorite after setting two mon- 
umental NCAA records during her senior 
year in 2001 with most career points scored 
(3,39J) and most points in a season (1062). 
She led the nation in points per game each of 
her last two years. 

Coughlin is the dark horse candidate to 
win. Based on credentials alone, she wins 
the award hands-down. She set American 
records at the 2002 NCAA championships in 
four different events: the 100-meter back- 
stroke. 200-meter backstroke, 100-meter 
fi^eestyle and 100-meter butterfly Her sport, 
however, is one of the least noticeable in the 
NCAA. 

Finch pitched and played first base for the 
Wildcats for each of the last four years. As a 
pitcher, she set the career record for most 
consecutive wins (60) and compiled a career 
119-16 record. In 2002, she went 34-6 with a 
0.97 ERA. 

Nuveman, meanwhile, spent the last four 



^Ur Jtl^Miu. 



years at UCLA establishing herself as the 
Babe Ruth of softbaU. She owns the NCAA 
records for most career home runs (90) and 
highest career slugging percentage (.945). 

Last season, Nuveman was chosen USA 
Collegiate Player of the Year by the Amateur 
SoftbaU Association after hittiiig .529 with 20 
home runs and slugging an NCAA-record 
1.045. Defensively, the catcher threw out five 
of a mere 1 1 potential base stealers. 

Nuveman and Finch spent last weekend in 
the same dugout in Honolulu, representing 
the United States in the inaugural U.S. Cup. 
National teams from Australia, Canada, 
China and Japan trekked to Hawaii for the 
four-day tournament; the U.S. team won 
Sunday's final 1-0 over Japan. Both players 
will fly back in time to attend the ESPYs. 

While Nuveman wouldn't miss the show 
for the world, she won't be writing an accep- 
tance speech on the plane ride back. "I don't 
expect to win. If it somehow works out, I'll 
come up with something spur of the 
moment," she said. 

Like the Oscars, Wednesday night's event 
will be held at the Kodak Theatre in 
HoUywood and air live nationally at 6 p.m. 
on ESPN. 




P^ 




mssBSMimjaBm 



SUE BIRD, UCOHH, BASKETBALL 

.^'CrKI2 statistics 

("-TOTAL--i |--5-PTS—t |-flEBOUNOS-| 

GP-GS Min-Avg FG-FGA Pct5FG-fGA Pet FT-FTA Pet OffDefTot Avg PFFO A TOBIkStl Pts As/g 
39-39 1188 2a9 198-392 .505 69-148 .466 98-104 .942 25106 131 3.4 43 231 93 9 96 563 14.4 
• Winner of 2002 Honda Avvardfor best NCAA women's basketbafl player 

Sourre wwwjKoantHMMM.ctMn 



NAT/MJE COUGHLIN, CAL. SWIMMING 

American records 
lOOnneter butterfly 
100-meter backstroke 
200-meter backstroke 
100-meter freestyle 

Sourcv: The EMty CiUtlanuan 




50.01 seconds 
49.97 
1:4a52 
47.47 







EDWARD LIN/Daily Brun Senior Staff 

Stacey Nuveman has a chance to become the second Bruin to win an ESPY since 
Ed CBannon won Outstanding College Basketball Performer of the Vtear in 1996. 



mm STILES, SW missoiii?i state, basketball 

2000-01 statistics , 

|—TOTAL--i i- 3-PTS--1 h-REBOLM)S -| 

GP-GS MJN-AVG FG-FGA PCT FG-FGA PCTFT-RA PCTOFF-OEF TOT-AVG PF-FO A TO BLK ST PTS-AVG 
35 361169 53.4 365645.56655 132 .492 267 301.887 27 94 121 5.5 85 5 68 96 4 401062-30^1 
• AMme leadhg scorer in NCAA women's basketball history 




Cal football 
' fa^eskmg 

road to 
respectability 

So the Cal football team is ineligible 
for postseason play this year. So 
What 

After amassing a sparkling 1S40 
record over the past five seasons, 
including last year's 1-10 masterpiece, 
the Bears are just hoping to escape the 
Pac-10 cellar in 2002. Even before the 
NCAA placed the program on five years 
of probation last week, Cal had about 
as much chance to qualify for a bowl 
game as Freddie Prinze Jr has to 
receive an Oscar nomination for 
Scooby Doo. 

In feet, the Bears have been so 
dreadful lately that it makes you won- 
do- if they are clear on the whole "cheat 
to win" concept 

Other notorious 
cheaters have rid- 
den a wave of 
overzealous boostr 
ers and illegal shoe 
contracts to the top 
of the college foot- 
ball worid Five 
years of academic 
fi^ud and recruiting 
violations has left 
Cal with a team 
that should struggle 
to notch a confer- 
ence victory in 

2002. ~ 

The Bears went 0-8 in the Pac-10 last 
season including a forgettable 56-17 
drubbing at the hands of our then- 
unbeaten Bruins at the Rose Bowl last 
October. Cal has not beaten its rival 
Stanford since 1994. 

It has gotten so pathetic in Berkeley 
that if not for a face-saving victory 
against Rutgers in the last week of the 
season last year, the Bears would have 
gone 0-1 1 for the first time in school 
history. 

Fve heard that cheaters never pros- 
per but this is ridiculous. 

Maybe the university should have 
hired former men's basketball head 
coach Todd Bozeman as a football con- 
sultant At least when Bozeman paid off 
high-profile recruits in the mid-1990s, 
the squad was a fixture in the NCAA 
tournament 

One thing is certain though: The pro- 
gram's cheating tactics leave a lot to be 
desired 

Michael Ainsworth and Ronnie 
Davenport, the two Cal wide receivers 
who enrolled retroactively in ^ring 
semester classes in August of 1999, and 
received passing grades despite not 
doing any of the work, left the school 
shortly afterwards. 

And the 38 members of the team 
who received what the NCAA 
Committee on Infi'actions deemed "inci- 
dental hotel expenses" fi-om 1997-2001. 
The NCAA did not specify what that 
means, but Fm sure that watching late 
night pom or raiding the mini-bar on 

EI8ENBERQ | Page 13 



JefT 
Eisenberg 

jBBerterB@me(la.uclBLadu 



Women's water polo team leads U.S. to win 



SQUAD INCLUDES UCLA 

TEAMMATES BEAUREGARD, 

STACHOWSKI, MUNRO 

By Jeff Eisenberg 

DAILY BRUIN STAFF WRITER 
jeisenberg@media.ucla.edu 

PALO ALTO — Less than two months ago. 



the UCLA women's water polo team put up a 
spirited fight before falling to Stanford in the 
NCAA Championship game. 

Sunday evening, members of both squads 
teamed with the best female players in the 
nation to lead the United States to an 8-6 victory 
over Canada in the fmal of the 2002 Holiday Cup 
Women's International Water Polo Tournament. 

The Americans outplayed the physical 
Canadians in front of the net and never trailed in 
the game. Coralie Smunons tallied four goals in 



the finals, while tournament MVP Brenda Villa 
had three, including the game winner, a deft 
shot fi-om about eight meters in front of the net. 
"We came out fired up," said UCLA senior 
Robin Beauregard, who had four shots and two 
assists on the night. "The last couple times we 
played Canada we came out a little tentative. 
We've been battling them ever since I can 
remember. Anytime we play them it's a good 
opportunity for us to learn from them the best 



WATER POLO I Page 13 




Former Bruin t 
heads Summer Pro-League 

SPORTS LOVER, LAWYER JOHN YOUNESI TAKES ON 
BASKETBALL, APPRECIATES IT AT 'PUREST FORM' 




ji)ti 



t.i,iv>.\n;' ^iN/Daily Brun Senior Staff 

m Younesi oversees Dada Summer Pro League contests. 



By Mayar Zokaei 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
m20kaei@media.ucla.edu 

More than two decades ago, John D. 
Younesi was a walk-on senior on the UCLA 
baseball team with m^or league aspirations. 

Today, he really is in a league of his own. 
Just not exactly the way he envisioned it. 

Instead of donning a baseball uniform and 
passing the summer away on a baseball field, 
Younesi, who is a lawyer, finds hinuself toil- 
ing the hot months away as president and 
CEO of the Dada Sunmier Pro League, a 
summertime version of the NBA. 

"I have always loved sports, and when I 
was able to get involved as owner in this 
league, 1 was eager to do it," said Younesi, 
who celebrates his 10th year as owner of tlie 



SPL 

Younesi grew up in Queens, N.Y., and 
always expre.ssed a strong interest in sports. 
His penchant for atliletics reached its pinna- 
de while Younesi was at IICLA, where a 
fielding mishap on the baseball diamond 
iH'ariy destroyed his nose and prompted 
reconstructive siu-gery, which helped but left 
Younesi with respiratory problems that stiU 
persist. 

"My nose looked like it had absorbed a 
(Mike) TVson left hook," Younesi explained. 
"To tJiis day, I can't breatlie properly through 
It. 

; If any notion of giving up his studies had 
entered his mind, it was quickly pushed 
away by Uie mettle and persistence institut- 



Y^UMESI I Page 13 



Karch Kiraly goes for a return during the finals of the Santa Barbara Open. 

UCLA alumnus continues to 
dominate beach volleyball 



By Regina Yeh 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
ryeh@media.ucla.edu 

Three-time Olympic gold medal- 
ist and UCLA alumnus Karch Kiraly, 
who has barely paused throughout 
his prolific professional volleyball 
career, took a moment to stand 
back after setting another record on 



the Association of Volleyball 
Professionals (AVP) tour. 

"1 was really happy with the way 
it went and how I played," Kiraly 
said. "It was a really special victory, 
mine and Brent's (Doble) first 
together." 

The Michelob Light Open, played 

YOLLEYBAU | Page 12 



THE UNIVERSITY OFCALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES i ^ 

DAI LY BRUIN 



Servmg the I'CLA cmnmunity since 1919 



fc 



ONDAY, JiTLY 15, 2002 



Activists protest poiice brutaiity 



MARCHERS DEMAND 
■ ACTION BY CITY, ASK 
DISTRICT AnORNEY FOR 
VIDEO TAPER'S SAFETY 

By Andrew Edwards 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
aed ward s(§)media. ucla.edu 

INGLEWOOD - Emotions and tempera- 
tures ran high July 12 and July 14 as com- 
munity activists, civic leaders, local resi- 
dents, and a handful of UCLA students 
protested an alleged case of police brutality 
in Ingle wood. 

The events were in response to a July 6 
incident at a gas station on the comer of 
Century and Freeman Boulevards. 
Inglewood pohce officer Jeremy Morse was 
caught on videotape punching 16-year-old 
Donovan Jackson in the face, after the teen 
was slammed against a police car while 
handcuffed. 

Morse's attorney, John Bamett, said that 
Morse's actions demonstrated "restraint," 
claiming Jackson had grabbed Morse's testi- 
cles before being hit. Morse is on paid leave 
until local, state and federal nusconduct 
investigations are completed. 

The event on July 12 at the Inglewood 
Civic Center featured several speakers, 
including comedian and activist Dick 
Gregory and Martin Luther King III. Their 
speeches were followed by a brief unity 
march on City Hall. 

On Sunday, July 14 state Assembly 
Speaker Herb Wesson Jr.. D-Culver City, 
^oke during services at the First African 
Methodist Episcopalian Church in south 
central Los Angeles. He was flanked by LA. 
City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo and 
Assemblyman James Horton, D-Inglewood, 
among others. 

I The July 12 protest began shortly after 10 
am. with both the crowds and speakers 
braving an already hot sun. Speeches were 
frequently punctuated by audience chants. 

Protesters repeated "no justice, no 
peace!" several times. 
I UCLA students were among those pre- 




EDWARD LIN/Dml^ luv. is ^h:^; k m.v.k 

Martin Luther King III (center) speaks at the Inglewood rally against police brutality. "We are stand- 
ing up ... because our conscience tells us to," he said. 



James Hicks, center, protests 

the beating of 16-year-old 

Donovan Jackson. 

sent. 

"I just came to offer sup- 
port," said Andy Ramirez, 
third-year Chicano/a studies 
and American hterature and 
culture student. 

"Police brutality is an 
everyday thing in our neigh- 
borhood and they're finally 
catching it on tape again," he 
added. 

Gregory asserted the beat- 
ing of Jackson fit a pattern of 
poUce misconduct. 

This is a racist institution, understand 
that," said Gregory. "Police brutality affects 
black people in this country the same way 
the sun affects white people." 




EDWARD LIN/Dmu Bki in Senior Staff 

King stated the protest was against abus- 
es of pohce power, not the pohce them- 
selves. 

"We are not against poUce officers; we 



are against pohce brutality, misconduct and 
racial profihng," he said. 

Gregory encouraged those present to 
become involved in further activism, regard- 
less of risks. 

"Maybe we have to go to jail. Maybe we 
have to put chains around the pohce depart- 
ment. We have to change something," he 
said. 

He concluded with a surprise announce- 
ment. 

"I will fast until this thing is settled," he 
declared. 

King insisted the issue was not about 
race, but morahty. 

"This is a 'right and wrong' matter," King 
said. 

Civil rights attorney Leo TVrell demanded 
civic leaders take personal responsibiUty. 

"(Inglewood's) pohce chief should resign 
today," he said. 

Inglewood police chief Ronald Banks 
said he will wait for the results of current 
investigations before taking any action. 

He also had a message for L,A. District 
Attorney Steve Cooley, demanding safety 
for Mitchell Crooks, who caught the July 6 
incident on video. 

The District Attorney's office maintains 
Crook's incarceration has nothing to do 
with the controversy. 

"He's in jail because he's a fugitive," said 
Jane Robison, spokeswoman for the District 
Attorney. 

Crooks did not serve a prison term in 
Placer County for driving under the influ- 
ence, hit and run, and petty theft convic- 
tions. 

Some speakers expressed hardline com- 
ments. 

"Right now there is 100 percent dissatis- 
faction. Right now the city of Inglewood and 
Los Angeles could be on the brink of anoth- 
er civil insurrection," said Tony Mohammad, 
spokesman for the Nation of Islam. 

Several speakers equated pohce brutahty 
with terrorist acts. 

The marchers were greeted with honks of 
approval from motorists along La Brea 
Avenue. 

On Sunday, during the 10 am. service at 

INGLEWOOD I Page 4 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



AFSCME 
organizes, 
sets laws, 
guidelines 



By Brian Sullivan 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
bsullivan@media.ucla.edu 

The largest union representing 
UCLA en^)loyees is attempting to 
revive itself after struggling through 
nearly two decades of disorganiza- 
tion and stagnation. 

On July 9, Local 3299 - the 
University of California chapter of 
the American Federation of State, 
County and Municipal Employees - 
ratified its first constitution by a 92-8 
percent margin. 

AFSCME represents many of 
UCLAs custodians, medical house- 
keepers, bus drivers and other per- 
sonnel who support daily can^us 
operations. Currently, the union is 
working with the UC Office of the 
President in an atten^)t to unionize 
about 100 non-student ASUCLA 
workers presently hired throu^ a 
"ten^)" agency. 

The constitution includes guide- 
lines establishing terms of office for 
union representatives and expanding 
the executive board, enabling the 
union to provide representation on 
aD UC campuses. Currwitly, seven of 
the nine campuses, including UCLA, 
have a representative. 

"We had no constitution before," 
said Margaret Koiyevod, a UCLA psy- 
chiatric technician and AFSCME 
member. "TTiere was nothing. People 
who came to work at UCLA didnt 
even know that they had a union." 

However, some members still feel 
that the union is out of touch. 

UNION I Page 2 



Breakin 



By Pejjean Tsai 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
ptsai@media.ucla.edu 

If the Valley secedes, there could be big 
changes for both the proposed city as well as 
for remaining areas of Los Angeles, including 
UCLA. 

In November Los Angeles residents will 
decide whether or not to spht up the nation's 
second largest city. 

Advocates for Valley secession have placed 
the proposal on the November ballot in hopes 
of achieving their own community with tighter 
i control of city services and local government, 
but this could cost the new and remaining 
cities a lot. 

Though UCLA is not located in the San 
Fernando Valley, all Los Angeles residents, 
including those around UCLA will be hit with 
higher utihty costs, said Juhe Wong, a spokes- 
woman for Mayor James Hahn. 

If the Valley secedes, an additional fran- 
chise fee by the Department of Water and 
Power would be incurred by the newly-sepa- 
rated city. Since DWP could not legally charge 
Valley residents different rates than those for 
non-Valley residents, the extra franchise fee 
costs would be divided among all Los Angeles 




UC can't finalize budget 
due to Assembly delay 



and Valley 
residents, 
raising utihty 
costs for all, 
said Wong. 

Whether the 
new Valley 
city's council 
decides to keep 
rent control in some 
areas of the Valley 
could also affect students 
who hve in off-campus resi 
dences. The new council 
could decide not to enact rent 
control, resulting in high rents for 
students hving in the Valley, said 
state Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa 
Monica). 

"With very few exceptions, I don't see any 
of the people who have expressed an interest 
in running for the new city council in the 
Valley supporting rent control," said Kuehl. 

Valley secession could also result in a msgor 



Jasdn Lh/Daily Briin 

decrease in tax revenue for the 
I rest of Los Angeles, said Wong. 

Cuirently the Valley collects more tax rev- 

8ECE88I0N | Page 2 



By Noah Grand 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 
ngrand@media.ucla.edu 

California is entering its third 
week of the new fiscal year without 
a budget, as legislators debate over 
how to deal with a $23.6 biUion bud- 
get shortfall. 

Current indications show that the 
University of California will have to 
endure some budget cuts, although 
core programs will be left largely 
intact 

Additionally, the Senate recently 
passed a budget plan that would 
fund many outreach programs that 
were cut in Gov Gray Davis' May 
budget 



The UC Board of Regents had 
planned to finalize the budget at its 
July 18 meeting in San Francisco, 
but cannot do so until the state bud- 
get is passed and they know how 
much money they have to work 
with. 

"It's unlikely that the UC regents 
will have a budget to discuss by 
Thursday," said Steve Mavigho, a 
spokesman for the governor. 

On June 29, the state Senate 
approved the budget, which includ- 
ed tax increases, cuts to many state 
programs and borrowing money. 

But this budget was five votes 
short of £^proval in the state 

REGENTS I Page 3 



Islamic militants convicted 
for kidnap-slaying of Pearl 




Construction bothers some in Westv^ood 



ANlilK LfcVlNfc/DAiLV Bki IS 

Workers clean out and cement-line water pipes. 



By Chris Montalvo 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
cmontalvo@media.ucla.edu 

A recent Department of 

Water and Power construction 
project has been an unavoidable 
obstacle for many Westwood 
residents, but the scene of pipes 
and holes on the street will soon 
end. 

The "Cement Lining FVoject" 
is 95 percent finished, said DWP 
Project Engmeer Ah Sabouni, 
and construction will be done in 
two or three weeks. The pur- 
pose of the project is to reno- 
vate the water pipeline system 
and improve the quahty of tap 
water in Westwood, according 
to the DWP 

While they may eiyoy the out- 
come, many residents aren't too 
happy with the process of the 
construction. 

"Parking is even worse now 



because they are taking up half 
the street," said Evan Ben-Artzi 
a fifth-year history student, who 
fives in a Landfair Avenue 
house. 

The construction has been 
inconvenient not only because 
of lack of parking but also 
because of the bumps left on the 
streets as a result, Ben-Artzi 
said. Other students have com- 
plained about the noise the con- 
struction produces. 

"It is incredibly loud so I can't 
talk on the phone," said third- 
year psychobiology student 
David Pearl, who also hves in a 
Westwood complex. 

According to the DWP, the 
end of the project will bring 
many benefits for Westwood 
residents. 



says. 

In addition Westwood's water 
pipes will last for at least fifty 
more years and residents will 
see new water meters and fire 
hydrants. 

Main water pipes were 
installed in Westwood in the 
1930s. Since then, corrosive 
material has built up inside of 
them, causing pipes six inches 
in diameter to be reduced to 
about three to four inches, 
Sabouni said. 

The project began its process 
with the installation of tempo- 
rary water pipes - which are 
currently visible near apartment 
sidewalks - used while the main 
line is being upgraded. 
^^ This allows workers to cut 
( tJ>e main pipes and apply a layer 



Residents will see better \of cement mortar, "inserted into 
wat^r color, and liave improved tile pipeline and pulled through 
firefigliting capabihties because / 
of better water flow, the DWP CONSTRUCTION | Page 3 



Sheikh sentenced to 

death; Saqib, Fahad 

receive 25 years in 

prison for their crime 

By KATHY GANNON 
The Associated Press 

HYDERABAD, Pakistan — A 
Pakistani judge on Monday convict- 
ed four Islamic mihtants in the kid- 
nap-slaying of The Wall Street 
Journal correspondent Daniel Pearl 
and sentenced one of them to death. 
The others received 25 years impris- 
onment. 

Lawyers for the chief defendant, 
British-bom Ahmed Omar Saeed 
Sheikh, and the three others said 
they would appeal. Saeed was sen- 
tenced to hang for his role in the 
Jan. 23 abduction of Pearl, 38, the 
South Asia correspondent for the 
newspaper. 

Reporters were barred fi^m the 
courtroom inside the heavily guard- 
ed jail here when Judge Ah Ashraf 
Shah rendered the verdict. Deputy 
defense lawyer Mohsin Imam 
informed journalists of the decision 



against Sheikh, Salman Saqib, Fahad 
Naseem and Shaikh Adil. 

Pearl disappeared in Karachi 
while researching Pakistani's 
Islamic extremist movement, includ- 
ing possible hnks to Richard C. Reid, 
who was arrested in December on a 
flight between Paris and Miami with 
explosives in his shoes. A videotape 
sent in February to U.S. diplomats 
confirmed Pearl was dead. 

Security was heavy at the 
Hyderabad jail as the verdict was 
announced. Sharpshooters maimed 
robftx^p positions across the streets 
and pohce sealed off the street in 
fi'ont of the walled compound. 

The trial has fanned the anger of 
Islamic mihtants against Pakistan's 
government, which many extremists 
feel betrayed them by abandoning 
the Afghan Tahban and supporting 
the United States after Sept 11. 

"The government will impose the 
decision at the behest of the United 
States," said Sheikh Aslam, Adil's 
brother, as he arrived to hear the 
verdict. "All executive decisions in 
Pakistan are being imposed by the 
United States." 

Before the verdict, defense 

HEALTH I Page 4 



lum^y 



Weather rr 5 ^0^ ^0^ 



Thynd^y 



Contact 



310825-2795 
news^media . ucla.edu 



VIEiPOWTDESK 

310-8252216 
v»ewpoint@media.ucla.edu 



AAEOESK 

510-8252538 
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SPORTS DESK 

310825 2095 
sports@media.ucla.edu 



AOVEimSINQ UNE 

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B«BCl9itirti 
Fridm, Ji^ 'MM 



Index 



Classified 9 

Crossword. . . 11 
Letters 6 



Viewpoint. 
A&£ .... 
Sports . . 



. 6 Movie Times . . 8 
. .7 Checl( us out at: 
16 dailyt)ruin.ucla.edu 



I 



I 



I 



niE DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY, JULY 15, 2002 



DAILY BRUIN 






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Westwood to have public meeting 



By Robert Salonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@medla.ucla.edu 

Residents have the rare chance 
to voice their concerns and ideas 
about Westwood with city, local and 
university representatives at a com- 
munity-wide meeting this week. 



The first-ever public meeting of 
the North Village Improvement 
Committee is scheduled to include 
attendance by Katherine 

Kuykendall of Mayor James Hahn's 
office, and Councilman Jack Weiss, 
who represents the fifth city district 
which includes UCLA. 

NVIC, led by director Shelley 



Taylor, aims to create a sense of 
conununity in the iiniversity adja- 
cent neighborhood areas. Its most 
prominent issues include parking 
congestion, trash on local streets 
and graffiti on Westwood walls. 
"We're trying to give the neigh- 

YILUQE|Page3 



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UNION 

from page 1 

"We d(Mit know who is on the bar- 
gaining committee, we don't know 
the president," said Charles 
Hardaway, an Environmental 
Services eniployee at the UCLA med- 
ical center. 

Hardaway and others are also 
skeptical of the latest efiforts towards 
reform and organization. 

But union officials believe they are 
growing stronger and are encourag- 
ing participation. 

"We want to open up the union and 
breathe the breath of reform," said 
Craig Merrilees, director of Local 
3299. 

But the confidence of some union 
members is slow in coming. The day 
after the election, complaints were 
made that the ratification vote had 
been inconveniently scheduled and 
prevented many ftx)m participating. 

The campus polling ate located at 
Schoenberg Hall was originally 



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scheduled to be open fi:-om 3 p.m. to 5 
p.m., but the limited hours would fail 
to accommodate all work shjits. 

Many members were not able to 
get to work early because their conv- 
mute takes too long, according to 
Maxine Harris, a UCLA custodian and 
union member. 

"Some people have to leave home 
at 2:30 to get to a 5:30 shift," said 
Harris. 

Recognizing the scheduling prob- 
lem, vote organizers decided later 
that day to keep the Schoenberg poll 
open until 8 p.m. in order to accom- 
modate those on the later shift. 

Though union leaders tried to 
make the vote as accommodating as 
possible, they were unable to secure 
a m^yority of voters. Onfy 24 percent 
of the 9,()00 union members voted. 

But the new constitution seems to 
be emblematic of the union's efforts 
to break firom the past 

University employees formed 
Local 3299 under the AFSCME union 
in the early 1980s after a decade of 
fighting with the UC over the ri^t to 
unionize. 




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For more Summer Sessions mformation. visit 
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But because so much energy had 
been spent in negotiation, union offi- 
cials say the final contract favored 
management. As a result, for years 
the union's presence was weak and 
many union members felt neglected 

"Back in the '80s through the late 
'90s, the union did not make dramatic 
progress, and so it was forced make 
concessions to management," 
Merrilees said 

Tlierefore many union members 
have felt the union was doing litde or 
actually taking advantage of them. 
Some members remain skeptical of 
AFSCME and distrust these efiforts at 
reorganization. 

"It's hke the blind leading the 
blind," said Hardaway. 

Though feelings of discontent per- 
sist, most union members feel the 
constitution is a sign of positive 
things to come, as reflected in the 
large siq)port for its ratification. 

"Never heard too much about the 
union (before the vote). Now we are 
more informed Tliere is a union," 
said Jose Salgado, a UCLA bus driver. 



SECESSION 

from page 1 

enue than the rest of Los Angeles, 
so remaining areas will lose a lot of 
funding for city services, said 
Wong. 

This loss could indirectly affect 
UCLA because the campus relies 
on city services regularly, said J. 
Eugene Grigsby, the director of the 
Advanced Policy Institute of UCLA 
and a professor of urban planning. 
For example, while UCLA has its 
own police department, UCLA 
often uses the services of the Los 
Angeles Pohce Department. 

Services in the Valley, however, 
could improve if the Valley were to 
secede and form its own local gov- 
ernment, said Shirley Svomy, a 
professor of economics at Cal 
State Northridge and Valley resi- 
dent. 

Currently services in the Valley 
aie inefficient because Los 
Angeles has become too large, she 
said. 

A separate, snudler Valley city 
would insure a more efficient 
economy where residents are bet- 
ter served, she said. 

Secession would also benefit 
Valley residents by allowing for 
closer government representation 
which would better represent the 
needs of the Valley, Svomy said. 

"If the people of an area want to 
organize their own government 
and see advantages in doing it, 
they should be able to. We have 
enough civic involvement (in the 
Valley) that we could run our own 
government," she said. 

While possibly benefitting from 
secession, Valley residents would 
have to fund the necessary alimo- 
ny payments required by state law, 
which could be costly, said Wong. 
According to state law, seces- 
sion must be "revenue neutral.** 
Secession could not financially 
hurt the remaining Los Angeles, or 
else the new city would need to 
pay alimony. 

The amount of the alimony 
would be $128 million a year for 
the new Valley city over twenty 
years, according to the proposal by 
the Valley Commission. An inde- 
pendent consultant hired by the 
city, however, calculated that 
alimony could be as high as $288 
miUion a year, said Wong. 

Funding alimony might require 
higher sales tax for those in the 
Valley, said Kuehl. 

A decline in city services may 
also occur to balance higher fees, 
leaving Valley residents with fewer 
library services, public park access 
and city-wide after school pro- 
grams, said Wong. 

Valley residents will therefore 
end up having poorer services and 
higher fees, said Grigsby. 

If Los Angeles were to break 
into smaller communities, the 
Valley should not be the area to 
secede, believes Tim Young, a 
fourth-year communications stu- 
dent and a Valley resident 

"The Valley is a pretty well-off 
area and is self-sufficient," said 
Young. 

Less affluent areas might be 
more deserving of the benefits of 
tighter government control, he 
believes. 

While secession has its positive 
side, voters will have to decide 
whether increased fees and costs 
for both Valley and non- Valley resi- 
dents is worth the extra benefits. 

For Grigsby, the idea of better 
government is not enough to con- 
vince him that secession is a good 
idea. 

"If you don't like the govern- 
ment servicing you, you vote the 
officials out of office. You don't go 
create your own city," said Grigsby. 



i 



tl 



^"ifiir'irri*i' ■-•'■ji - 



I ^^!fif 55St^3W^ 



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VILLAGE 

from page S 

borhood a chance to network," 
"ftiylor said. 

UCLA is also getting involved 
witJi the three-year-old committee, 
lookmg to increase its communi- 
cation with the area west of cam- 
pul 

"T^ere are a lot of mutual 
efforts we can join in," said Diana 

H 1- 



REGENTS I UC 

likely to accept 
budget without 
many changes 

from page 1 

Assembly the next day. 

Currently, Democrats are tiying 
to get four assembly Republicans to 
vote for the budget as it is, while 
Republicans are fighting agamst the 
prof>08ed tax increases. 

If there is no state budget by the 
July meeting, the regents will defer 
approval of the UCs 2002-2003 bud- 
get until September, when their next 
meeting is scheduled. 

If the Assembly makes substan- 
tial changes to the Senate's version 
<rf the budget, however, the regents 
will likely call a special meeting in 
August to vote on the changes. 

A delay would not have any 
adverse effects cmi university opera- 
tions, said UC spokesman Paul 
Schwartz. 

"It doesnt hold us up," Schwartz 
said. 

The assembly will probably 
accqpi the Senate's decision on UC 
(imding without m^or changes, he 
added 

Some Democrats say Republicans 
are voting against the budget for 
political gain in a year when Davis is 
running for re-election. 

"Beauise of poUtical interest the 
Republicans aren't voting for it," 
Maviglio said "They want to create 
chaos to show mismanagement* 

Assembly Republicans say they 
will not vote for a budget that raises 
taxes. TTie Senate's budget included 
$3.6 billion of tax increases. 

Fighting against tax increases 'is 
about basic, fundamental 

Republican principles" said 
AsseiiibJ>nia/i Johii Cajriphrll. R 
Irvine, vire-ohair of the a.ssembly 

The GOP also wants to reduce the 
amount of borrowing in the budget 
and place spending limits on future 
budgets. 

Though Democrats have a nugor- 
ity in the Assembly, they need four 
Republican votes because state bud- 
gets must be approved by a two- 
thirds nuyority in both houses 
before they go to the governor's 
desk. 

Democrats £aced a similar prob- 
lem last year, but were able to get 
Republicans to cross party lines by 
offering tax breaks for farmers and 
rural communities. 

But it is much more difficult to 
offer incentives for individual mem- 
bers this year because there is less 
money to go around. 

Regardless, Maviglio said, Davis 
is trying to get individual 
RepubUcans to vote for the budget 
instead of trying to reach a consen- 
sus with GOP leadership. 

**nie leadership is a lost cause," 
Mavi^o said 

Republican leaders feel different- 
ly, saying Davis should try to reach a 
consensus with them before speak- 
ing only to individual members. 

With reports from Robert Salonga, 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff, and The 
Associated Press 



Brueggemann, executive director 
of local government and communi 
ty relations for UCLA. 

Brueggemann's office recently 
helped to coordinate an effort 
between NVIC and UCLA fraterni- 
ties to apply for a neighborhcKxi 
matching fund grant. 

Under the grant, the city of Los 
Angel€»s would give the group up 
to $5,000 to purchase trash bins to 
be "strategically" placed through- 
out Westwood. NVIC would have 
to match the amount by dollar 



+ 



NEWS 



MONDAY. JULY 15. 2002 - THE WILY BRUIN 3 



amount or through manpower at 
$10 per person per hour. 

Taylor said she has gotten the 
fraternities to "more than meet" 
the requirements. 

Hahn is also looking to get 
involved with the Westwood com- 
mittee. Kuykendall, the West Los 
Angeles area director for the 
mayor's office, hopes to listen to 
community concerns and offer 
city services to help. | 

Brueggemann strongly encour- 
aged l^CLA students to participate 



in the conunittee meeting. 

"They're neighbors too," she 
said. "It's a mixed neighborhood, 
and to improve things, working 
together is the way to go." 



OONSTRUOTION 



The NVIC meeting will be held at 
the University Catholic Center on 
Wednesday, July 17 at 7 p.m. 
Those who wish to attend must 
RSVP by Tuesday by calling (310) 
208-8007 or sending an e-mail to 
iTtfo@youmorthvillage. org. 



r 



from page 1 

at a constant rate so that the lining is 
smooth and even," according to a 
DWP hand-out. 

To end the project, a DWP inspec- 
tor examines the uniformity and 
smoothness of the cement mortar 
£^pUed. 

jThe construction will leave some 
lasting effects, however. 

Gayley, Strathmore and Landfair 



avenues are the streets most damaged 
by construction, but they are not 
scheduled to undergo resurfacing any 
time soon, according to the City of 
Los Angeles Bureau of Street 
Services. 



7b report any problem with the cur- 
rent construction in Westwood or for 
further questions call the on-sight 
engineer at (310) 481-3953. 




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lawyer Rai Bashir claimed the pros- 
ecution had offered "no substantive 
evidence" against his clients and 
said he expected an acquittal 
"unless the verdict is influenced by 
the government of Pakistan and the 
government of the United States of 
America" 

With fears of a backlash, police 
used steel barri- 
cades Monday to' 
seal off both 
ends of the 
street in front of 
the jail. 

Truckloads of 
armed police, 
army soldiers 
and black-uni- 
formed paramili- 
tary commandos 
patrolled out- 
side the walled 
jail compound. 

Sharpshooters in steel helmets 
stood guard on the roof of the hotel 
across the street, and police in a 
sandbagged bunker coidd be seen 
on the jail roof. 

Western diplomats and some 
Pakistani observers fear the kidnap- 
slaying of the 38-year-old journalist 
was the first shot in a war between 
Islamic extremists and this coun- 
try's Western-backed government. 

Pakistani newspapers Saturday 



On the highway between 
Karachi and Hyderabad, 
graffiti painted in black let- 
tering on concrete barriers 
proclaimed: "America, your 
death is coming," and "The 
war will continue until 
America is finished." 




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AntimoN Au ucu Siuknis^ Faculty A Staff! 

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This original coupon ad in the Daily Bruin together with a valid UCLA 
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July 22 at 1 lam. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER SESSIONS. This 
coupon ad must be exchanged at the Tournament Box Office only on 
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I I 



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This original coupon ad in the Daily Bruin together with a valid UCLA 
student, faculty or staff ID entitles the holder to one (1) FREE best 
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coupon is valid for EVENING SESSION only, Monday July 22. NOT 
VALID FOR ANY OTHER SESSIONS. This coupon ad must be 
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received an Urdu-language e-mail 
purportedly from Asif Ramzi, one of 
those sought in the Pearl case, 
threatening more attacks against 
foreigners. 

Soon after the kidnapping, e- 
mails received by Pakistani and 
Western news organizations from 
the previously unknown National 

Movement for 
the Restoration 
of Pakistani 
Sovereignty 
showed Pearl in 
captivity and 
demanded better 
treatment for 
Taliban and al- 
Qaida prisoners 
at the U.S. naval 
base in 

Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba. 
The first e- 
m^ called Pearl a CIA agent; a sec- 
ond claimed he was working for the 
Israeli intelligence service, the 
Mossad. Pearl's family denied both 
allegations. 

Saeed and his co-defendants 
denied involvement in the kidnap- 
ping and accused the government of 
fabricating the case to appease 
American anger Saeed admitted a 
role the kidnapping during his ini- 
tial court appearance Feb. 14 but 
later recanted. 

Saeed was believed to have links 
with some of the country's most vio- 
lent Islamic extremist groi4)s. The 
trial began April 22 in Karachi but 
was moved to Hyderabad, about 
110 miles away, after prosecutors 
said they were receiving death 
threats. 

On the highway between Karachi 
and Hyderabad, graffiti painted in 
black lettering on concrete barriers 
proclaimed: "America, your death is 
coming," and The war will contin- 
ue until America is finished." 

Prosecutors alleged that Saeed, a 
former student at the London 
School of Ekx>nomics, lured Pearl to 
a Karachi restaurant with the 
promise of a meeting with an 
Islamic cleric, who has been 
cleared of any involvement in the 
kidnapping. 

The prosecution relied heavily on 
technical evidence provided by the 
FBI, which traced the e-mails to co- 
defendant Fahad Naseem, who in 
turn identified Saeed and the oth- 
ers. Naseem said Saeed told him 
that he intended to grab someone 
who was "anti-Islam and a Jew," 
police reported. 

The key prosecution witness, 
taxi driver Nasir Abbas, testified he 
saw Pearl get into a car with Saeed 
in front of a Karachi restaurant on 
the night the reporter vanished. The 
defense claimed Abbas was pres- 
sured into his statement. 

The United States has asked for 
Saeed's extradition to face U.S. 
charges in the Pearl case and in the 
1994 kidnapping in India of an 



INGLEWOOD I 

Mayor calls 

for cameras 
in police cars 

from page 1 

First AME Church, Wesson con- 
demned the beating and offered 
support for Inglewood Mayor 
Roosevelt Dom in an impassioned 
statement. 

"Mayor Dom, I've got your back 
homes, I've got your back," said 
Wesson. 

Dom, who has called for the fir- 
ing of Morse and the installation of 
video cameras in Inglewood police 
cars, is also a minister at First 
AME Church. 

Wesson described the beating of 
Jackson as a wake-up call and 
annoimced he would create a new 
committee concerned with poUce 
brutality. 

"No more will we have to turn 
on our television and see our chil- 
dren beaten," he said. 

In his sermon. Reverend Cecil 
Murray said 95 percent of police 
officers' reputations are damaged 
by the acts of the other 5 percent. 

These 5 percent are among 
those who are "hellbent on doing 
wrong," he said. 

The controversy has attracted 
attention outside of California. 
Rev. Al Sharpton has met with the 
Jackson family and called for 
national legislation to establish 
local police review boards and 
higher penalties for police miscon- 
duct. 

With reports from The Associated 
Press 



Make sure to check out 
the Daily Bruin online at 
iwww.clailybruin.ucla.edu. 
'Scientists end study on 
hormone replacenfient 



% 



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6 THE DAILY BMIIN - MONDAY. JULY 15. 2002 



VIEWPOINT 



EMAIL"^=*-MAIL 



T?ie Daly Bruin 
tlSKerdthofTHal 
306 Wtetwood Pla2a 
Los Ar«B«es.CA 90024-1641 



Wte reserve ttie rgh( to edit letters for length 
and dahly Mxj must ndude your name, maing 
address and telephone number. AnofMnous 
letters wl be accepted but not pubisned 



^itMMHW ' Utensils, bhairs key to successful living 



Editorial Board 

CtALHTEMOt' Ortbga, Editor in Chief 

Corey McEleney, Managing Editor 

Cody Cass. Viewpoint Editor 

Kelly Raybirn. Neus Editor 

Edward Chiao, Staff Representative 

Amy Frye. Stajf Rej ■ - ' e 

Derek Lazzari), StaJS r . itwe 

Robert Salonoa, StajJ Representative 

Amanda Sohapel. $t<\(f Representative 



Reform needed to 
end police brutality 

The ire raised by the beating of IG-yearold Donovan 
Jackson by officers from the Inglewood Police 
Deptitxnent cwi July 6 is another turn in a cycle of 
intermittent awareness of pobce brutality. 

TTie Jackson case is reminiscent of the Los Angeles 
Pohce Department's beating of Rodney King in 1991, 
which sparked a wave of riots and civil unrest 
National, state and local authorities assured LA resi- 
dents reform would take place. But now Angelaios are 
reminded once again of the reality of police brutality 
and the need for more reform. 

Some feel this was an isolated incident involving 
one bad officer. But to propoae the rare incidents 
caught on tape are the extent of police brutality is dan- 
gerous. It is the undocumented and unpunished 
episod e s which pose the greatest threat to the pubhc 
becMise there is no ensuing prosecution of the offend- 
ers, who can repeat their crimes if undeterred. 

Tliose who cannot handle the complex responsibili- 
ties of Isw enforcement should be removed firom the 
qyslem, as Inglewood Mayor Roosevelt Dom suggest- 
ed. The offending police officers should not only lose 
their jobs, they should also be prosecuted criminally 
and dvilly just as anyone else would Still, this wont 
be enough to stop outers frtxn oxnmitting similar 
uhiies in the friture, since these measures were also 
used against the officers who beat King ten years ago. 
Local police departments need more rigorous training 
in exercising restraint and commuruty sensitivity, espe- 
aally if the crime turns out to be radially motivated. 

Unless police officers understand the community 
they are assigned to, similar clashes will happoi in the 
ftiture and poUce will continue to lose the pi^bc^ 
trust T^e potice should not need policing of their own. 



▼" as 



ast week I suddenly found myself 
^eating breakfast cereal with a plas- 
tic fork. Not even a spork. but a 
fork. If you've never tried eating cereal 
with a fork, you 
should consider 
yourself lucky. I was 
counting myself 
unlucky while sitting 
in a chair a foot too 
low for our dining 
table, rendering me 
about eye level with 
my bowl. And fork. 

About this time, I 
started wondering 
when my room- 
mates and I would 

finally invest in a 

complete silverware set (by "complete" 
I mean one that has spoons). Sure we 
had remembered to bring all the essen- 
tials, like posters, yoga mats and lava 
lamps, but some non-plastic utensils 
sure would have been nice (because 
despite what they say, it's even harder 
to eat cereal with a lava lamp than with 
a fork. Yeah. My logic is astounding 
huh?) 




Bonnie Chau 

b(tieu(iniedauciB.8du 



Having been in my new apartment 

for almost a month now, I feel the need 

to share some Potentially Helpful Stuff: 

Things I would have liked to have 
brought: non-plastic utensils, vacuum, 
broom, mop and toaster. 

Things I'm really glad my roommates 
and I brought (or bought within the 
first two days): toilet pa^er, paper tow- 
els, bowls, plates, cups, a stereo sys- 
tem, phone, microwave, water purifier, 
pots, pans, chairs, dishwashing liquid, 
lamps, toilet plunger, bathroom rugs, 
alarm clock, bed, tacks, scissors, alco- 
hol, tape, hammer and nails, screwdriv- 
er and wrench. 

With the PHS out of the way, I feel 
the need to share some more interest- 
ing stuff: 

Make sure you know about your 
building's party policy. We threw a 
small housewarming party the weekend 
after we moved in. Our landlord then 
claimed we had 70-90 people present 
and threatened to terminate our lease. 

Just because you see a piece of fur- 
niture without obvious sex stains on it 
thrown out on the sidewalk, it doesn't 
necessarily mean it's perfect for your 



apartment. We dragged up a red velvet 
couch from Levering Heights and it 
ended up not fitting through our door- 
way. 

If you have a boy subletting with you 
for the summer - half the parents 
would throw their daughters into a 
convent if only they knew - establish 
an excuse for his omnipresence when 
you first move in (like he's yourl-oom- 
mate's boyfriend) and make sure he's 
not the one recording the answering 
machine greeting. 

Check the door locks when you first 
move in to see which ones lock from 
the inside or outside so nobody gets 
locked out on a fourth floor balcony 
and has to find some way down, wear- 
ing Big Bird-feet-shaped flip flops. 

Having a television is really not nec- 
essary. We have a gigantic 13-inch set, 
on which we can only watch ABC - and 
sometimes that's even slightly fuzzy - 
but it plays movies fine with a VCR. 
There is always more amusing drama 
to watch in real life anyway. 

In other news, our fireplace mysteri- 
ously stopped working after the party 
and our dishwasher exploded and 



spewed foaming bubbles into our 
Idtchen sometime last week. We're 
already using our second microwave, 
stuff drips every time we have the air 
conditioning on for an extended length 
of time, and we've had a scary toilet 
experience with one bathroom. In addi- 
tion, we've had an only-buming-hot-or- 
freezing-cold shower experience (fol- 
lowed by a broken plastic hot-and-cold 
knob). 

Not only do our dining table chairs 
match neither the table nor each other, 
but two of them are only about two 
feet tall. We still don't loiow how to use 
the intercom to buzz people up. We 
have three phones and two dueling 
answering machines. Apparently they 
are each set to answer calls after a dif- 
ferent number of rings but both pick up 
at the same time and it's pretty much 
mass confusion. As of this moment 
(remember, it's been about a month 
since I've moved in) two of five people 
in the apartment have beds. And our 
smoke alarm goes off every time we 
use the oven. 

Nonetheless, or maybe all the more, 
apartment life kicks ass, sea bass. 



ASUCLA workers are donors too Secession of Valley, 



Unsigned editorials represem a majority opinkxi of the Da4y 
Bruin Edrtonai Board. AN o<her columns, letters and artwork 
represent the opirions of their authors. 



LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 

An influx of responses to the July 8 editorial 
"UC must respect human rights, divest," indicates 
a significant number of readers have conflised the 
difference between news coverage and editorials. 
There is also misunderstanding as to the nature of 
the Daily Bruin's relation to the university. 

An editorial represents the position a newspa* 
per takes on an issue and is meant as just one per- 
^)ective the public can use in developing its own 
viewpoint on current events. lY\e opinion of the 
editorial board does not carry over to our news 
coverage; we report our news as fairly as possible. 
Independent of editorial positions. 

Tlie Bruin is not a mouthpiece for the university 
or any entity therein. A number of readers have 
threatened to withdraw donations to the universi- 
ty, not permit their children to attend UCLA, and 
to return their degrees to Murphy Hall in protest 
because of opinions recently e3q)ressed by the edi- 
torial board. Readers should realize the university 
and the Bruin are independent - the views 
expressed in editorials belong to the editorial 
board, not the university. As such, the editorial 
board's views will not change because readers 
threaten to pit the university against it 

Last week's editorial - which called for the 
University of California's divestment firam busi- 
nesses in Israel - should not be misinterpreted as 
an endorsement of violence against Israel The edi- 
torial stated the board did not support violence by 
either ^de in the conflict. It said the board would 
su{^)ort divestment if a Palestinian state serving as 
a host to both UC investments and human rights 
violations existed. 



Qy Albert Boime 

Hel-lo! Does anyone recall the 
motto oi our fair institution, fiat 
lux? Are we in the business of 
optimizing and sharing our 
metaphorical light of wisdom or 
do we prefer the business of the 
bottom line? 

Not so long ago, we finally 
granted the teaching assistants 
collective bargaining rights and 
classification as full-time employ- 
ees. In this case, one could justify 
the strife on the grounds of a par- 
adigm shift fix>m traditionally 
treating TAs as apprentices to 
their new status as regular 
employees - an evolution prompt- 
ed by the recognition that sudden 
chariges in the economy could 
deprive them of the benefits 
seemingly etched in stone. 

The possibility that we are in it 
for the bottom line is about to be 
realized as the current fiscal 
woes, coupled with the vast loss- 
es incurred by the corrupt prac- 
tices of Enron, WorldCom and 
other Wall Street messes, are 
going to lead to all sorts of cre- 
ative mtbacks. 

But it is one thing to find 
strategies for dealing with hard 
times, and another to behave like 
Wal-Mart What could possibly be 
the excuse for treating non-stu- 
dent workers employed by the 
Associated Students of UCLA as 
second-class citizens? On the one 
hand, we gladly accept a $200 mil- 
Uon donation for the medical 
school to develop our noble goals 
of lifesaving benefits. But then 
behave like corporate predators 
when it comes to our low-wage 
workers on campus. 

It may come as a surprise to 
the canipus community that 
UCLA has been depending upon 
giant employment services like 
Adecco, Spherion and smaller 
outfits like Star Staffing Services 
of Beveriy Hills to provide a pool 
of temps for clerical positions, 
concessions and food services. 
According to spoke^)ersons of 
Adecco and Spherion, they typi- 



cally charge a 34 to 39 percent 
weekly markup on the wages of 
each employee they provide. Star 
Staffing Services, provider of the 
non-student workers, has been 
charging somewhat less at 
approximately 32 to 33 percent 

This system, widely practiced 
by corporations, is known as out- 
sourcing the subcontracting of 
labor in order to override local 
regulations, unionizing demands 
and benefits. The non-student 
workers provided by Star Staffing 
Services start at less than our stu- 
dent employees and receive no 
benefits. 

A fiill-time non-student employ- 
ee earning the minimum winds up 
with an annual income of $14,040, 
less than half of what constitutes 
a "living wage." The Economic 
Policy Institute set it at $30,000 a 
year for a family of one adult and 
two children. This means UCLA 
has been paying a "poverty wage" 
to approximately 75-80 full-time 
and part-time employees. Is this 
policy consistent with our motto? 

An employee of the ASUCLA 
restaurants praised the labor of 
the non-student workers, observ- 
. ing they work the long hours and 
perform the hard labor students 
cannot do at our numerous con- 
cession events. Hence, they are as 
vital to the functioning of the uni- 
versity as any other member of 
the administration, faculty and 
staff, and deserve the same kind 
of re^)ect and job security the 
rest of us eiyoy. 

UCLA should be a preferred 
employer not for a privileged few 
but for every member of its work 
force. Tb even devote one sector 
of our campus to a low-wage 
workplace is not only to maintain 
the national state of gross eco- 
nomic inequality but also to go 
against the experience of 1996- 
1997, when the last minimum 
wage increase actually helped 
fuel the high growth of the period 

It is good news to learn 
ASUCLAs board of directors is at 
last doing the right thing by rec- 
ognizing the rights of non-student 



workers to a union contract with 
the Association of Federal, State, 
County and Municipal Employees, 
the service workers union at the 
University of California - and 
benefits. They have also recom- 
mended to the Office of the 
President a recognition agree- 
ment which carries the right to 
bargaiiL 

The UCLA students who fought 
for this recognition deserve credit 
for bringing the issue into the 
open and pressuring the board of 
directors to take the steps neces- 
sary to assume full responsibility 
for the working conditions and 
treatment of non-student employ- 
ees. Hopefully, the proposed 
change will be authorized by UC 
President Richard Atkinson 
before summer's end. As much as 
the Geffens, the Reagans and the 
Broads, these nameless donors 
also contribute through their 
labor to making this institution of 
higher learning a place of light for 
the local and global community. 

What the university stands for 
should go beyond the issues of 
wages and poverty, serving as a 
role model for an enlightened 
society and advancing the means 
to eliminate economic inequality. 
We should not forget U.S. 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's 
statement when he sent his Fair 
Labor Standards biU to Congress 
in 1937. America should be able 
to give working men and women 
"a fair day's pay for a fair day's 
work." By depriving non-student 
workers of a living wage, the 
workers in effect have been subsi- 
dizing the administration, faculty 
and staff who ei\joy the fruits of 
their unpaid labor. 

As the university strives to 
compete effectively in the market- 
place of higher education, let us 
not dim the light in confounding 
the institution with a corporate 
entity but let the light radiate to 
all parts of the world as a beacon 
of wisdom and social justice. 

Boime is an art history professor 
at UCLA. 



1 



LETTERS 



Politics should not 
Influence UG portfolio 

Your July 8 editorial, *UC must 
respect human rights, divest," was so 
childish I am surprised you published 
it Maybe you were so desperate for 
something anti-Israel, you went with it 
But where is the mtelligence? 

Your editorial says "the University 
of California has no business associat- 
ing itself with either side of the con- 
flict in any way." Then the editorial 
board sUps off of its soapbox and 
writes, "When the university invests in 
Israeli corporations, the profits, in 
turn, are taxed by the Israeli govern- 
ment and help support the occupation 
of the West Bank, as well as other mili- 
taristic ventures." So on the one hand 
you don't want the UC to take sides 
and should therefore divest firom 
Israeli corporations. But on the other 
hand, you advocate the UC take 
actions that will curb "the occupation 
... (and) other militaristic ventures." 

You can't have it both ways. Either 
you advocate the UC take a strong, 
anti-Israel poUcy and therefore divest 
its investments or you advocate the 
UC divest its investment decisions 
&"om political concerns. 

As a Bruin alumnus, I strongly advo- 
cate a separation of investments fi'om 
politics. Just as I would disagree with 
investments in any country's economy 
in order to support it, I would disagree 
with divestments from Israel for politi- 
cal considerations. I do not believe 



the UC has any business measuring or 
regulating its internal decisions by 
external political concerns not under- 
mining U.S. foreign policy. 

lb let a rebellious, leftist fascist nm 
around the Daily Bruin offices, spout- 
ing off anti-I.srael diatribes is irrespon- 
sible of the paper and should get the 
UC's attention more than the matter of 
divestment 

Mtti/Uan 
GlMion963 

There's no ambiguity: 
divestment misguided 

As much as I love my alma mater 
for the great four years I spent as an 
undergraduate there, I am appalled the 
Daily Bruin could be so misinformed 
as to the situation happening in the 
Middle East The July 8 editorial, "UC 
must respect human rights, divest," 
claims "there should be no ambiguity" 
about the situation in the Middle East 
I agree. There should be no ambiguity: 
Israel handed over almost the entire 
Gaza Strip and over 90 percent of the 
West Bank to the Palestinian Authority 
during the Oslo peace process. 

There should be no ambiguity about 
former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud 
Barak offering the Palestinians their 
own state comprised of nearly all of 
the territories in question (including 
parts of Jerusalem). Tiiere should be 
no ambiguity about Arafat walking 
away frx>m this generous offer There 
should be no ambiguity that, despite 



pledges to the coniraiy, Arafat and his 
Authority never revoked the use of 
violence as a means of achieving polit- 
ical ends. There should be no ambigui- 
ty that terrorist attacks, which target 
5^year-old babies, medical volunteers 
and every other civilian, occur almost 
daily against Israelis and are support- 
ed by a m^yority of the Palestinian 
population. I 

There should be no ambiguity that 
Israel acts only in its own defense by 
targeting the murderers before they 
can strike, while at the same time 
attempting to limit iimocent 
Palestiiuan casualties. There should be 
no ambiguity that the UC should sup- 
port Israel's right-to-exist and support 
their defense of democracy (as they 
are the only democracy in the entire 
region). There should be no ambiguity 
that the drive for divestment is mis- 
guided at best, malicious at worst and 
that all reasonable members of the fac- 
ulty and of the student body should 
oppose it. 

Joshua Atlas 
Class of 2001 

Divestment no longer 
efTicient tool 

I read with interest the editorial on 
July 8 about divestment in Israel ("UC 
must respect human rights, divest"). 
Since Jewish immigration began in 
1880 into the land now called Israel, 
many Jews believed the proverb, "With 
peace comes pro^)erity." Globalization 
has taught us the proverb is indeed 



wise, and we now know the more peo- 
ple we do business with, the wealthier 
we become. 

Divestment, which threatens wealth, 
therefore, has proven to be a formida- 
ble weapon, as in South Africa in the 
1980s. TTie threat of divestment has 
motivated wealthy Israelis in the past, 
so they pushed their government to 
negotiate a peace with Egypt, Jordan 
and Lebanon. The resulting peace 
brought wealth and a feeling of safety. 

Now the weapon of divestment is 
again being pointed. Just as divest- 
ment helped bring peace in the past, 
logic tells us that it should bring about 
peace now. But unfortunately things 
have changed. The bombings by mar- 
tyrs since the breakdown in the Arafat- 
Barak negotiations two years ago has 
led many to believe negotiations do 
not bring safety. 

Without a feeling of safety, wealthy 
Israelis will not pressure the govern- 
ment to negotiate. For divestment to 
work, Israelis would have to believe in 
safety like the good old days. In their 
present psychological condition, 
divestment will scare Israelis even 
more. Divestment will bring about feel- 
ings of isolation, misunderstanding 
and fear. Using divestment may wound 
Israel, but it will not bring about the 
needed feeling of safety. Therefore, the 
weapon of divestment will not have 
the desired effect I hope the thought- 
ful minds of UCLA can come up with 
an idea that promotes safety and not 
alienation. 

Stephen Sllberman 
Los Angeles 



Hollywood would 

create rather than 

solve problems 

By Jack Weiss 

In November, Angelenos will cast a historic vote 
deciding whether to split Los Angeles along its seams 
by creating new cities out of the San Fernando Valley 
and Hollywood. I oppose breaking up the city for one 
simple reason - Los Angeles is stronger together than 
the new cities would be on their own. 

While I respect and understand the frustrations 
making the idea of secession appealing to some resi- 
dents, I believe in all areas of Los Angeles, from 
Northridge to San Pedro, firom Westwood to Sunland 
to Tiyunga, our communities are stronger together 
and can be better served by a united city. 

No matter where people hve in Los Angeles, they 
probably travel to other parts of the city to work and 
to pl^. The Lasers and the Dodgers don't belong to 
just parts of Los Angeles. Their victories and frustra- 
tions are shared by all of us, on both sides of 
Mulhoiland Drive. 

Likewise the Getty Center, t^e Hollywood Bowl and 
UCLA are visited by people from all over the city. 
Sharing these institutions makes all of our lives bet- 
ter. 

With our shared joys, city residents also share chal- 
lenges. In my district, which spans the hillsides to 
include portions of the Westside and the Valley, I see 
the same concerns facing everyone. People are con- 
cerned about improving public safety, reducing traffic 
and protecting the environment. Despite these issues, 
they believe Los Angeles is a good place to live. 

My staff and I work very hard on both sides of the 
hill to respond to concerns affecting the quality of life 
in our neighborhoods. When there is a problem, I am 
able to respond directly. For example, a hate crime 
assault against several young people recently 
occurred in Beverlywood, and as the councilmember 
for the area I was able to secure additional police 
patrols for the neighborhood. 

If parts of the city secede, essential services such 
as police and fire would be provided to new cities 
through contracts with Los Angeles. Residents would 
become customers of the same departments and ser- 
vices rather than constituents with the ability to influ- 
ence the city via the political process. Many question 
how this arrangement could possibly be better than 
keeping the city together. 

Currently each city councilmember represents 
about 250,000 people. Some say this is too many peo- 
ple for one district. If the concern is the size of coun- 
cil districts, we could address it by increasing the size 
of the city council to create smaller districts without 
breaking up Los Angeles. 

A fractured Los Angeles will create new layers of 
bureaucracy in new cities, doubling the number of 
politicians and adding new costs. For example, a new 
city in the San Fernando Valley would be required to 
pay tens of millions of dollars in "valimony" to Los 
Angeles every year. These payments would leave less 
revenue available for services in the new city. 

The new cities would either have to raise taxes or 
cut services to balance their budgets. How will the 
new cities choose between streets, parks or traffic 
officers? 

Additionally, Los Angeles has the stability of long- 
held ordinances such as rent control and anti-discrim- 
ination. In new cities, the laws of the Los Angeles 
would apply for a transitional period, but then the 
new city governments would have to pass all their 
own laws. Will rent control and civil rights be a priori- 
ty for the new cities? Voters may not want to risk 
these hard fought protections for the hope of a small- 
er municipality. 

As much as secessionists would like to believe 
breaking apart from Los Angeles would lead to small- 
er government and a small town feeling, the new city 
in the Valley would be a far cry from the nostalgic 
Mayberry. The new city would be the sixth largest city 
in the nation, and as a mjyor metropolis, would still 
face big-city problems. 

Even if Hollywood and the Valley form their own 
cities, it wouldn't make traffic disappear at the city 
limits, as residents of West Hollywood and Beverly 
Hills could attest. Recognizing that our city is made 
up of interconnected neighborhoods, we are better 
able to confront problems such as traffic. 

Instead of breaking up the city, we should focus on 
improving the delivery of services to make Los 
Angeles a safer and better place to hve. I am commit- 
ted to doing this, and I look forward to working with 
the UCLA conmiunity to find solutions to the prob- 
lems we all face together. 

Councilmember Weiss represents the Fifth District of Los 
Angeles, which includes UCLA. 



ARTS(&ENTERTAINMENT 



THE DAILY BRUIN - MONDAY. JULY 15. 2002 



EDITOR'S PICK 



"Midnight Marauders" 

As a revived Smokin' Grooves Tbur kicks off 
this week, heavy on the Atlanta funk straight out of 
the deep dirty South where raunchy reigns 
supreme, let's not forget about Smokin' Grooves 
alumnus A TYibe Called Quest They weren't as 
snappily dressed or as gloriously flamboyant as the 
present headliners Dre and Big Boi, but the hip- 
hop group still showed intensity in dressing down. 

Tieeming with jazzy grooves and clever word- 
play, Q-Tlp and Phife traded their smooth rhymes 
effortlessly on the "Midnight Marauders" album. 
*Electric Relaxation" is an infectious track and 
possibly Quest's crowning achievement. 
"Marauders" showcases the best of this unparal- 
leled group. 



SCREEN SCENE 




I JiPYt^.LASR E^ITEKTAI^fMENT 

Matthew McConaughey plays Van Zan in the movie 
•Reign of Fire." 

•Reign of Fire" 

Spyglass Entertainment 

Starring Matthew McConau^iey, Christian Bale 

When director Rob Bowman introduced his film 
"Reign of Fire" to a near capacity crowd at the Fox 
theater on a July 9 night, he reminded the specta- 
tors that this was a "movie," not a "fUm," because 
people who refer to movies as "films" are "ass- 
holes." The ensuing hour and a half proved Bowman 
quite successful in creating a mo\ie that isn't likely 
to be referred to as a "film" by anyone this side of 
the Dark Ages. 

"Reign of Fire" attempts to be a visceral heart- 
pounding no-nonsense action thrill ride and man- 
ages not to fail completely. 

Set on an Elnglish commune headed by Quinn 
Aborcromby (Christian Bale), in a dragon-induced 
post-apocalyptic era, the film shows residents of the 
commune beginning to doubt Quinn *s plan of simply 
outlasting the dragons as food supplies diminish. 
Then American, Van Zan (Matthew McConaughey), 
shows up with his personal dragon-slaying militia, 
and something is obviously going to give. 

The best part of this movie is that there is enough 
action. Bowman and his editing team keep dialogue 
and character dovelopment fo a solid minimum, 
maintaining the fast pace of the film - 1 mean movie. 
The audience never gets a second to breathe - a 
smart move considering that, if they had time to 
think, they would be unable to draw any positive 
conclusions. 

This movie gamers two paws and not a lesser ratr 
ing simply because in comparison with other 
movies that have come out this summer season, this 
(me doesn't seem that awful The real stars of the 
movie, the dragons, actually have somewhat mini- 
mal screen time, which enhances the effectiveness 
of their a{^>earances. As for the human beings 
involved with the "movie," no one's career will 
probably be damaged, except for the once charming 
heartthrob McConaughey, whose turn as Van Zan is 
equally absurd and embarrassingly comic book-like, 
minus the charisma. 

-Anthony Brxrmberg 



"Road to Perdition" 

Dreamworks 

Starring Ibm Hanks, Paul Newman 

^ ^ ^ ^ "Road to Perdition" does for 
the Irish mob what "TTie Godfather" did for the 
Italian one. Both films show a slice of a culture that 
mixes the highest of virtues (loyalty, family, honor) 
with the lowest of vices (murder, greed, corrup- 
ticxi). They are both also high quality films. 

We've never seen Tbm Hanks like this, as worid- 
weary tough guy Michael Sullivan. Though perhaps 
undeserving of the coveted American Film Institute 
lifetime Achievement Award, Hanks does earn 
some credibility in this role as a mob boss' right 
hand man. 

Sullivan becomes the target of the Irish mafia 
that employs him, and he and his son (lyier 
Hoechlin) go on the lam. Through this the film 
explores the often painful relationships between 
fathers and sons and between religious conviction 
and the gangster life. 

Amid their flight, the film takes us through vin- 
tage Americana, the boundless fields of a Steinbeck 
novel and the stunning recreation of a bustling 
D^ression-era Chicago. Conrad Hall, who was 
UCLA's cinematographer-in-residence last year, 
brings the film a dark, grainy look reminiscent of 
Gordon Willis' work in "The Godfather." Tlie earthy 
visuals provide a nostalgic grit that contrasts the 
smoothed-out digital look of the "Attack of the 
Clones" prequels. 

Director Sam Mendes self-consciously references 
film noir, a genre of post-Worid War II film which 
featured shady characters in a morally ambiguous 
worid. "Road to Perdition" sees it all: the political- 
backstabbing, the jealousy, the cold-blooded mur- 
der and a bank robbeiy sequence reminiscent of 
"Bonnie and Clyde." 

The film's flaws include an uninteresting Jennifer 
Jason Leigh, an un-Irish Hanks, and a tendency to 
be melodramatic. The funeral sequence in the film's 
opening reaches absurdly sugary heights that seem 
forced and clash with the overall dark tone. 

Only Mendes second film (the first was 1999's 
Oscar- wiimer "American Beauty"), "Perdition" sees 
the director turning into a reliable filmmaker. 

-HowardllQ : 



1 

2ptW8 

3pawt 
4 

5 



Sucks 

- Eh ... Could Be Worse 
Good 
BrvdPttSexy 

ClMtiC 



Buzzin' with poetry 



By Marl Nichotson 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
mnichoison^HT)edla.ucia.edu 

In spite of the cafe's dim lifting, Unuiban's objective to provide a 
coanfbrtable creative space is clear - particularly on evenings when the 
sut^iect is whatever open-mic participants deem relevant 

Unuiban's Wednesday nights engage crowds with poetry, storytelling 
and spoken word. Many stay until the wee hours and leave high on cof- 
fee and in;^ired to write something ctown and perform it next time. 

The artists address diverse subjects and themes. One ^>eaker read 
his poem titled "Fuck," which declares, "I needed (Hily a bar, two bour- 
bons and a cigar." 

Another man took on the ice-cream man as his subject of choice, 
simultaneously revering him and ragging on him. 

Another performer described the crutch that cigarettes provide her, 
which sparked empathy in the audience. 

Open-mic host and parirtime guitar teacher TcMiy Perez encourages 
both regular and newcomer artists to feel as at ease on-stage as they are 
when in the audience, fbuOed on caffeine and new acquaintances. 

"People are really firiendly here, fve been looking for a place like 
this," said David Hopkins, who has just moved to Los Angeles fi'om the 
Bronx and is a first-timer at Unurban. 

Perez has hosted the weekly event for a year and a half and has 
ieamed to begin each week when attendees appear ready, coffee drink 
and snack in hand with open ears. 

"It's all about the reader and their work," Perez said. "I allow no ques- 
tions in order to ensure a comfortable room. After all, no one is quali- 
fied to comment on anyone else's work because they aren't in the same 
mind-set as (the writer is)." 

Often audience response and sign-up sheets make people in the ^x>t- 
light feel uncomfortable, like irresponsible children answering to 
adults, according to Perez. That's why Unurban has neither. 

"Pe<^le definitely leave here a little more mature," he said. 

A variety of seating (^ons, fix»m ample benches to plush sofas and 
worn chairs with wheels help create a warm atmosphere and cater to 
the smorgasbord c^ personalities who f^:e(|^ent the coffeehouse. 

OccasicHudly, the eveiung tuzns into a family affair. FrancEyE, an 80- 
year-old regular and avid attendee of readings and similar events 
watches in admiration whenever her 19-yeapold grandscm shares his 
poetry. 

Perez believes, with both poetry and guitar, in teaching passion prior 
to technique. 

"Technique will come as writers learn how to provoke connections 
between their piece and audience members," he said. "Here, almost 
every open mic night is auccessfiil because pe<H>le eventually find some 
plane to connect on, some way of reading (Hie another" 

According to Tora, a poet and regular who recently celebrated her 
21st birthday at the aafe, making that connection is possible. 



MIKE CHIEN/Daily Beuin 

Passionate octogenarian FrancEyE reads at 
Unurban's Wednesday open-mic night 

"Tliere is a conuncm desire to read and understand literature here. 
People of all backgrounds are brought together under that," Taora. 
said. 

The introduction of new themes each week hei^it^M senses, 
though nature and romance are always popular t(^cs, according to 
TWa. 

FYancEyE tackled aging on July 10. ^e tried to decode the secrets 
of longevity but eventually just related it all back to "good genes." 

"Objects new to this place I receive you," FrancEyE read fhmi her 
i>oem. 

Unurban both receives people and provides a place for the devel- 
opment of their identities and expression in the large, (^ten unfriend- 
ly worid of Los Angeles. 

And attendees can get a caffeine buzz vi^iile th^re at it 



Unurban is located at 3S01 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica Poetry open- 
nUc night is on Wednesdays at 7:30, comedy and music openr-mic 

jhts are on Thursdays and Fridays, respectively Call (310) 315- 

>6for details. 



Robert Evans subject 
of HBO documentary 



By Ryan Joe 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 

rjoe@media.ucla.edu 

Producer Robert Evans led the ulti- 
mate Hollywood life - one filled with 
triumph, torment, love, lust, fiiendship, 
betrayal, wheeling, dealing and cocaine. 
He reached his peak in the '70s produc- 
ing numerous classics in American cin- 
ema including "Rosemary's Baby," 
"Chinatown" and "TTie Godfather" But 
scandals, acciisations of murder and 
box office flops in the '80s neariy killed 
Evans, sending him from a life of glam- 



our to a life spent guttering about as a 
Hollywood has-been. 

Now E}vans is the subject in a new 
documentary, "The Kid Stays in the 
Picture," chronicling the Hollywood 
icon's life as a mogul. Brett Morgen and 
Nanette Burstein directed the film 
based on E}vans' autobiography. 

At a recent interview, Evans sat 
down, wearing a blue turtleneck and a 
bolo tie under a pristine white pant suit 
that offset his burnished bronze skin. 
He had a sharp nose, on which sat a pair 
of smoked glasses, the same color as his 

EVANS I Page 8 




USA Films 

Robert Evans (lefl) with Jack Nicholson, 
the star of his 1975 film "Chinatown." 



CURTAIN CALLS 




and the intimacy of the Actors' Gang's 99-seat theater pre- 
sents the raw emotion at full force. 

"The Guys" pushes the audience to remember S^L 11 
not as a media news clip, but as an event fix)m which real 
people emerged as heroes, real people suffered and real 
people are still surviving. 

-Amber Noizumi 

"^Romeo and Juliet** 

(213) 481-2273 

Pershing Square through July 20; South Coast 

Botanic Garden through Aug. 4 




Anthony 
Bromberg 

;)liiii<wij^i»«iuiri»a>ti 



Actors Gangs' 

Helen Hunt and Tim Bobbins l(ick-start the play "The Guys." 

**The Guys'* 

The Actors' Gang 

(323) 466-0666 

Indefinite run; Future cast TBA 



-»««« 



Almost a year after Sept 11, many of us have beccHne 
desensitized from the inundaticm of media. Anne NelscMi's 
new play "TTie Guys" poignantly recovors the humaimess - 
the pain, the irony and the perseverance - of post-Sept 1 1 
America. 

Tim Robbins and Helen Hunt kick-start the indefinite run 
of this sta^^ed reading, but the star power is anything but a 
gimmick Hunt brings skill and sincerity to the role of Joan, 
a new^japer editor who helps a fire captain write the eulo- 
gies for eight men lost in the Worid TVade Center. Tlie 
moment Robbins opens his mouth, he stuns the audience 
with his impeccable New York accent He adeptly portrays 
a gruff Irish-l)om fire captain, underscoring the role with 
vulnerability and grief 

The formula is simple: two chairs with two actors per- 
forming an hour and a half of compelling dialogue that 
leaves the audience moved and shaken. The sparse staging 



While Shake^)eare is often associated with ruffled col- 
lars and tired British accents, 9iake^)eare Festival/LAs pro- 
duction of "Romeo and Juliet" is hip, creative and heated 
with energy. 

The design is so hot that it almost makes you overtook 
the complete absence of chemistry between the actors who 
play the star-crossed lovers. \^th hip-hop dancing, original 
music by underground band Lava Diva and a setting resem- 
bling a disco, the first half of the play brims with energetic 
youth. But the sterile relationship between Romeo and 
Juliet takes this play fit)m scorching to lukewarm. 

Maulik Pancholy, who plays Romeo, lacks the masculine 
prowess needed to pull off this romantic hero and at times 
seemed more feminine than Juliet The only hints of passion 
were seen in his interactions with Mercutio. 

The outdoor setting in downtown's Pershing Square 
makes for a nice summer evening of theatre under the stars. 
The best part is the admission is firee with a canned food 
donation. 

So if you're up for an ei\joyable evening of Shake^)eare 
and pc^ culture, this is worth your can of creamed com. 

-Amber Noizumi 

IpaMf -Sucks 

2 paws * Eh ... Could Be Worse 

3paws-Good 

4 paws • Brad Pftt Sexy 

5 paws • Classic 



Punk bands rock at Warped Tour 



By Michelle V. GonzaJes 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
mgonzales(§)medla. ucla.edu 

An overabundance of music, a lack 
of venue organization, the smell of 
beer and sweai, and the quick grow- 
ing pile of garbage are some of the 
most consistent aspects of the annual 
Warped Ibur. 

The tour didn't disappoint when it 



arrived at the Los Angeles Coliseum 
July 10 and 11. Vans Shoe Company 
hosts the annual festival, which 
included several stages, vendor 
booths and extreme athletes. 

Due to the Coliseum's awkward 
set-up, fans rushed from one stage to 
another, crowding narrow pathways, 
frustrating both security and the festi- 
val attendees. Adding to the mess 
^ were the innumerable vendors who 



provided free flyers, handouts and 
CDs, most of which patrons quickly 
tossed into garbage cans or onto the 
floor. 

The two main stages alternated 
musical acts, with few minutes 
between sets. This setup allowed fans 
to hear a different band play every 
thirty minutes, but also caused many 

WARPED I Page 8 



Donaldj Double 
can guide you 
to summer fun 

This is our life, the collective life of the 
UCLA student bo^y: we live sheltered in 
Westwood, hurrying to and fro, worrying, 
stressing and taking for granted the mecca of 
entertainment possibilities that the c^ around 
us is. 

Tb counteract this distressing phenome- 
non, introduce yourself to 
our two new heros, super- 
heros if you will - yes, a 
dynamic duo even, well 
call them Donald and 
Double, or D and D for 
short First, understand 
that this dynamic duo 
doesnt attend UCLA. In 
fact, they go to an Ivy 
League university well 
call for our purposes 
"Princeton." At 
"Princeton" they play 
football, go to class and 
complain like regular stu- 
dents. Now this next part 
is where the brilliant insist comes in, and 
where we - the pedestrian students of our 
own esteemed university - can learn some- 
thing, to take advantage of what is around 
you. 

During the course of their last humble 
mild-mannered year at "Princeton," D and D 
put their East Coast heads together and came 
to one conclusion: they should head West for 
the summer So, as their summer started to 
blossom with California dreams and a dis- 
dain for responsibility, the pair set out across 
the country and landed in Los Angeles on 
Landfair Avenue, the epicenter of the UCLA 
party scene. Little did they imagine the 
immediate effect this would have on them. 
Leaving their own school and heading out to 
the bright sun of ours had neariy the same 
effect on them as the yeUow sim of our plan- 
et had on Kiypton's Kal-EH, or Si9)erman. In 
Los Angeles D and D found themselves no 
mere mortal students of a constricting uni- 
versity. Instead they were suddenly comman- 
ders of cool, finders of fun and hipsters of 
hype. 

You may be asking yourself what the 
extent of their powers are - a legitimate 
question, but one impossible to answer in 
this humble first episode in the epic chroni- 
cles of D and D. Suffice to say for now that 
these two brilliant young men immediately 
recognized the place we live in as a celebrity- 
filled land of entertainment Oh, they saw 
their Candyland and chose not to stress, but 
to fi^lic in the Candy Castle. TTiey took and 
continued to take and rip apart the glories 
you and I bypass daily without appreciation. 

A little more background on our heroes 
now, before we entertain musings about their 
first adventure. D and D have nothing to do 
this summer. Literally, they have no jobs, no 
classes and no responsibilities except to take 
some Creatine and work out fix)m time to 
time to stay in football shape. This lack of a 
schedule and tasks hanging over their heads 
facilitates their fun adventures, as does their 
strict adherence to the "where there's a will 
there's a way" philosophy. D and D are rela- 
tively buff, good-looking, charming young 
men, with biting senses of humor and for 
now that's all you really need to know. 

BROMBERQ | Page 8 



8 THE DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY, JULY 15, 2002 



ARTStfiEKTERTAINMENT 



WARPED J Memorable performance I EVANS | nimmakers attempt to 

■ ion highlight of evening convey scope of producer's life 



I from page 7 

to miss their favorite bands or hear new ones 
Playing on the third Vans stage, opposite 
the two main ones, was New Jersey's 
Thursday, an emotionally charged rock band, 
who gave a powerful performance The 
melodic riffs and screammg vocals fueled the 
fans, who responded energetically to the 
band. Even though Thursday did not play 
near the vicinity of the main stage, it managed 
to draw in dedicated fans and make some 
new ones. 

Record label Drive Thru Records spon- 
sored a stage, which featured performances 
by bands Allister. Home Grown, The Starting 
Line, Finch, Rx Bandits and others Unique to 
Los Angeles was the Mean Street stage, spon- 
sored by the Southern California music maga- 
tine of the same name. It hosted a punk/hip- 
hop stage featuring undergroimd hip-hop acts 
re LA. Symphony and Anticon. 
Though attendees had easy access to this 
Stage, the head count was lower in front of 
these acts, showing most of the attendees' 
^oals on seeing their favorite bands. 

Other stages included a Punkrocks.net 
$tage that featured Yellowcard and The Used, 
a Criterion Records stage with a one-day 
Iciest appearance by The Ataris, and a stage 



sponsored by clothing company Volcom. 

New to the Warped tour this year were 
tents that featured independent filmmaking, 
reverse day care for parents, locker check- 
ins, and an exhibit titled "Warped are they 
now?" which displayed articles on past 
Warped artists. 

Toward the end, attendees appeared to be 
tired, as the festivaJ lasted from noon until 
sundown. 

The biggest highUght came from memo- 
rable peiformaiues by Bad Religion. As the 
band closed the night, fans roared with 
excitement to hear songs from albums Uke 
"Stranger Than Fiction" and the more melod- 
ic and accessible songs from its most recent 
release, "The Process of Belief" 

Familiar to the Warped stages was NOFX, 
which gave fans its usual goofy jokes and 
songs from a long list of albums. A huge 
crowd filled the floor, despite the band's sep- 
aration from radio play and music videos 
made for mainstream television. 

A surprise performance from A.F.I, also 
added excitement. 

The festival's mainly punk repertoire 
included crunching guitar chords coming 
from mainstream, indie and surprise acts, all 
the way down to the general apathy festival 
organizers had for the fans who attended. 



from page 7 

salt-laid-pepper hair. 

As Evans spoke in his thick voice, he 
stretched a rubber band between his fin- 
gers as if exercising them. 

"Hello, hello," he said, and immediately 
his voice was recognizably alluring. The 
film makes it clear Evans could probably 
charm the skin off a rattlesnake. 

"The crazy thing about Bob is that Bob, 
and this happens over and over, basically 
ruins our lives, stabs us in the back, and by 
the end, we're apologizing to him," 
Burstein said. "Bob is one of the most suc- 
cessftil seducers of the past 60 years." 

The directors sought to capture Evans' 
charm in their film, according to Morgen. 
The film distorts, colorizes or otherwise 
animates photographs to convey the sense 
of vibrancy in E>vans' life. 

"Using imagery to seduce is the essence 
of filnmiaJdng," Morgen said. "By distort- 
ing each photo, we are giving a wink-wink, 
nudge-nudge to the audience that this film 
is all told through Evans' singular voice." 

The filnunakers did not attempt to fac- 
tually retell events. Instead they tried to 
recapture Evans' memories of his 
Hollywood past. 



These memories run the gamut from the 
exhilarating, romantic and schmaltzy to 
the depressing and deeply personal. 

"It ain't a Disney book," Evans said. "I 
wrote it to let my son know who I was." 

Joshua Evans, a fihnmaker in his own 
right and Evans' only son, grew up living 
with his mother, actress Ali MacGraw. 
According to Evans, the book helped him 
reach out to a son he didn't know. 

If Evans wrote the book to introduce 
himself to his son, then Morgen and 
Burstein made the film to introduce Evans 
to the mainstream. Both Burstein and 
Morgen approached the documentary as 
something that could potentially reach 
wide audiences, something they felt 
should have a theatrical release instead of 
being relegated to the small screen on 
HBO. Consequently, the filmmakers 
sought to reduce the largely anecdotal 
book into a story with a concise arc. 

The film, at 88 minutes, is like a large, 
bombastic flipbook of Evans' life. At 
times, the film nught seem to sugarcoat 
the grime and grit which dominated 
Evans' life for a brief period. At this, 
Evans grins. 

"Lemme tell you - it's a lot easier to 
watch it than to live it," Evans said. 



BROMBERG 

from page 7 

If only some greater hand than 
my own will help guide my words 
to be worthy of these two illustri- 
ous heroes, I'll begin to tell you the 
true stories and real adventures 
behind the mythic tandem of D and 
D. 

Not long ago from a place proba- 
bly not far from where you are right 
now, two unassuming young men 
just in from LAX were moving into 
their subletted j^artment on 
Landfair. After a hard day's work 
the two collapsed into their newly 
installed plush chairs and sighed. 
What to do, oh what to do? 

A lightbulb then went off over 
their collectively expensive brains, 
and they got up to go outside. Thus 
began Donald and Double's trans- 
formation into the dynamic duo of 
D and D, who impose themselves 
and their unique brand of fun on 
the entertainment capital of the 
worW. And with that, your humble 
notetaker is out of space, and I did- 
n't even get to tell you of the story 
of D and D and the film premieres. 
So make sure to stay tuned with 
your ears open, your eyes to the 
ground and your finger on the page 
- their exploits may come your way. 



AHention All Sfudenf Groups 



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Mon Tut (11 45 2 15 5 00) 7 40 1000 

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Mon Tut (1 1 10 2 00 4 45) 7 30 10 1 5 



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815 9:3010 30 

Cinema 4 The Crocodde Hunter Coiksion Course (PG) 

Mon Thu 10:30 12 45 3:00 5:15 7:30 945 

Cinema 5 Men In Black 2 (PG 13) 

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Mon-Thul015^10 45 11 15 'll 3012 35*105 

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•8 50 +9 25 10:00 'lO 25 10:55 

Cinema 6 The Powerpuft Girls Mowe (PG) 

Mon Thu 10101210 2:10 4:106 10 

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Cinema 8 Hey AmoM' The Movie (PG) 

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Mon Thu 10:20 12:35 2:50 5 05 7 20 9 40 

Cinema 10 Minonty Report (PG 13) 

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Cinema 11 TtieBoumekJentity (PG 13) 

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Mon-Tue 1245 3:15 (400) 7 15 930 10:30 

Scooby Dog (PG) 

Mon-Tue 1 45 (4 30) 

Hey ArnoUi The Movie (PG) 

Mon Tue 11 45am 

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Index 



Announcements 



100 Campus Happenings 
1200 CampusOnaruzations 
liao Greeks (mn 
300 Campus Recruitment 
400 Campus Services 
900 Birthdays 
eOO Legal Notices 
"no Lost A Found 
800 Mtscellane ous 
IflBO Otfituanes CSof) 

1900 Personal Messages 

2000 Personals 

20SO Pregnancy 

2100 RecreationaJ Activities 

2200 Research Sub/ects 

2300 Spenn/Egg Donors 

2«0 TJofcffte O/ferw^ 

2500 TJbUcfte tVanfecy 



MerdumKse 



2700 /^pbrues 
2B0O yVtf^ntys 
2900 acjGfesStalB 
3000 Anns 
3100 C^fryCan]^ 
3200 C^rnaasOrKDrdar:; 
3300 Qaiactite 
3400 Oirnnj^i 




34S0 SartMmQynes 
3S00 arftfp 
3800 Garaffa^MSales 
3700 Haemf^oduct 
3800 Mnafenatxc 
3B00 ^^jSKal hstumerte 
4000 OloeEgupmenr 
4100 /te 

4200 RenaEqu^xmn 
4300 5)xrteaMcrnflnr 
4400 aactoncOeMicas 
4S00 TaOeStJorte 



M3, 



4800 ^(A7Ax8SSDries 
4700 >4tJl7#ismr)c:)e 
4800 AutoRepaf 

4BtJOAulos for Sate 
5000 aoalsibrSal? 
5100 Moltroolesibr Sat 
S200 Pad9^j 
5300 ScsDl97f;)ol?aqQar 
5400 Scooters lor Sate 
5600 l«r«al?ibraanr 



7h9ve/ 



5800 Resorts/Hoteis 
5620 ^iblssOAarR/ 
5640 ^teM^msK^ 
5880 TaaSMIe Service 
5680 Tmef Destnatons 
5700 r/aie^rdsefe 
5720 Mufon/MBVes 



Services 



5800 1-900 numbers 
5900 FrianaatAKi 
6000 ^taianGe 

6100 ComputrftBmet 
6150 Fareif^ Languages 
6200 /isaf7anu^Sarv«3a> 
6250 /%:tr9Mx}b»i|7Cbsses< 
6300 /^pa^4^K»^/«tneys 
6400 A4cM9rs6l7age 
6500 MustLessons 
6600 aarsoTB^Sarvaas 
6700 Ratessuia/Senaoes 
6800 r^ames 
8800 TtiiiiimliUdi 
7000 futyng OffeTBc/ 
7100 TuMig Wanted 
7200 r>pnp 
7300 mmigHe^ 



Employment/Careers 



7400 Business Opportunities 
7S00 CamerOpporiiiies 

7800 ChUCareOmgnd 
7700 ChtUCaremmod 
7800 He0\filar»Bd 

TfOD HK^TechJabS' 

7840>Utys£x»asM^r^ 

7900 HajsesOri? 

8000 tUBmship 

8100 RsrsonatAssBOnDe 

8200 rampararyfirrpkynenr 

8300 ItAjr^oar 




Housing 



8400 Apartments fa Rent_ 

dKH Afjatments to Shared 

8500 ^xnmemsFumetied' 

8800 Cond(yibmtKuse for Rent 

8700 Condc/Rmtouse for Sate 

8800 Guesthouse for Rent 

8600 HousetorRent 

9000 HouseforSaie 

9100 HouBBtuaCribr/lsrJtSai? 

9e0O Housing fieeded 

9300 RoomforHe^ 

9400 RoomfdrRent 

9600 Roommates-Privat Room 

9800 Roommates-Shared Room 

9700 S^liiefi; 

9800 l^caftnflan^ 



CLASSIFIED 



MONDAY, JULY 15. 2002 ■ THE DAILY BRUIN 



9 



To place an ad, call 

310.8^5.2221 



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By Phone 

310.825.2221 

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Use words tfiat best describe 
what you are selling 

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Indude all ttie facts: condi- 
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Special Feaiuns 
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i." 



t 



^S 



Your Classifieds 
are a click-click 
away every day 







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mm Disti 

www.villagedi8h.cofii 

Fal/WbrtBr & Spring/Summer 
310J2&2161 



hL«SSIFIEO 



Every 5th and lOVi week, 
310.8252161 



Find everything you need online at 

WWW.BRUINMARKETPUtCE.GOM 



I 

Summer Publication Calendar 





tesys Dflii 


p — „ 


> 




Week One 


6/24 


6/21 on 


noon 




Week Two 


7/1 


6/28 






Week Three 


7/8 


7/3 






Week Four 


7/15 


7/12 






Week Five 


7/22 


7/19 






Week Six 


7/29 


7/26 






Week Seven 


8/5 


8/2 


^ 




Week Eight 


8/12 


8/9 


i- 




Week Nine 


8/19 


8/16 






Week Ten 


8/26 V 


8/23 


J 













f^T^HrHrHri 



announcements 

1100-2600 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



ballroom@ucla.edu 

Swing-Salsa-Tango 

SUMMER LESSONS 

MONDAYS 7-1 0p.m. 

@Ackerman Union 2408 

ENDS August 26th 

BEGINS Sept. 30th 

Field Trips all Summer 

LEARN SWING-SALSA-TANGO-WALTZ® 7 
p.m. Learn- Popular- Line/Folk- Danc8s9- 1 0pm 
www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ballroonDdance 
www.geocities.com/SwingSalsaTango Ball- 
room-Dance-Club&lnternational-Foik-Dance- 
Club. 310-284-3636 ballroom@ucla.edu 



2000 

Personals 



SEEKING 

SOPHISTICATED 
FEMALE 

AFFLUENT CEO of a prominent company 
seeking companwn for private jet getaways 
and social engagements. Exciting environ- 
ment and sophisticated experience for the 
right person. Great dinners at restaurant and 
cultural events. Seeking intelligent, outgoing, 
fun-loving, and sophisticated female from 
UCLA. Will interact with high-profile people, so 
discretion and social grace a must. Inquiries to 
be directed at 310-285-3871. 



2200 

Research Subjects 



Couples Needed to Participate in a 
Research Study on Everyday Interactions 

UCLA IRB* 001- 12-Otr-OI 

•Couptw wtx) have bean dating tor s<x months or mora »«. 

etigibie to partiapale 

Both mtnibmit o> c<Mip4« naad to parttdpat* 

Payment is $50 per couple 
Call (310) 794-9108, or 
e-mail: couples_study@yahoo.com 



I MEDITATE 

Three 4- week workshops starting week of 
7/23. Ackerman Union. 7pm. Call: 310-645- 
0271 for details. 



BRAIN ACTIVITY 
STUDY. 

Volunteers paid up to $350. Healthy adults 
needed to participate in a study of the ef- 
fects of medication on brain activity(EEG). 
Subjects will receive FDA-approved medi- 
cation or placebo for four-weeks. Particip- 
ants will be asked to undergo five EEG's 
and a series of physical tests/rating scales. 
Cail:31 0-825-3351. 



1800 

Miscellaneous 



-isp^* 



1^ 1800 

IWscellaneoiis 




Pick up a 

fOjonht 




In the student bookstore and look lor the white 
Recycler street racks at nearby locations. 



KSoClA Ooini<MM*cat)oni tMard h*/ aupporta (ha UnMartrty e0 CaMorrMa^ potcy or« nondlaortmkMllan No maHum tfiat aocapt advartnamai H« attvch praaant paraona o( v>y ongv) 

. 9a> <jr saiuai onamamn n a damaanvig «iay or to inpty thai may ara kmiiad powtana. ca pablll h aa. rolaa. or alMua m aooaty Htttm Iha 0^ Brun nor Iha ASUCLA Carrvnumcatioo 

»i»ia at iga l ad any ot ttia «a»v»caa adwartwd or tha a O ia> tw amar <« lapraaai^a d tn Vm mum Any paraar> t)aaav*ig that an advarUMmant niNi iaaua vKMad tha Bowd^ pokey on 

staiad harax aXouM commumcaf co rnplarta w «»n>ng to tha Aiat a i W 0»actor Ply Bnm. 118 KarcWw«>Hi«. 308 Wtaiwood Plaza. LoaAneataa 90024-1 641 Foraaaa- 

«>m houamg dmcrmnation protXama cal lh« UCLA Houmng OMca al (310) 8?S-4271 or ci« tha WtHinii Fa« Houang Offica at (310) 47S-9671 CtaaMad ada Mo v>p«« ar>-toa 

at |«tp /wwwdMtybruaiuciaadu Placamarrt orvkrw • oMarad aa a conptonanlary aarvica tor cualomara and • not guaranlaad Tha Oaily Bruvi ■ raaporwibta lor Iha tkat mcorract Irww- 

onty Mtnor typographKal arror* ara not akgitxa tor rakx<da For any rakjnd. tha Daily Bruvi ClaaaiBad DapartmarM mual ba noUMad at an arror on tfw Aral day ot publication by noon 



ON CAMPUS BANKING 

Your on-campus & on-line banking source for 
students, employees & alumni. Free checking, 
student toans. car toans. Campus office: >Vck- 
erman A- level, www.ucu.org, call 310-477- 
6628. 



2000 

Personals 



FRIENDSHIP? LOVE? European lin- 
guist/writer, good-looking, gentle, cosnwpoli- 
tan, accomplished, mature, healthy lifestyle, 
k)ves literature/traveling/outdoors, seeks at- 
tractive/affectionate/natural young female, any 
race/origin, possibly romance/mamage 310- 
573-0270/maniwolf @ mail com 



EARN $100. SUBJECTS WITH YELLOW 
TEETH needed for a teeth whitening study be- 
ing conducted Culver City (3 visits). 310-846- 
8330. 

HEALTHY ADULTS AGES 18-30 NEEDED for 
a research study on mucosal immunity at 
UCl^. The research study involves ^nedical 
procedures including Wood donatk>ns and sig- 
moidoscopies (a flexible tube put into the rec- 
tum). Subjects will be paid up to $100 per vis- 
it. To find out more about the study caJI: Cha- 
ries Price at 310-206-7288 Peter A. Anton 
M.D., Dept of Medicine, Pnncipal Investigator. 

SMOKERS WANTED!!! 

EARN $10 IN 25 MINUTES. Fun easy memo- 
ry study. Anonymous. On Campus. CaJI Dani: 
310-801-1406 or email danip@postmari<.net 



2200 

Research Subjects 



WAhfTED: HEALTHY volunteers, ages 18-60, 
for research project studying brain metabolism 
and blood flow Requires arterial venous 
catheter placement Participants will receive 
$45/hr for a near-full day study. For more into, 
call 310-825-9121 or e-mail birc@med- 
net.ucla.edu. 

WOMEN AGES 18-40 with and without pre- 
menstrual syndrome wanted for a 3 month re- 
search study which entails mood diaries, Wood 
tests, 2 OPTIONAL spinal taps and taking Pro- 
zac for 14 days. Must not be taking any other 
medication $350 for your time. 310-825-2452. 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



Pay your tuition 
vim eggj™ 



If you're a woman between the 
ages of 1 8 and 32, you can earn 
money easily and anonymously 

by donating your eggs to an 
infertile couple. 

Compensation is $5,000 

For more information, please call 

The Center for Egg Options 

310/546-6786 

•The Center for Egg Options, LUC 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 18-31 
wishing to help infertile couples. 

$5,000 
^Call Mirna (818) 832-1494 



HI 



EGG DONOR NEEDED 

By infertile coupte-not an agency, (wife is 
Bruin alumni). Dark hair arxj eyes arxj un- 
der 27 y/o preferred. $4000 or more. Larry 
310-914-7600. 




3000 

Books 



MCAT BOOKS & EXAMS (w/explanations). Ir>- 
cludes Comprehensive Kaplan & Berkeley Re- 
view Study Materials as well as numerous otfh 
er books. 818-990-5331. 



3500 

Furniture 



INSTANT BEDROOM! BedArame (full), 2 new 
dressers, 2 bookshelves, lamp, ntghtstand. fil- 
ing cabinet. $400 obo. 310-837-6897. 

OFFICE FURNITURE- desks, chairs, etc. 
Tues July 16th 12pn>-5pm. 1081 Westwood 
Blvd. 1st floor. 310-209-0876 x513. 



3600 

Garage Sales 



MOVING SALE 

Retro Record Cabinet; Twin Mattress Set; 
Contemporary Desk w/Bookcase; Coffee 
Tabie; Small Bookcase; TV Cart; Computer: 
Call 310-592-4384. 



m^WW^mm 




transportation 

4600-5500 



^900 

Autos for Sale 



1983 FORD 
MUSTANG, 

Black exterior, biack interior, automatic. 
Power everything. Good conditiof* Price 
negotiable. 323-547-8167. 323-269-9960. 



1986 SUBARU GL: 5-speed, 4-door, 116,000 
miles, A/C, clean, tape deck, very good condi- 
tion. $1500. OBO. Tien:21 3-738-8733 

1988 ACURA LEGEND. Gold, 4-door, au- 
tomatic, A/C, great condition. Yakima bike 
rack. Sony CD changer. 140k miles. $4000 
obo. 310-745-0075. 



1 






jWjKMIU MJUI . NfiONDAY, JULY 15. 2002^ 



GUSSIFIED 



2200 

Research Sdhjects 



2200 

Research Siihjects 



2200 

Research Siihjecls 



^^^jj^^^^^j^jj^^^^j^^jf^^^^ 






cirouni^ ccitsj 



' J'A.JlfBPl 



r^f^'^T^plfta^RB^K? 



jaflfegg''^ •-"'■ ^ - ^!^ » 



1 bii^^^ja*^-..^ 



IP you hove problems cwound cots, you moy be Interested In 
participating In a clinical study of on Investigational use of a 

FDfl-opproved medication. 

During the study, you luill receive: 

Free ollergi^ tests 

Free medication for your allergies 

Fir>onciol compensation up to $385 

If vou ore Interested, please coll: 
Dr. Jonathan Corren, MD 
Clinical Faculty at UCLfl 
310477-1734 
extension 242 







4ji ijj. 4{i 4{. ^ 4^ ijg. ^ 4{i ^ ^ ^ ijg, 4^ i| 



•- NOT A CONDOM 



•%.?• 



•%.tf. 



Consider a new vaginal gel designed to protect 
against pregancy and infection. Couples who 
join a major, federally funded study will test a 
diaphragm with either the gel or regular 
spermicide as birth control for 7 months. 



$300 



plus free supplies, movie posses/CDS/video rentals 

Call SOO 521 5211 



Ho HMi MillVr Iroiii sm^vv VvM\m\^iv\\i\\ S>mi)loiih? 



IK2> and Beriex LflborMvtos «« oanduding a 6 montt raMirch sfejdy for wo^ 
Symptoms (PMS) You may quM^ tor Ms itudy if )OJ sxperienca aonie of trw tol^^ 
•aak betore yov merwiruai cyde: 

• Depreswd aood • Tcutoa • IrritaMHty • Fcctt^ twddeidy i^ ar MorM 
QMifying participants must 

• Have rcf alar aiiailiaal cycks 

• Be brtweca tkc afN af It and 4« (3« if yea'rr a latokcrj 

• Not be aaiag BM&aliaM fM- the treataMat of PM&, 
aatiilfprraaaaai, kcrtal tre a taieati or birth c« 

iW b> provfclid t 




fc^- 



Some wnman mHN be given 9w shxly medcation. and otfiers wil receive a sugr pi (piacabo) 

Yo/ wl ba paid tor yotf partdpaHon 

T« get more InfomiattoB «boat taktaif pmrt in this itndy 

CoMact Dr. Andrea Raplda at t'CLA OB/GYN 






(3IO)S25-2452 




Autos for Sale 



1982 MAZDA *i4IATA Blue convwtibla. A/C. 
84l«nilM. car cover. UCLA platM. $3800. 310- 
964-4574 

1995 EXPLORER SPORT. ExpedMon model. 
4x4. Fuly-loaded. MM condition Green wAan 
leather CO, slap aides, custom-wheels, looks 
brarxj new. $7500obo. 818-597-1469. 

1995 HONDA CIVIC HB. 5 spd. A^. radiO^O. 
dean title, on/^f TTkMel mainlainad. Great carl 
$4560. 310-472-9841. 

1995 Honda EX V -tech. D«k green 5-apeed. 
a/c. CD. Gorgeous, runs perfectly. 93k. $7200 
obo. 310-837-6897. 



6000 

Instimnce 



CycIeTime Insur 



Motorcycle • Motor Scooter • Moped 

UABNJTY INSURANCE IS T>«E LAW1 

rrS LESS THAN YOU THINK! 

No Kidding! Ctf tor a (tm quolal 

(310)275-6734 

Exchang* ad tor mmtmum $10.00 
diaoount wflh nturrn'mM purOtmam 



6 ISO 

Foreicjii Lanrjiiages 



1996 HONDA CIVIC DX COUPE. Red. 2dr. 
nMlUial. 80k. $6200 obo email: 
mhaahibeOyahoo.oom or cal 310-476-7016. 

2001 SUBARU IMPREZA- great nwuntain and 
dly carl Outback Sport wagon, ailvier, af wheel 
dri>w. 4cyirxler, Sapaad, A/C, power wtrid- 
owa&kxrks. am/hn/c aaaetla/alareo. 17k n>i, 
$15.000obo. 310-318-6073. 



5100 

Motorcycles for Sale 



MOTORCYCLE/MOTORSCOOTER CMC 
TOMCAT' . New, Auto, easy to drive and 
pwlL European style. SpectaJ price $888 ph: 
Tolfree:1 -677-41 9-0242 



FRENCH/PERSIAN 

(FARSI) 
PRIVATE TEACHER 

For beginr>ers and tofa^grters. TrUinguai. 
Persian (FarsiVFrench/EngNah. Mrs. Sor- 
aya 310-979-7040. 




6200 

Health Services 



AMAZING! 
SKIN THERAPY 

Natural peeNr^g. ONE step reduces wrinkles, 
alopa acr>e, promotes youngar & haaRhiar akin 
just wtthin 2- 3w eeks. RasuNa guaranteed. CaU 
Iris 310-275-3604. 



DENTISTRY 

TEETH 
WHITENING 

DENTAL EXAM^x-ray^ctewung. $60. Reg- 
ular $140. Teeth whitening. $7S/arch. 10921 
WMshire #505 310^4-0066. www. 
derrtist.com. Dr. Moe Shanwnaie. 



1967 HONDA ELITE 2SOoc. Runs grsat. taati 
2 hairnets included. Must sel becauae moving. 
$900obo. CaM Adam 310-624-4524 

HONDA ELITE SCOOTER-BLUE-Great con- 
dMon, eaay transportation to arvj campus. 2 
llaimata included m pnce. $700 909-961- 



S900 

Financial Aid 



STUDENT LOANS 

University CredN Unkxi is your Stafford and 
PLUS \om lender (Lender Code 832123) 
Campua ofBce: Ackennan A-level 310-477- 
6629; www ucu.org 



6300 

Legal Advice/ Attoineys 




IMMIGRATION 

Grven Cards, Work Permits, Change of 

Status, Citizenship, Visa Extensions, 

Company Start-ups, and more... 



» 



Anqel 



VISA aNTTR' 



Reasonable Rates 

310-837-3266 Fax: 310-559-8479 

email: angelctitivatt.net 

lotaJ Confidentiality Guaranteed. 
Privately Owned and Operated. 

Proud Member of the Better 
Business Bureau 




/lllstate 



you're in good handa 
Mike Azer Insurance Aoency, Inc 

(310) 312-O202 

1281 NA/ostvs/ood Blvd. 

C2 l3lk» So. oi VN/llal-»lr«) 

24 Hoofs g Day Sefvtce 



DAILY 

CLASSIFIEDS 



|: 6AOO 

' ifeg > . ^ Movers/Storage 



BEST MOVERS. Licensed, insured. Lowest 
ratea. Fast. courteous4careful Many students 
moved tor $103. Lic.-T-1 63844. Tvw) 24 loot 
tnicks NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO 
LARGE! 1-800-2-GO-BEST Voicemail/|3aoer: 
800-246-2378. 

JERRY'S MOVING4DELIVERY. The careful 
movers. Experienced, reliable, same-day de- 
Ivwy. Packing, boxes available. Also, pick-up 
donattons for American Carx^r Society. Jer- 
ry©31 0-391 -5657. 




6500 

Mtisic Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedKated profes- 
skx»l. At your home or WLA studio. Ist-less- 
on free. Ho drum set necessary, ^4eil:323-654- 
8226. 

FREE THE BEALTTY OF YOUR VOICE 
THROUGH GOOD VOCAL TECHNIQUE. 10 
years European operatic experlerKe. Eastman 
graduate. Gale 310-470-6548. 

VOICEA>IANO COACHING; Broadway show 
tunes. $20/hr.$40 at your house. Studio 410 N. 
Rossmore Ave. 323-461 -5204. DavkJ Rishton. 
AMI 



6600 

Personal Services 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Comprahanatva Diaaartabon Aaaiatarwa 
Thaaaa. Papara, and Paraonai Statomants 

Propoaaii and Booka 

imamabonal Studanta Waiooma. Sinoa 1865 

Sliaron laar. PtiJ>. 

www.Bear-Write.com I 
(310) 470-6662 | 




EL SEGUNDO company kx>king for part-time, 
flexible hours, experienced administrator. 
Must be fwniliar with MS2000 server. MSSOL, 
MSExchange. Web/MaH sen^. MS-XP>Of- 
ftoe. Manage broadband intemet/intrartet net- 
work fcx 20^ users. Knowledge of hardware 
troubteahooting experience a must. E-mail re- 
sume and refereru^es: Jor- 
danlw® adelphia.net 



JUL /mniD HEip 

Personal Statements, Papers, Theses, 
Dissertations, Books, & Proposols 

Comprehensive help by PhD from UC 
International Students Welcome 

(323) 665^145 



FORMER ENGLISH TEACHER: W/ Masters 
from U-Ctiicago, editaMord processes dlsser- 
tatk>ns, proposals, screenplays, personal 
tialaments, resumes, international students 
watoome. Wlnstow's.-3i(M7&-9585. 

MEDICAUDErfTAL 

SCHOOL PERSONAL 

STATEMENTS 

AND ESSAYS. Consulting. Writing, Editing. 
Creative expertise. Also resumes, cover let- 
ters, dissertation formatting. Credit Cards. Ace 
Words. Etc. 310-820-6830 



NIGHT OWL 

Research. Editing. Writing. OPEN 24-7. 
Finest quality at reaaonable rates. Interna- 
tional students wekxxne. Call Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 



PROFESSIONAL 
EDITING I 
SERVICES ' 

Critical reading arxl editing of manuscripts, 
dissertations. Multiple pricing according to \he 
job. Contact for information or brochure: my- 
writer9att.net or call 818-243-9903. 
www.4mywriter.oom 



7000 

Ulloring Offered 



AAA TUTOR'S CLUB 

HOME TUTORING for students Pre/K-12. AH 
Academic Subjects, including Foreign Lan- 
guagaa and Computer Training Call:3l0-234- 
0101 orwww.TheTutorsClub.com 

FOREIGN ACCENT REDUCTION. Communi- 
cate with darttyA accuracy Especially recom- 
mended for foreign T A'sAgraduates entering 
business worM. Taught by experienced profes- 
sors. 310-226-2996. www.accurateen- 
gliih.oom. 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



www.Victory Travel 



Bio-Sa^259 CHECK 0UT^^^^"S«9 

Argentina S259 oUR CHEAP Mexico City..Sl 23 

iile S2W RATES ''"3^«^'"3'3-S229 

Linia*Pery...S17S ^^^^^^ Costa Rica...Sl 99 

Cancyn ....S169 VXL J*^ ^^^ ^^^^ *'' 



Vacation Packages: Costa Rica- Los Cabos- Cancun 
Woujf Discounts Last Minute Deals 

f>f ICC& .i»c nnrtt way R T rc?q H Restrictions .-ipplv CSI 20!>386l -4n 



1-800-878-9986 




MELANIE'S MASTERS: 

AFFORDABLE 

TUTORING 

All ages-sut>jects English, Math. Foreign Lan- 
guage, Computer, Standardized tests, sports, 
Arts&Crafts, piano/violln/guitar, singing I 
Babysitting. 310-442-9565. 

MY-TUTOR.COM Math/Physics/Statis- 

tics/English/Mebrew, chemistry/biology, 
Econ/Accounting, 4Frer>ch, Computer pro- 
gramming. Computerized statistical analysis 
available. Tutoring service. Call anytinr>e. 800- 
90-TUTOR. 

PREMIERE TUTORING 

Premium private tutonng for the LSAT, GMAT. 
& ORE. Intense preparation, reasonable rates. 
Call 323-660-4132 or www.premJeretutor.com 

PROFESSIONAL WRITER/TEACHER will 
tutor English, writing, conversations. 
University and High School levels. 
International students welcome. 310-475- 
9585. 

SP. ED. TUTORING 

FOR LD/ADO by PHD educator. Individualized 
program in reading, math, writing, computer 
typing. 310-473-8911 or 310-234-0774. 

SPANISH TUTOR: Native speaker. Conversa- 
tiorud, Grade levels and all ages. Flexible 
hours. Call Noelle 310-273-3593 

SPEAK ITALIAN? 

TAKE CONVERSATIONAL ITALIAN as a tool 
with your Italian class or just for fun. Contact: 
Usa Vacca, 323-839-7126. 

UCLA PROF TUTOR 

MATH TUTOR. All Levels of Math. UChicago 
Ph.D. Assistant Professor at UCLA. Winner of 
teaching award. Call Paul: 310^7-7796. 

WRITING TUTOR 

Kind and patient Stanford graduate. Help with 
the English language — for students of ail 
ages/teveis. 310-440-3118. 



7100 

Ttitorinc) Wanted 



FUN, HAPPY MATH TUTOR for ll-year-oW 
girt. Beverty Hills. 310-205-0226. 

THAI TUTORING to teach beginner and trans- 
lation to visitor from ThailarKl, flexible hours, 
optional room available at discounted rates. 
310-772-8685. 

WANTED: 

UCLA student fluent in English and Mandarin 
to teach 11 -year-old boy. Pay $15/hr, 
20hr8/wk. Fax 310-917-1101. 



7200 

Typing 



WORD PROCESSING specializing in theses, 
dissertations, transcription, legal, psych, 
resun>es, fliers, brochures, mailing lists, re- 
ports. 310-628-6939. 



7300 

Writincj Help 



NEED WRITING HELP? 

WE HELP YOU WRITE WHAT YOU WANT 
TO SAY! EXPERT EDITING! Theses, Dis- 
sertations, Essays, Personal Statements, 
Manuscripts. International students wel- 
come. 818-345-1531. 



NIGHT OWL 

Research, Editing, Writing. OPEN 24-7. 
Flnaal qucUity at reasonable rates. Interna- 
tional students welcome. Call Ron at 310- 
572-6500. 




Business Opportunities 



MY TEAM MAKES 
MONEY! 

Flexible, no products, no large investment 
You must be serious and motivated. Call Bill 
323-465-2313 {11am-7pm-Mon-Sat). 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT wanted for 
business and p>ersonal aftajrs. Please fax re- 
sume to Matthew Milter 310-440-0099. 



7500 

jjg^^ Career Opportunities 



COMMERCIAL LONG 
DISTANCE SALES 

Voice/data/T-1. Aggressive, established com- 
pany pays lifetime residuals on ALL accounts. 
Nationwide. Elephant hunters! MUST have tel- 
ecom experience. MCI crew welcome! Fax 
801-383-5919. 

ELEMENTARY TEACHING ASSISTANT 
needed. Westside scfK>ol, 3 hour (daily) posi- 
tion, must have completed 60 college units. 
Contact Loren@31 0-979-71 78. 



F/T & P/T Promotional 

Sales Associate 

Needed!!! 

Must be self-motivated & enthusiastic with a 
dynamic, outgoing personality. At least 1- 
year experience in retail sales. We offer 
healthy commissions in addition to an hour- 
ly wage, with positions available in 2 great 
locations in West LA. Submit resumes to 
mireille.dermer@vialtaHnc.com or fax 310- 
275-6188. 



FT LAB TECHS WANTED for Biotech compa- 
ny in WLA. Testing human plasmas. Fax re- 
sume to 310-996-1398 or email 
octiing@ngi.com. 

PROJECT ENGINEER- F/T position support- 
ing engineering executives and manage pro- 
jects. Please visit www.adept- 
group.net/job.html for detaMs and resume sub- 
mittal. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE EVALUATION FIRM 
seeks F/T research associate. Strorig ana- 
lytical&writing sitiHs. Graduate degree a 
must. $52,000. Fax resume 818-990-3103. 



7600 

Child Care Offered 



AFFORDABLE 
CHILD CARE 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL run by 
UCLA grads. Ages 2.5/6years. Two large play- 
yards. Open year-round 7:30-5:30. Close to 
UCLA. 310-473-0772. 

CHILD CARE OFFERED with excellent refer- 
erx^es and lots of love. Flexible. 310-657- 
4588. Can Judy. 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



FEMALE ASSISTANT TO WORK w/wonder- 
ful/sweet 14yr-old very physicailly disabled 
dancer/yogini. Duties include: helping w/yoga 
practice at home, assistirig in postures during 
Fri-night yoga classes, feeding meals, helping 
Mom, occasional babysitting, F>ossibly 
Inight/wk help w/food-prep/feedirig/kitchen- 
clean-up. Patience/loving-heart/mindful- 
nessZ&reliability needed. Call 310-396-8100. 

GOVERNESS/TUTOR 

LOOKING for reliat>le, smart, mature lady to 
wort( as a govemessAutor. Great environment. 
Great benefits. Must be able to travel all over 
the worid. Pay negotiable. 310-842-6226. 

NANNY/TUTOR 

Tues-Sat. Live-in or live-out. For 5-year-ok] in 
kindergarten. 310-472-6479. 

PICK UP CHILDREN 

NEEDED to pick-up twins from school/home. 
4-5pm. Great p>ay. Bonus/excellent pay If you 
know Hetjrew /Piano. Begins Septemt)er. 310- 
820-2000/31 0-429-01 23. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our cir- 
culars. For info call 203-977-1720. 

$300/DAY POTENTIAL 
BARTENDING 

Willtiain. Call:866-291 -1884x440. 

$6000-1- PER MONTH 

$5,000+permonth, Full-T1me/$1,500- 

2,000+per month Part-Time. Fortune500 com- 
pany kx>king for MOTIVATED people to publi- 
cize communk:atk>n servk^es. Flexit>le hours. 
310-407-1039. 



or 



« 



irtedr 



L«»kinf f«r all fyp«f, 

mow • mmawmodea • odbrs 

We olto have Plot size & Children div 
Fof prinJ & noo-union commercials 
No •xperiaoc* required No fees 



:^:l;^b:^;ii)T 

• Earn $100-$200 a day 

• 2 we«k training & Jot) 

Placemwn Included 

• ITS not a )ob -It's a PARTYIII 



National Bartenders School 



1 (800) 646 - MIXX (6499) 

www ii.iti<>M.ill>.-ii1oi)rlcM ji.c;oei-| 



A FRONT 
OFFICE ADMIN. 

FT/PT-Dependal)le multi-tasker for Westwood 
Real Estate Firm. Excellent salary, casual en- 
vironment. Fax resume: 310-470-6755. Call 
310-475-3251. 




7800 

Help Wiuttfifl 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASST Small penston firm. 
Analytical, bright energetic, organized, 
detailed Individual, math at>ility, 50wpm, 30- 
40hrs/Wk, $11-13/hr. Call Youn Mee 310-576- 
1030x12. 

ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION. Scheduling, 
typing, filing, ptK>nes and fee ooilectk>ns. Morv 
Thurs 4pm-8pm, and Fri 8;30am-2:30pm, 
hours not negotiable. Pay is DOE. Daniel Sa- 
lazar 310-479-8353. 

AFTERSCHOOL HELPER wanted for 3 chikl- 
ren in Padfk: Palisades Male/female. 10- 
15hrs/wk. Julie 310-729-5668. 

ANNOUNCERS, no experience necessary. 
Host music/talk-shows for our radk) statkxis. 
P/T. $10-15/hr, $200+per/show, pkis fantastk: 
benefits. 323-468-0080, 24-hours. 

ASSISTANT NEEDED 

Hourly + bonuses. 20hrs/week+. Flexible 
hours, will train. Good attitude a must. 310- 
234-1190. 

BARTENDING 

$250 A DAY POTENTIAL Training provided. 
1-800-293-3985 extS 10. 

CASH PAID DAILY 

$10-$15/HR. PT. Gay artist seeks totally 
clean-shaven male under 22 for figure model- 
ing etc. Inexperienced preferred. Danny@818- 
980-1666. 

CHAPERONE WANTED 

To house and transport 16 year-oM female in 
LA area. Mkt-July- Aug 31st, working in the 
Studk) City area. Transportatton arxl referenc- 
es required. 915-584-2865. 

CLERK: TIRED OF SCHOOL? BH Law Firm 
needs dependable dertcs. Experience ttie le- 
gal worid. 30hr/wk. $7.50/hr. Fax Resume to: 
310-274-2798. 

CUSTOMER SERVICE/SALES ASSOCIATE 
Great-student-job. P/T-Flexible hours. Hourly 
plus bonus. Computer skills/bilingual en espa- 
nol a plus. Westwood Village Insurance Agerv 
cy across from Rite-Akj. UCLA students wtw 
have finished FreshmarVSophmore year ontyf 
Call Pat:31 0-208-71 83 

DOCUMENT RETRIEVER 

To obtain artk:les from UCLA libraries. Must 
have computer w/scanner OR fax machine, 
kleal for someone who already has a need to 
be on the UCLA campus on a regular t>asis. 
Please email greg.ke8Sler@attbi.com or fax 
916-921-6923. 

F/T AAI. Data Collection/Entry/Z^nalysis. Assist 
in ttie collection of references. Cornpare data 
file analysis and study charts w/database er>- 
tries for accuracy. Fax resume 310-794-2864. 



FILE CLERK 



$8/hr. F/T and PfT, flexible hrs. Near West LA. 
Fax resume 323-938-5827. 

FT SRA I. Exp. in t>k>medical research, woi1( 
w/smail rodents. Conducting behavkxal arxl 
physk}k>gical experinrants to access anxiety 
arxl cok>rectal sensitivity. Assist in surgeries, 
tissue arxl bkxxj collections, arxl processing of 
samples for histotogy, immunohistoctiemistry, 
ELISA arxl RNA isolat»n. Administer drugs u»- 
ing several different routes including oral ga- 
vage and i.p. and s.c. injectk}n. Fax resume 
310-794-2864. 

GREAT WORKPLACE 

Prr Telemarketer for education publisher 
r)eeded. Hourly arxl good commissions. 
Momings(3-5 days/week). Krx>wledge of for- 
eign language helpful. 310-395-9393. 

HELP WANTED-POSSIBLE ROOMMATE. 
PART TIME PERMANENT REAL ESTATE AS- 
SISTANT/Light house work. References, 
Need Conciencious Person. Female pre- 
fen-ed. $650. 310-820-6059. 

LAYOUT: Garvey papers at UCLA seeks stud- 
ent for paginatkxi work using Adobe Fiame- 
Maker. 15/hrs/wk. Email resume to Igif- 
tord@isop.ucla.edu by 7/19. 

LIBRARY ASSISTANT 

FP Entry Level opportunity with industry lead- 
er. Dedicated, detail-oriented, deperxlablet 
person to access UCLA campus Ntxaries. Stay 
in shape while you wori(. Excellent pay. Email 
, resume to tdi@tdkx).com or fax 3102^^701. 

LIV HOME is hiring. ..Caregivers and oompan- 
k}ns for private duty. CNA's, CHHA's and 
Psych Techs erxx>uraged to apply. Req min 2 
years experience live-in. Live-out drivers 
w/own car. We offer excellent benefits. CaU 
Stafnng@323-933-5880. 

LIV HOME is kxjking for semi-retired arxl re- 
tired people to share your time w/eklers dis- 
cussing cunent arxl historical events, sharir>g 
vast life experierx^es, have a tove of tf>e arts. 
Have a volunteering spirit, but don't mind be- 
ing compensated. If this is you, please call re- 
garding our Lifestyle Association Program. 
Laura/Bridget 323-933-5880. 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

WEST WILSHIRE MEDICAL GROUP is a 
busy neurology medk:al office have the foNow- 
ing Full-Tune positions open for inwnediate 
conskleration. Front Desk, Physk»l Therapy 
Assistant, Physician's Assistant, ti-anscription- 
ist, Uttrasound technk:tan, X-ray tectKucian 
arxl rr>edk:^ biller Requirements, experierx:e 
necessary, muli-task person required, de- 
pendable, punctual, computer literate, arxl 
team player. Fax resume :31 0-479-4220, or 
email: asakx}® earthlink.net 

MODEL/ACTORS- Are you ready. ..or interest- 
ed in showtxz? TV episodes, fall print can>- 
paigns, commercials. 310-360-6992, 310-360- 
1 240. Beverty Hills. Serious irx^uiri^ only. 

MODELS WANTED by professwnai photo stu- 
dk) for upcoming assignments. MaJe/fennale, 
pro/non-pro. Call for an appt 818-986-7933. 

NEED WEB ARTIST 

Work around school schedule. P/T. Exciting 
position. Please call 818-779-1900. Talk to Mr. 
Marshall. 

NURSE, RN OR LVN for F/T physkaan in busy 
Beverly Hills demnatology office. References 
required. Diane 310-273-0467. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT 

WANTED for home/office near UCLA ft-om 1- 
5pm everyday. Must know how to use a PC, 
answer phones, have good people skills arxl 
references. $10/hr. 310-471-2029. leave a 
message. 

OFFICE GIRL NEEDED for simple computer 
stuff. Psych ma^r preferred. 5 miles from 
UCLA. lOhrs/week @ $10/hr. Call 310-273- 
4712. "^ 

OFFICER MANAGER. WiU ti-ain to manc^ of- 
fice. Computer knowledge. M-F. 30-40hrs/wk. 
Salary+Benefits. 310-476-4205. 



P/T COMPUTER ASSISTANT for Brent- 
wood Real Estate office. Excel, Word, Pow- 
erPoint, arxl other applk:ations. Salary ne- 
gotiable. Call 310-858-0360. 



4 



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4 
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Cliissifitifls 
825-2221 




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Display 
206-3060 



CU8SIFIED 



MONDAY, JULY 15, 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 



11 



F 



2300 

Sperm/ Eqci Donors 



2300 

Sperm/ Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/ Egg Donors 



2300 

Sperm/Egg Donors 



EGG DONOR NEEDED 









Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: 



Height Approximately 5'9 or Taller 



Caucasian 



S.A.T. Score Around 1250 or High A.C.T. 
College Student or Graduate Under 30 



No Genetic Medical Issues 



Paid to you and / or the chanty of your choice 

COMPENSATION $80,000 

All related expenses will be paid in addition to your 

compensation \ 



For more information or to obtain an application please 
contact Michelle at the Law Offices (800) 808-5838 or email 

EggDonorInfo@aol.com 




*This ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor bank. jJa 



Dont'Vall your parents 
for ^^Ktra cash. 

^^rtt IIS- 



If you're male, in college or 
have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
where you can earn up to 
$600 per month, call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
comprehensive health 
screening . Plus you can 
help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. So \i 
you're looking for a great 
job and little extra cash, 
call us first. 




ftejcibte hours 
minimal'time 
commitment 



310-824-9941 

or check out our website at 
http -.//ww^ . cry oban k . com/donors 



' Mi^SOO 

Help Wnnted 



PUBLISHING INTERN 

Responsible, energetic, writing and computer 
skills, knowledge of Page Maker helpful. Fast- 
growing motkxi picture and televiston direc- 
tory $7/hour. Hours negotiate. Contact Su- 
san Moore at Canoco Publishing, 310-471- 
2287. 

RESEARCH ASSISTANT 

To do Internet studies. Pari-tinie or full-time. 
Fax R«sunr>e to 310-450-1311. or E-mail: 
rg (9 pmsmarl . com . 

RETAIL SALES 

PT/FT. Sepu^eda Blvd. Designer wed- 
ding/evening gowns. Experier>ce preferred, 
motivated and frier>dly. Great opportunity. Sal- 
ary/commissions/bonuses. ExoeUent $$. 310- 
474-7808 Pauline. 

SECRETARY 

Haiftime, mornings, to RN at VA medk»l cen- 
ter, WLA. Proficient in word and excel. $11 /hr. 
Job starts 08/01/02 and ends 12/31/02. Fax 
resume to Susan Orrange. 310-268-4404. 

TEACHING ASSISTANT 

To work wrtfi 5-9 year olds. Hours are 745AM- 
1PM M-F. Begin late August. Fax resume to 
310-471-1532. 

TELEMARKETER for Fixed Wireless ISP 
Generate leads, ck>se sales, inform customers 
about products. Full-time, 12-8pm. Hourly $8- 
1$2. Telecom knowledge preferred. Email 
amy <9 speed band com. 




TELEMARKETING/SALES positbn for estab- 
lished telecom company. Market Broadt^and, 
data, voice service to businesses. Sal- 
ary+commisswn. Flexible hours. Near cam- 
pus. Fax resume 310-828-2288 or email 
bruce @ cyt)emetcom . com 



Actdrs/Ex!ras Wanted 



LCX)KING for male models for "workout" vkJ- 
eos. 16-23 y/o, muscular & well-defined. $$$. 
Contact Stella 310 ■'Pi-1660. 



7900 

Housesittiiig 



HOUSESITTER 

21 or okler male to occasionally housesit and 
keep track of high school senior. Up to 
2wks/time. Beverly Hills-10 min from campus. 
Pool/gym. Room-^board-fGenerous per diem. 
310-285-0902. 



TELEMARKETER 

TELEMARKETER NEEDED for a woman's 
ctothing company. 310-473-7454. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



PERM/KNENT POSITION Mon-Thurs 9am- 
4pm at UCLA Doctor s Office No health in- 
surance. Multi-taskA>usy oflio*. Filing/ 
phones/scheduling $l0/hr. PIMM Mnd re- 
sume fax;3 10-824-2781 



PERSONABLE FRONT DESK RECEPTION- 
IST: with some sales expenence for West Hol- 
lywood upscale gym Jantce;21 3-961 -4440. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY AIDE nMdad- Manhat- 
tan Beach. 30-35hrs. benefits available, out- 
patient orthopedic dinic Start dale July/Au- 
guk 2002. FAX resum es 310-378-2004 

POWERPOINT 

ASSISTANT for medical presentation Fax 
310-246-4902 



PRE-OPTOMETRY or Pre-med graduate 
students needed for dinicai assistant positk>n 
at Jules Stem Eye Institute Min GPA 3.5 
20linAvk 1-year min commitment Fax re- 
•ulne 310-267-2660 Attn: Regina or email 
nrMKtoontfiaei.ucla.edu 



Classifieds 
325-2221 



7800 

Help Wanted 



PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Westwood Vil- 
lage production company hinng student PA. 
Camera. Editing, Submissions, Errands. 
Clean driving record a must. UCLA Students 
>ttf\o have completed Freshman/Sophmore 
year only. CaM Patrick 3 10-208-7 183 

PROMOTIONS REPRESENTATIVE: Film ad- 
vertisir)g. Call retail stores for upcoming re- 
leases. Coordinate store visits Bilingual pre- 
ferred. P/T-F/T-8am-12pm or 12:30pm- 
4:30pnr>-flex.$9/hr-fbonus. 310-289-2194 

PT RECEPTIONIST 

LEGAL RECEPTIONIST/CLERK: Part-time 
2pm-€pm M-F Westwood Law Firm; Spanish 
speaking preferred, basic computer krrawl- 
edge. 310-446-0104 

PT RECEPTIONIST POSITION. Afternoons 
Century City Law Office $10/hr. Fax resume 
310-282-8117. 



TUTOR NEEDED FOR 9th-grader taking 
beginning Spanish or 12th-grader taking 
beginning chemistryAalgebra 2. lOmin from 
UCLA. Evenings. Nancy 310-476-4205. 

WAITRESS/WAITER 

Restaurant experience required. Must be fa- 
miliar wtth full American meruj and able to han- 
dle fast-paced environment. PT lunch shifts. 
Upscale Westwood Cafe Call David.p 10-473- 
5045. 



I 



8000 

Internships 



ENGINEERING INTERN- P/T position to ass- 
ist in project management arxj perform admin- 
istrative duties. Please visit wv^w.adept- 
group.net/job.html for details and resume sub- 
mittal. 

INTERN 

Aml)itk)us internet company seeks intem for 
data entry. Extremely flexible hours, 
work@home a possibility. Contact: David 310- 
569-6719. M«hael 310-869-5812. 

MUSIC AGENCY INTERNSHIP Database en- 
try arKJ Management. General Offk:e Duties. 
Looking for someone w/ strong work ethic, self 
motivation, good sense of style and humor. 
Please email resume: robertb® bullymu- 
sk:.com or fax to 310-481-3968. 



8300 

Volunteer 



VOLUNTEERING 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES available at 
youth hostel in Santa Monica. Meet intema- 
tk)nal travelers. Gam job skills. Lucy 310-393- 
9913x18. 



WANTED: 29 people to kise weight. Earn $$$ 
for tt>e pounds and irK^hes you lose. Safe. 
Doctor recommended. 800-296-0477 www.k>- 
selikemagic.com 

WANTED: MARKETING 
GURU 

Manage a marketing campaign, earn w/gener- 
ous commission, and work on your own 
schedule. For information, please visit 
www.gizmo-la.com/guenllamarketing. 



PT/FT/RESIDENTIAL INN KEEPER. Meet 
people from all over the world. Transporta- 
tk>n required. Melissa: 310-578-7880. $9- 
1 0/hr after Inn Keeper. 



t 



lease ■ 

recycle 

•r for Joe 



8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



1 BLOCK TO CAMPUS . Singles-$825, in- 
cludes utilities, 1bdrms-$1200. 2bdrms-$1350. 
Call 310-476-4165 or 310-824-2595. 

1 MIN TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD. Furnished. Single: 

$900/month. Carpeted. Gated complex. 
Quiet. Pool. Laundry, lyr lease. 310-824- 
1830. 

1 -MINUTE TO UCLA 

Studio, furnished, clean, security entrance, 
separate kitchen, laundry room, pool, lyr 
lease. $850/mo. 310-824-1830. 



IT/r 




for UCLA students with non-urgent health questioni^,^ 






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ucla Ashe Center 



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. /..-.il* 



ACROSS 

1 Splash out 
5 Stock option 
8 Make a profit 
12 Hopping mad 

14 Silent Saeen's 
Theda — 

15 " sorry!" 

16 Peace goddess 

1 7 Sty noise 

18 Happy tune 

19 Raider 

21 Blackboard 
accessory 

23 Mongrel 

24 Pooh's pal 

25 Sault — Mane 

26 Spread out 

30 Black eye, slanglly 

32 Oil jobs 

33 Amundsen's quest 
(2wds.) 

37 Bellicose deity 

38 Seminar 

39 Cornfield menace 

40 Distant relative (2 
wds.) 

42 Freak out (2 wds.) 

43 Loan figures 

44 Horn 

45 Alphabet starters 

48 Stripling 

49 Sweater letter 

50 Garden tool 
52 in one piece 

57 Scarlett's home 

58 TV actor Ken - 

60 Jazzman — Blake 

61 A Karamazov 

62 Tempest 

63 Buffak} puckster 

64 Young horse 

65 Noncom 
86 Pre-owned 

DOWN 

1 Lissome 

2 Turkish currency 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 




7-1502 



2002 Untied Feature Syndicate. Inc 



3 Done with 

4 — colada (rum 
drink) 

5 Two of a kind 

6 Coffee server 

7 Fast food orders 

8 Arizona river 

9 Faulty 

10 Cay 

1 1 — Dame, Ind 

13 Low cards 

14 South African 
settler 

20 Rop 

22 — Hashanah 

24 Shake awake 

26 Smelting 
residue 

27 Contented 
sound 

28 Busy as — — 

29 Actor — Romero 

30 Eerie sounds 

31 Orlando 
attraction 



33 Rshtailed 

34 Aloud 

35 Long easy stride 

36 Still-life subject 
38 Junk mail 

41 Fable 

42 Dwarfs 

44 "I knew Itr 

45 Top story 

46 Opera cheer 

47 Reef builder 
49 Glassmaker — 

Lalique 

51 Hunger for 

52 Rne sediment 

53 Hawaiian feast 

54 Wanes 

55 Male parent 

56 Watermelon 
leftover 

59 Fait behind 




8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



1380 VETERAN-1bdrm/1bth. $1395(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi. intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all appliances. Move-in 
ASAP. Pets considered. 310-477-5108. 



WESTWOOD 



Studios $1100-1200 

1 bedroom.S 1350- 1600 

Summer discount available. 
Call for details 

Parking Avallabte. 
Walking distance to campus. 

310-208-8505 



1380 VETERAN-2bdrm/2bth. $1795(neg). 
Park view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi. intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all appliances. Move-in 
ASAP. Pets considered. 310-477-5108. 



3BDRM-I-BTH 
WLAAJCLA 

Newer Santa Fe style. Front, comer unit. 
Stove/fridge/dishwasher/dining area. Fire- 
place. W/D in unit. Gated-parking. 4units. 
Available Sept 1st. Close to shop- 
ping+405+Barrington. $1795. 310-471- 
0359. 



BEV HILLS ADJ $1375 

MOVE IN SPECIAL! Large 2 bdrm/2ba. fire- 
place, MW. DW, gated, laundry. Available now. 
9025 Ateott 310-385-0092. 



8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



BEV HILLS Adj$1395up 

MOVE IN SPECIAL! Large 2bdmV2ba. fire- 
place, mw, D/w. Gated, laundry, available now 
& 8/1 . Call 31 0-376-8794. 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1 .2&3BEDROOM. 
$925&UP LARGE. UNUSUAL CHARM. 
SOME SPANISH STYLE W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS. ONLY HALF BLOCK TO PICO 
BUS. 310-839-6294. 

BRENTWOOD ADJACENT $1290. Cojy 
2t)edroom/1bath. 2-car tandem parking. Ctose 
to Wilshire/UCLA freeway Lease to 2. No 
Pets. 1333 Bany. 310-826-8461. 

BRENTWOOD ADJCNT $1195-$1775. 1- 
bdrms/2-bdrms/2-baths. Newly Decorated. 
Quiet building. Built-in/Bookcase/Center 
Light, w/view. X-Large. Patios&Parking, 
UCLA/1 0-min. No Pets. Faculaty/Staff/Grads. 
1-yr lease 310-453-5000. 310-238-2222. 

BRENTWOOD ONE BEDROOM LOWER and 
geirden setting. Huge patio, new kitchen, all 
appliances, fireplace, hardwood fkxxs. One 
year lease. No Pets. 11644 Montana Ave. 
Available June. $1500. Call: 310-410-1575. 

BRENTWOOD. 2BDRM/1Ba $1250. 
3drm/1ba $1650. carpet, refrigerator, washer 
and dryer inside buikjing. two car parking. 
11651 GorhamAve. Available 08/01. 3 10-476- 
0026. 310-666-0348. 

BRENTWOOD. Charming Ibdrm, R/S, car- 
pets, patio, large ck>sets. laundry, parking. 
$1025. 310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 
tals.com 

BRENTWOOD. Large Ibdnn, R/S, carpets. 
D/W, pool, laundry, parking, $1050. 310-395- 
RENT. www.westsiderentals.com 

BRENTWOOD. Lovely Ibdrm, carpets, 
balcony, R/S. parking, a must see! $995. 
310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 

tals.com * 



Display 
206-3060 



n 



WiMHY BRUIN • MONDAY. JULY 15, 2002 



ClASSIREO 



Apartnients for R»Mit 



8400 

Ap;iitineiits for Rent 



8AOO 

Apartments for Rent 




(310) 206-0064, 208-4868 



• Free T-1 Intemet aooeGS 

• Study Lcxjnge M#i computBTS 

• Fuly^qu^psd tliess oantor 

• Pod, sauna, spa & nBcreetton area 

• Heat/ AC. i B ^ gwa i u i. microwave, 

• Baioony or poto & firepleM 

• Studk). 1 & 2 Bedrooms 



Exceptional 



430KtikmA¥BL 

DSLRsKJy 

RocAcsp apa & rvcraeion area 

HeaC/AC.rBMgaralor, microMeve, 



Baloonyorpfllb&llrBplKB 
1 &2Bedroom8 



10307hm kMi A¥Bi 

•DSL ready 

* Futy^qUped l^was oenlBr 

• Rooltop sundeck & nBcreoHon area 

• Sauna, outdoor 9pa & bartecue 

•Haat/AC.rsMBenior, 
stove, cMiMHhar 

* Baloony tioy \Mndowv, flreplaoea 
*Stu(lo/^]tB.Only 



BRENTWOOD. MkMlM ITom UCLA, luxurtous 
Ngh-rtM wMalum >pp o < m ii>wi te arKl braath- 
taMng vtawt. Otympic ttn pool and nmv fft- 
rtMt o«nl»r Apartmanla ftom $120(ymonth 
Damngton Plaza 3 10-478-3000. 

BREffTWOOO: $1550. 2bdrnV2blh. balcony! 
rafrigarator/ttova. carpat/drapaa. parking, 
tauftdry. no pata. naar UCLA, by i »)pu iiiiria< H 
11728 MayftakJ. Cal310-»4-4122. 310-271- 
8811 



Casablanca West 



Bedrooms from 
^ BachelcNTS ! , 

Avalfabte July 1^ 



530Veter? 
208-4394 



1 



BR6^frwOOO: 4bdmH<Jan. 3 ful balha. Rr»- 
piaoe. hardwood floora. fuly-aquippad Idlchan. 
Idaai tor sharing. Avaiiabia July, lyr iaMa. No 
$3400 310-410-1575 



I CASA OPHIR 

iBDRMnBTH alarling $1250. 2t>drm/2tth 
$2100. Luxury apartmanis, fiva minula 
wttk to UCLA Fhdga. diahwaahar. 
mi wm w a xa. laundry room, parking. bakx>ny. 
NO PETS. 11088 Ophlr. Effc:310-208- 
1. 



CULVER CrTY. Larga Ibdmi: $900Anonth. 
yaar laaaa. Smgla: $60QAnonlh. yaiv iaaaa. 
C^ W^ 31O420-7884. 

ESCAPE TO THE SEA 

Marln a -dat-Ray. SmaH fumiihad aaftoaL Cool 
ocaan braazaa. Safa^aacaM. kAartna Raat- 

roorea 150fl. away. Talaphorw capab4ltty 
$4S0^tw. 310-358-8316. 

GUESTHOUSE 

In beauHfui Waal wood homa. Studto w/M 



toft. Unfumiihad. $11S0An(h inckidk>g li utH- 
Maa arvl pramium cabla. AvaNabla immadMa- 
h^Summar or lyaar laaaa ok. Cal:310-474- 
2706. 

HUQE 380RI^4/2BTVI with a hug patto with a 
dly viaw. Apt haa baan totaty upgradad. 
Mnutos to achooL Opan houaa dai^ lOwn- 
5pm. Locatad at 10801 Roaa Ava. 
$2ia0Anonlh. (M 310-728-0033. Aak ^xxjt 
our mova-in ipadal. 

LUXURY APTS. 1&2badrooms. Nawty ran^ 
valai. W aa tw o o d . Hardwood floort, crown 
moklnga. tota of light Will conaklar pat. 
AC/naw applancas. $1490-2640. 310-475- 
9311. 



WE/IWOOD VILL4CE 
691 LEVERING AVENUE 

oocupQTKv Controtod ocohb. oounyofd 

buUdlog uil(^ pool. ■laiiatiM. subcanorwor 

pofWng Buik-tn Wtdwns. lorgs patiM or 

boloonMs Soma opportmants tMlt^ o nmQkxm 

IIBR/lbath $1,300 

2Bf^1 bath ^ $1 .800 

2Bf^balh $2,300 

For pra-appiicattons visit us at 

www.l«v«r1nghaights.com 
(310) 208-3647 



MARINA MOVE-IN 
SPECIAL 

Spacious naw studtoa- 1,2.3bdrm8. T-l Intar- 
nal. j Mdga. microwava, A/C, 

pooVipa/gym/inuna. businsas oantar, con- 
ciarga. Chalaau IMwtna^ VHm. 310-627- 
3002. 

MINUTES FROM UCLA 

PRIME LOCATION: Waatwood/Brantwood ad- 
jacanl. iBadroom $1095&up, 2bedroom 
$1295^. 3badroom $2150 and up Ready for 
movann now. Laundry. Soma gatad Wisaman 
310474-1111. 



MIRACLE MILE-24-yaar-oW famala alum 
tootong to shwa a baautiful, huga 2bdrm/2ba 
^Mtftmant w/famala grad-studant. 3rd straat 
batwaan Fairfax/U Braa. Nawty ra m odaiad 
Mtchan. Qym/jpool. aarobto«Voga Waking 
dMwva to shopping. $79eAno. 323-571- 
4107. 

NEAR UCLAI 2bdrm/1 .5bth. Freshly 
painted, naw carpets, new ceramic tiles 
in kjtchen/dinning room 1 -year-lease. 
$1500/month Available end of July. 310- 
473-9916. 

NEAR UCLA LARGE 1BDRM In 2bdrm. 
Available now. Looicmg for roommate(s). 
$1000/mo or $500/mo/person Call: 
Sharone 213-216-6519. Ron: 818-422- 
4993!^ 



NEAR UCLA. Spanish Miaawn Buikling. Sin- 
gle: $750/month. year ieaae. Juntor ibdrm: 
$82SAnonth. yaar laaaa. Cal Baity ,ii0-479- 
8646 





ntns 



COFFEE TABLE 



COMfnjTER DESK 



woo den legs & glass tabHetoo $30 



COUCH 



_wt)fte 

excellent condition 



DINING ROOM SET 



tabie-»4 chairs-t-xtFEB 



DVD PALER 



ENTERTAINMENT CTR 



detta 1000 dvd/svcd 
intxnt 



Price Phone 

310-271-4961 

Mip-990-8969 

310-824-2882 

626-272-3354 

_6J»-272-3354 

J!0:124-2882 

Jip-443-9751 

310-208-8857 

3 10-824-28 82 

310-486-5493 

626-272-3354 



$30 



$100 



$100 



m_ 



FAX Ta COPY 



-t^ 



FULL MAH&FRAME&DRS 



excel , conditio n 

incdrwrematchdresser 



m. 



GLASS FOR DINING TABLE rounded comers 42"x42" 



$150 



GUCq SUNGUSS CAS E 
IKEA WHITE TABLE 



black leather, new 



^0. 



^ 



appf DX.24 "x40'' 



LEATHER SOfA 



.^0^ 



t)lue-good condtdon 



PALMS Single apt from $600. 1-bdmi $700, 
$600/$700dapoait 1-yaar lease. Stove, re- 
fiig. carpets, vart. bHnda. 31 0-837- 1S02 LM. 
8am-5pm. 

PRIME AREA. 8580 Gregory Wky. Beverly 
Hills Adj Completely rantodeled. Pnvate, 
bright, and spackxjs. Great view. 2bdmV1bih 
w^Mtoony. to 4-plax. A/C. oeiNng tana, slova. 
refrigerator, laundry f a c lMss. WKJ parWno tor 3 
cart. No pata. $1800. 310-289-1089. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED from September in a 
2bdrm apartment. 512 Veteran Ave $475- 
$575 Cal Managar:31 0-208-2655 

SANTA MONICA PANORAMIC OCEAN- 
VIEW. Ibdrm fumiahed i«)artment $2000- 
$2300. Luxury 2-fl bedroom, fum^e^e:; $3500. 
Aasignad parking. Wak to 3rd Street Proma- 
nada&Pier. 310-399-3472. 

SANTA MONCA. Channing Ibdrm/R/S. car- 
pets near SMC. parking, flex ieaae, $875. 
310-396-REI^ www.waetTif1ersntrti.com 



APARTMENT 



•oserf on! Areo Amenify. 
• of Bedrooms Price, Pet 

9,000> 
n# Vacancies * 

Apartments. Condos. Duplexes, 
Houses, O.OOO^ Photos M, Virtiiail 
K- Walk ThrougKs 

90 Day Web Acc«ss! 

• FRK 



• FREf - •' '■■:_,■ 

• FREI - . 

wwiwr. op off n i e ii mu tite i i .conn 

310-276-HOME 201 N. Robertson 

t (466o Blvd. Beverly Hills 

tttndfofds List For fro^f 



SANTAMONICA. Cozy Ibdnn. R/S. hardwood 
ftoors. large ctoeets. yard, porch. pMiking. 
$1050. 310-395-RENT www.westsioeren- 
tala.oom 

SANTA MONICA. Large 

2bdmrHden<3bdrm)/2bth Firepiaoa/dtehwaah- 
er/gaiadiMtking. $3800. 1 buikling to Ocaan. 
f>tofth of Montana. Up to 6students. One-year- 
lease. No pets. 310-990-9534. 



SANTA MONICA Single. $895. Quiet building 
Ctoaa to markat^Mis. 1234 I4th street off 
Wiehire. 5 mUee from U CLA. 310-471-7073. 

SANTA MONICA. VERY LARGE 2bdnn/1bth. 
$1800. Quiet buikling, 2-par1dng, pnvate bal- 
cony. Ctoaa to markat^Mja. 1234 uth street. 
oflWIrtilre. 31O-471-7073. 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 
No Pets 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Glenrock 



* PALMS * 



2BO. 2BA TOWNHOME. FP, CEKTRAL, AJR/ 
HEAT, QATED QARAQE, SEC ALARM. CAT OK 

3614 FAfUS cm. t1296/MO 

ON-SITE W3H. (310)837-0906 

480. aSA ♦ LOFT TOWNHOME. FP. CENTRAL 

AIR/HEAT. QATEO OARAGE, SEC ALARM. 

CAT OK 

3640 WE8TWOOO BLVD. t23a6/MO 

3670 MIOVALE AVE. t23e6i/MO 



* MAR VISTA * 



aeO. 3BA TOWNHOME. FP. CENTRAL. AIR/ 
HEAT. OATEO OARAGE. SEC ALARM. CAT OK 



12741 MrrCHEU. AVE. 



$16e6/MO 



2BD4-2BA TOWNHOMES 

11931 AVOH WAY. $1245A40 

11748 COURTLEIGH OR $1245/M0 

1 2741 MITCHEU AVE $i 245/MO 

12736 CASWEli AVE $1245/MO. 






Open House Mon-Sat 10-4 
(310)301-1076 



PM 



com 



SHERMAN OAKS ADJ 

$795-$850 Ibdrm. Garden apts Phme res«- 
dantiai area. ceilir>g fans. A/C, appiiar>ces, 
parking, half-btock from IXLA's bua/shopping. 
818-309-9810 



SPECTACULAR 

WESTWOOD 

APT!!! 

MOVE IN ASAP!!! 

NOW!!! 

LARGE 2bdnn/2bth c^ with bakx)ny. Sun- 
ny, bright. Walk-in ctoaals. Rooftop Jacuzzi 
and pool. 2 parking spaoaa. W/D, stove. 
frkJge. 1 btock from WIshira Center campus 
ahuMa and Borders. Realy convenient for 
akJdams. Quiet and cute. $2100. 1-year- 
laaaa. Dont miaa out- CaN nowill 310-839- 
2623 Of 310-442-9224 for more into. Or 
email wer>dii(a9ucia.edu 



TWO ROOMS FOR RENT Availabto now. 
$500 each. Shared cable. Short term ok. de- 
posit Westwood/WLA. 310-474-2194. 



Dlamoiicl Head 
Apartments 

Roervc Apartment tar next achocX year 

Kent ftvts Aiy 1- 

Slr>glc $104 5 

SInqlc w/loft & 
1 bedroom $1265-1395 

Sbcdroom A 1 bedroorn 
w/Toft il 7 55 

Sbedroom vv/lofl $fi1 75 

wimin walUnj <M«t«nc« to UCLA. a«t«d 
P«rktn«, Jacuzzi, S«un«, t«c room. 

Laundry f«cinti««, Ac/Kofnscrator, Sto»^«. 
Short term avail. Summer dtacount 

660 Veteran 
208-2251 



W.HLYWD $1025 Single 

Firel. gated, aprking. avajtat>le 08/01. 1156 
Haoenda. 323-822-0542. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD 2bdrm/lbth, or 1bdrm-«Jen. 
$1650. $1750 and $1850. Beautiful Haidwood 
Ftoor/Carpets. Stove, Refrigerator. Rant in- 
dudes paJking. Laundry Room. 310-824-2112. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD. Ibdrm/lbth. Beautiful hard- 
wood ftoors, carpet, parking, stove, refrigera- 
tor, laundry room. $1300 & $1400. 310^4- 
2112. 



WALK TO UCLA, 
WESTWOOD 

SINGLE($1095+). U1($1350+). 

2+1 ($1950+), 2+2($2390 +) parking, pool, 
fireplace, walk-in ctoset, laundry, recreatton 
room, Jacuzzi, www.keltontowers.com 310- 
208-1976 



WEST LA 

ibdrm/lbath. dinir>g room, livir^g room, ga- 
rage, breakfast nook, gardener provided, 
backyard Duplex unit. 4mi to UCLA. $875. 
310-228-9097 



WEST LA ADJ to Brentwood. Large 
2txlrm/2bth upper. New carpets, blinds, 
D/W, stove. Quiet buikling, no pets. $1595. 
310-479-2307. 



WEST LA. $1500. Huge, bright front, 
3bdnn/1.5 ba. Completely remodeled, dish- 
washer, patio, 2 car parking, near UCLA. No 
pata. 310-670-5119. 

WEST LA. ibdrni. $1050. Ctose to bus, mar- 
kets, UCl-A. 1242 Barry, just off Wibhire. 
Available 9/11. 1 -year-lease, no pets. 310- 
471-7073. 



WEST 1-A. Ibdrms starting at $825. 2bdrms 
starting at $1150 And 3bdrm house $3200. 
Can tor details. Superlative Reality 310-391- 
1557. 



WEST l>. Cozy bachetor pad, frkJge, hard- 
wood ftoors, microwave, wet bar, pfi^ng, 
$625 www.westsiderentals.com 310-395- 
RENT. 



WESTWOOD APARTMENT, Ibdnn/lba, utili- 
ties inckxled, pool & laundry. Nice, dean & 
quiet. July or August tease $1l00/mo, lyr 
lease. 310-208-3797. 



WESTWOOD SUBLET 

WITH OPTION TO LEASE Move in ASAP 
Price-negotiable 1 bed/1 ba. Ctose, Clean, 
Quiet. Must See! Call for info: 310-312- 
1027. 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE, MIDVALE N. OF 
LEVERING LARGE 1 AND 2BDRM APTS, 
GARDEN VIEW. DINING ROOM, UNIQUE, 
CHARM. FRONT&REAR ENTRANCE UP- 
PER, ALSO LOWER APT W/HARDWOOD 
FLOORS+PATIO. 310-839-6294. 



La OAK DRESSER 



n/a 



$100 



310-429-9924 
310-271-4961 
310-80 1-5573 
31 0-271-49 61 
310-899-1421 
310-210-6840 
310-208-7396 



LOUNGE CHAIR 



MAC PRINTE R 

MAC-POWERBOOK 
MAGNAI^OX 



foot re st new, cf eam. otw 
J5 Inkjet 



$60 310-207-1232 

$60 310-210- 6840 



perfect concMtlon 



MATTRESS 



brand new mpS^^lvd Diaver 



$40 310-429-9924 

$450 310-278-1272 



$130 



twin 



310-202-9233 



MICROVMAVE 



daewogwtiltB 



.^0. 



MOTORCYCLE HaMET 



i40. 



MP3 PLAYER 



nen nolan fun-face. sHver 



READERS 



ttomond f1o600. new 



175. 



iZO. 



REFRfOGCTATOR 



oomm197n. 100.orm70 



310-824-2882 

310-429-9924 

JL10-31 2:2465 

626-272-3354 



$15 



ROLLER BLADES 



4.2cuft -t-freezef. like new 



310-204-3404 



K2&bauer sizes 7&8 



$100 



310-365-6529 



SAMSONITE SUITCASE 



SCOOTER NEW IN BOX 



w/wtieels. t)lack. 6nK)so M 



SINGLE BED 



foHJtn g lightweigm 



$35 310-312-2 465 

$20 310-899 -1421 



$20 



SPACESAVER 



matt twx. spring, & stand 



310-271-4961 



SUTTCASE 



toft bed/desk, obo 



1«L 



310-479-2307 



four piece set 



$100 



310-442-6438 



T-SHIRTS 



all sizes 



^^ 



310-31 2-2465 



TALL WOOD snap 



n/a 



TV-VCR 



TV 



13" w/remote. obo 



$1.25ea 310-312-2465 
$10 310-207-1232 



13 inch 



J40. 



310-210-6840 



TWIN BED 



$79 



310-429-9924 



TWIN BED 



box, frame, ofttwpedic. OBO $50 



TYPEWRITER PORTABLE 
WOOD DESK 



w/3 compartments & matt 



310-210-6840 



$100 



310-899-1421 



noneiectric1'x1'x4" 
w/drawers 



.^0. 



310-271-4961 



WOODEN DESK 



WORD PROCESSORAYPE 
ZENITH TV 



flat tibletDpMsteel legs 



.^0_ 



310-207-1232 



.^Q_ 



310-443-9751 



portable electric 



2yrsold,27" 



m. 



$100 



310-271-4961 
310-899-1421 



•Ad must be submitted in peison or by mail. No phone otdere allowBd. Deadline is I woric day prior to issue all 2pm. Bniin Bargains appear every Wednesday and 
Friday. Limit erf 4 free ads per customer per wedt. We resen« the right to revise or rejed any advertisement not meeting the standards of the Daily B^ 

N/A for price is disallowed 

The Daily Bmin does not authenticate, endorse, or verify the quality of the products advertised with the Bniin Bargaim. In addition, the Daily Bniin is not 

responsible for transactions in association with the items being sold. The ASUCLA Communications Board fully supports the Univereity of Califomias policy on 

nondiscrimination. The student media resenes the right to reject or modify the advertising whose content discriminates on the basis of ancestory, colot national 

origia race, religion, disability, age, sex, or sexual orientation. 



8/kOO 

Aparlnients for Rent 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE. Ibdrms $1300- 
$1500. 2bdnns $1800-2250. 1-yr lease. Park- 
ing, laundry. No pets. 310-471-7073. 

WESTWOOD VILLAGE. Fumiahed bachelor. 
Refrigerator, hot plate. $795. All utilities paid. 
No parking. Available 9/24. 10990 Strathmore. 
310471-7073. 



Apartments for Rent 



WESTWOOD. Lovely Ibdnn, pet OK. hard- 
wfood fkxxs, large closets, laundry, parking. 
$1100. 310-395-RENT. www.westsideren- 
tals.com 



BRENT MANOR ' 
APTS 

Avoid Westwood rents 
1 mile to UCLA 

Singles 

1&2 Bedrooms 

Pool, Near bus line 

No pets 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshire Blvd. 

L (310) 477-7237 J 



WESTWOOD. Ready to move-in. Huge 
2bdrm/2 fuH bath, top fkx>r, private. UTILI- 
TIES PAID. Fridge, stove, dishwasher, fire- 
place, walk-in ck>set. carpeted, bakxKiy, 3- 
car parking. Pets OK. $1690/month. 310- 
470^740. 



WESTWOOD. Spacious Ibdrm. Stove, refrig- 
erator, carpets, drapes. Airy, comer apt Park- 
ing, laundry, near IXLA. $1250. 11097 Strath- 
more. 31 0-454-«21 1 . 



2BD+2BA $13f5.00 
GATH) GARAGE INTERCOM BfTRYM UNIT 
2884SAWTai£ BLVD 
(3IO)391-107i 

Milltw: (310)490-4109 

www.wttt»M»ylBc»».ce« 



8500 

Apartments Furnished 



WESTWOOD. SPACIOUS 2BDRM/1 5Ba 
townfxxne apartment. New ki(cf)er\/carpeting. 
Plantatk>n shutters on windows. Cover park- 
ing. Pets ok. lyr lease. $1845/mo. 310-441- 
1720. 



8600 

Condo/Townhoiise for Rent 



1540 ARMACOSTFEMALE ROOMMATE to 
Share spacious 2bdrm/2.5ba condo. Fur- 
nished, washer/dryer, gated parking. $975/nio 
■»-half Utilities. 310-457-5523. 

BRENTWOOD. Townhouse, cat OK. stove, 
hardwood fk)ors. patk), D/V, MC, laundry, 
parking, $1775. 310-395-RENT. www.westskJ- 
erental8.com 



WESTWOOD. $1450Mio. Ibdnn/lbth, bal- 
cony. All utilities included. Great buikling 
w/pool. spa. gym, dub room. Ck>se to 
iJCLA, shops, park. 310-478-6246. 



«^ 



\, 



^ 



Westwood Village 

433 Kelton Ave. 
(310) 208-8685 

1 Bedroom from $1235 

Extra large luxury units include: 

• Fully equipped kitchen 

• Central heating and air 

• Extra closet space 

• Wett)ar in selected units 

• Private balcony 

• Intercom entry & gated parking 

'with 1 year lease 

Professionally managed by 

Integrated Property Services, Inc 



^ 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE: Large IbdmrVlbth 
Townhouse. $1600. Hardwood fkx>rs. fire- 
place, dinirtg room, parking, laundry, lyr lease. 
Available 8/15/02. No pets. 925 Gayley. 310- 
471-7073. 



BF 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Large, Clean 
Singles <& 1 Bedrooms 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

Near Le Conte 

No Pets 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



Tb 



id 



WESTWOOD. Ibdrm. Stove, refrigerator, 
drapes, hardwood ftoors. Upper, comer apt. 
Parkirig, laundry room, small quiet buiWing. 
$925. 1387 Midvaie. 310-454-8211. 



WESTWOOD. 2BDRM/2BATH. $1450 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN. STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM, HIGH CEILING. CHARM. 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE. SOME W/BALCONY. 
310-839-6294. 



WESTWOOD. Walk UCLA. 2bdnn/2bth. gated 
parking, rooftop spa, quiet buikling, accepting 
reservattons for Summer/Fall. $1995 and up. 
512 Veteran. 310-208-2655. 

WESTWOOD: Large 2bdnn/2bth. Walk to 
UCLA. 2 parking spots. Pool arxl jacu2Zi. 
Starting July. $1800-$ 1900. 310-824-0833 

WLA$1445&UP 

MOVE IN SPECIAL! LARGE 2 BDRM/2BA, 
fireplace, gated, laundry. Available :07/01. 
2437 Corinth. 310-477-1120. 

WLA/PALMS: Single for $750 (has beemed- 
ceilings), Ibdrm for $950. Close to 
UCLA/shopping. Refrigerator, stove, ctosets. 
Pool. 310-204-4332, ask for Shiriey 

WLA:$710&up. Move-in special. Attractive sin- 
gles. Near UCI-A/VA. kjeal for student. Suit- 
able for two. Definite must see! 1525 Sawtelle 
Blvd. 310-477-4832. 



Aparlnieiits to Share 



BEAUTIFUL APT 

WEST LA. $725. 3.5 miles to UCLA. Own bed- 
room w/walk-in ctoset and bathnx>m. Batoony, 
hot-tub. Secure, quiet, dean tHjitoing and 
parking. Share full kitchen, ample storage, 
large living/dining space, and 2 plione lines 
w/1 person. $725/month arid worth it. Avail- 
able Aug 1st 2002. 310-312-8704. 

BRENTWOOD 2BDRM/2BTH LUXURY 
CONDO btocks from UCLA. Washer/dryer, 
gym, pool, cableTV, hardwood floors. 
$1100/month plus 1/2 utilities. 310-476-1395. 

HEART OF BRENTWOOD: Roommate want- 
ed. Female. Sunny/charming 2bdrm/2bth 
w/bateony+front patio. Spacious living-room, 
fireplace, kitchen. Parking Included. $700/mth. 
310-471-9549 leave message. 

PALMS: PrivateRoom/Bath 2-«-2 apt to sublet 
for 9-month- 1 -year. Available Aug 1st. No 
smoking/drinking/drugs/pets/parties. 
$600/month. Male/female graduate student 
preferred. 310-841-5160, specialfriendk® hot- 
mail. com 

WEST HOLLYWOOD. IbdmVshare bath in 
2txlrm apt. Laurel Ave between Santa Monica 
arxl Fountain. $665/month+one-month securi- 
ty. Available Aug 1st. Non-smoker. Female 
preferred. Adorable space. 50 's courtyard- 
style. 310-922-6749. 

WESTWOOD. Looking for 102 guys to share 
2bdrm/2bth for 02/03 school year. 
$450/month. Call Danny 818-340-3266. 



WESTWOOD. $2500/month. 

2t)drm+derV3txlmi, 2t)th. Comer unit. Pool, 
spa, gym. 3 bakxxiies. Ctose to UCLA, 
shops, pari(. 310-478-6246. 



WETS LA. Spactous Guesthouse. R/S, car- 
pets, large ctosets, yard, parking, $950. 310- 
395-RENT. www.westsklerentals.com 

WILSHIRE CORRIDOR 

WESTWOOD. Ibdnrn- den/2bath, 10th ftoor, 
view, 24hrs security, 2 car garage. $1950/mo. 
310-475-7533, evening: 310-659-4834. 



8700 

Condo/Townhoiise for Sale 



CONDO FOR SALE 

SHERMAN OAKS. 2-^2 CONDO by own- 
er, spacious, many closets, 2-parking 
spaces, near Beverly Glen, $300,000. 
Move-in condition. 81 8-789-3596. 

IMAGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Conidor/Hi- 
Rise single, 1or2bdmi $150K-$325K. Walk to- 
UCLA/Vlllage, 24hr/security. Spectacular 
views, pool, spa, sauna, valet-servtoe. Agent- 
Bob 31 0-478-1 835ext. 109. 



WESTWOOD on Veteran. Ibdnn/lbth. 
Large private patto, hardwood ftoors, MC, 
W/D in unit. $259,000. Pool, spa, and gym. 
Myron 310-454-9493. 



WESTWOOD WILSHIRE 
CORRIDOR 

Luxury Hi-Rise Condo. 17th ftoor. Sweeping 
views. 1 large master suite w/his&her baths -»■ 
office area. Move-in condition. $669,000. 310- 
777-6371, Jane agent. 



8800 

Guesthouse for Rent 



SANTA MONICA. Guesthouse by beach, 
hardwood floors, large closets, laundry, 
parking, $850. 310-395-RENT. 

www.westsiderentals.com 

WESTWOOD. Furnished guesthouse. 
R/S. carpets. W/D, TV, VCR, parking, util- 
ities-fcable included. 310-395-RENT. 
www.westsiderentals.com 



Classifieds 
825-2221 






Display 
206-3060 



(iuiRONEZ 



SPORTS 



MONDAY. JULY 15. 2002 • THE DAILY BRUIN 



13 



Coaches' use of all players on roster irrational 



from page % 



in the country, a tie would deter- 
mine nothing. Fans want to see 
which team is really the best, not 
have nothing decided at the end. 

4) Baseball - May 24, 2002. USC 
6, UCLA 4 (12 innings) 

]Unlike the MLB All-Star game 
where each team used 10 pitchers 
each in 1 1 innings, the Bruins and 
TVojans used two pitchers each. 

The MLB All-Star game used to 
be a big rivalry game between the 
American League and National 



League, where both teams badly 
wanted to beat the other. They 
would k€»ep the best players avail- 
able playing at all times. 

In the UCLA-USC rivalry, the 
same thing was done. USC's Brett 
Bannister pitched six innings of 
relief, unheard of in the miyor 
leagues. Even Bruin Doug Silva's 
four innings of relief was unheard 
of. 

A normal baseball roster con- 
tains 25 players. E^h All-Star ros- 
ter had 30 players. In a normal 
game, all 25 players are never used. 



In the All-Star game, all 30 players 
on each team were used. 

Brenly and Torre claimed they 
were forced to use all their players. 
When did this happen? I'm sure 
baseball fans wouldn't care if 
Randy Winn, Roy Halladay, Jose 
Hernandez and Vicente Padilla did- 
n't get into the game. 

Also, in a real game, if a team 
were to ever run out of pitchers, 



they would have to use one of their 
other players to pitch. Most base- 
ball fans, myself included, would 
have loved to see Rcbin Ventura 
pitch against Junior Spivey instead 
of a tie. 

There is no rational explanation 
to defend this atrocity. Selig just 
gave baseball fans one more reason 
to hate him. The list of reasons 
never stops growing. 



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loors, yvd. paiKing. $1200 310-305-REFfr. 
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PALMS 3bdrm/1bth charming house 
$l950/month. Large yard, firepiace. garage, 
naar bUje-ltr>e 3700 Weatwood 949-581- 

eeeo. 

SANTA MONICA Charming Houaa, R/S. car- 
pals. W/D hookup, ywd, parWng. $1600. 310- 
395-RENT. www.wfHidarantalii.com 



SANTA MONICA Duplex. R/S. hardwood 
floors, deck, ckwat to baach. parldng. $1300 
310-395-RENT. www.waaMdaranMs.com 

WESTWOOD. Triplex. R/S. hardwood floofs. 
patk). D/W. laundry, garage, $1400. 310-396- 
RENT. www.waatiidarantals rofD 



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9^00 

Room for Rjmi! 



PALMS- 1 private bedroom, shared bath- 
room, private W/D, new, never lived in 
townhome, early August. $875/mo. Flex 
lease. Larry 310-860-8727. 

PALMS/WLA PrMtfa master bdrm/ba. 2-»-2. 
FuM kMchen large ctoaat. gatad-partung, balco- 
ny, Rraplaoe. Female grad studentlxofessiorv 
al pr a tarrad. $680/mo+uttlttaa. Aug 3rd. 310- 
559-7154. 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH In beautiful 
home near UCLA: furnished, kitchen, 
laundry privileges, utilities, cable includ- 
ed. Responsible male student preferred. 
References necessary. $650/mth 310- 
477-6977. Car necessary. 

ROOM FOR RENT in Beverly Hills. Pri- 
vate enterance, full bath, refrigerator, hot 
plate, Doheny and Wilshire. $675. 310- 
273-6639 



Room foi Rent 



TRY SOMETHING NEW IN FAU 20021 
Rooms available in friendly boarding house 
on Hllgard Ave. $798/month (2/room); 
$705.50/month (3/room); $682/month 
(5/room) includes uttNttaa. cable TV, and 15 
meals/week Femala UCLA students only. 
310-208-5056 



2 ROOMS & BATH SUITE in large, private 
home. Share kitchen, yard, etc Utilities 
pakJ, refererKes required $850/month. 
West LA. 310-478-5860 



BEDROOM PLUS Of FICE&BATH for female 
in Rancho Park near Weatwood. Kitchen, 
parWr^g. no pets/smoking Owners own 2 
calaAlog $800Ano 310-474-8912. 

BRENTWOOD Attractive, qmet home. Fur- 
nished, huge private bath. Wood fkxxs. Cable, 
fridge/microwava. i.5milas UCLA Naar bus 
AvaiUyjIe Aug l8t. 310472-4419 

GARDEN STUDIO ROOM & bath in private 
Brentwood home. Stone Fireplace. Rustk; 
Quiet. For responsibia poet-gr«l rna<« 9'^^ 
who Hkes dogs. Ralarancas Please $700/mo. 
310472-0042 



ROOM FOR RENT 

SANTA MONICA. Private room/ba. Fe- 
male quiet but fun. Near 3rd street Prom- 
enade. Laundry security building and 
side-by-side parking. $750/mo. Karl. 310- 
451-9284. 

ROOMS FOR FEMALE UCLA STUDENTS in 
quiet/courteous boarding house across UCLA. 
Rataa start at $500/month utilities/breakfast 
indudad. 310-206-6931. 

SUMMER SUBLET L«wlfair/Mldvaia Shvad 
room, $450/rTKxith negotiable, free parking. 
Available nofi. Some utilities pakJ. Roomrrute 
gorw most of sunvner. Melita. 818-618-5444 



TWO BEDROOMS TO RENT Share one bath. 
Separate staircase. Lovely home imile from 
campus to walk or rkle. Each bedroom $550. 
Upperdivisk>n or Grad students 310-476- 
5044. 

WESTWOOD I 

VERY SPACIOUS ATTRACTIVE 

2BDRM-^DEN Upper Quiet reskjeniai street. 
Laundry, parking, $2400 AvailiMa, Mkj Au- 
gust 310-234-8278 | 

WESTWOOD. quiet, dean room m house, 1/2 
mie to campus, hardwood fkx>r Cypriot en- 
trance available. 1-2 persons. $600- $900 310- 
772^8685. 

WESTWOOD Professk>nal/student to share 
large 3txlrm duplex. Bakxmy, fireplace, dish- 
washer, washer/dryer. Excellent location. 
$700mith 310477-8922. 

WILSHIRE/FAIRFAX/ 
PARK LA BREA 

Furnished. Lovely spacious room. Private 
bath. Indudaa uMMiea, refrigerator, mferowave, 
lOOfTV) CharvMis. Gated community with se- 
curity patrol. Parking. Overlooks oourtyard. 
Very quiet 24 hours. Safest kx:atk>n in LA. De- 
sire mature profestonal woman 30-*-. $675/mo. 
Available July 21st. CaU Mrs. Diamond at 323- 
939-2772. 



9500 

Roommates -Private Room 



BRENTWOOD, LARGE SUNNY Private 
room/bath in 2bdrm/2bth apartment. Pool, 
Parking, Kitchen privileges. Near Transporla- 
tk>n. Students Wekx>me. Available-'B/l . Before 
8pm: 310-826-1970. 

BRENTWOOD. Private bedroom, R/S, car- 
pets, patk}, A/C, large ctosets, laundry, park- 
ing, $635. 310-395-REh4T. www.westskJeren- 
tals.oom 

LOOKING FOR ROOMMATE for a 
2bdnn/2.5bth townhouse in /^leta 213-422- 
1199. 

PALMS. Private bdrm/bth in nice, quiet, clean 
apartnient. $550/month. Private parking nego- 
tiable. Daniel 310-558-1297. 

SANTA MONICA. 2BDRM/1BA. apartment. 
Washer/dryer in building, street paridng. Fe- 
male only, grad student/professional pre- 
ferred. $680/nrK)-*-utilities and deposit. Avail- 
able 8/15. 310-451-0454. 

SANTA MONICA. Private bedroom, private 
bath. R/S, carpets, D/W. W/D, paricing, flex 
lease, $440. 310-395-REr^. www westskJer- 
entals.com 

SANTA MONICA. Private bedroom, r/s, car- 
pets, patio. D/W. fireplace, large closets, laun- 
dry , partying, $600. 310-395-7368. www.west- 
sklerentals.com 

SANTA MONICA. Private bedroom, R/S. car- 
pets, D/W, large ck>sets, laundry, garage, utili- 
ties included. $500. 310-395-RENT 
www. westsklerentals . com 



9500 

Roommates-Privato Room 



SANTA MONICA. Private room In specious 
4txjrm oordo. Bedroom w/sikling-glass-door 
to large patk). W/D. Pool table. 12 bk>cks from 
beach. Great neightmrhood. Pets maytw. 
$800/nrKXith-f utilities. Availat>le now. 310-396- 
4348. 

WESTWOOD. Private bedroom, pet OK. R/S, 
carpets, D/W, fireplace, W/D, yard, parking, 
$550. 310-395-RENT. www.westskJeren- 
tals.com 

WESTWOOD® Manning/Santa Monk:a Blvd. 
Large 2/2 apt. Room available-bright&large 
w/private bath, 2 ctosets-t-built-in cabinet. 
Gated-pari(ing $850negotiable. Available 8/1. 
tak>n8on13®aol.con 213 683-6808. 



9600 

Roommates-Shared Room 



GAYLEY NEXT TO UCLA large room to share 
in 2t>drm/2t)th. private condo. Non-smokir>g fe- 
rruUe only. Fully-fumished, bakx}ny, garage. 
$500/fTX)nth. 310-208-7748. 

NONSMOKING FEMALE ROOMMATE want- 
ed for 2bdrm/2bth. Indudes pariung, walking 
distance to UCLA. $575/month. 310-209- 
5622. 



9700 

Sublets 



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9700 

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$325/MONTH. WESTWOOD. AvaHabie July- 
August. Share spadous ibdnrVlbth. kitchen, 
livir)g room w/anotf>er student. 10-15mir« waMc 
to UCLA. 408-391-9361. thinhto@uda.edu. 

$975/month. West LA. 2bdmi/1blh. Duplex. 
Short-term lease, bright, hardvwxxj fkx)rs, dri- 
veway pariung, 2585 Sepulveda, 949-581- 
8660. 

LARGE ROOM AVAILABLE IN LOCAL 
CLASSIC(TREEHOUSE). Suitable for 
One/Two people. One of Closest resi- 
dences to UCLA. Make me an offer. $900 
obo. 310-739-2982. 

ONE BEDROOM/BATH in Beverty HHIs. For 
August. $650/month. NO deposit 310-717- 
5189. 



SUMMER SUBLET. Clean/Tumished West- 
wood 2bdrm/1bth. July 11 -Aug 20. $550/room. 
Ctose to UCLA/South of Wilshire/2min bus to 
campus. Need 2 CLEAN/RESPONSIBLE peo- 
ple. 310-474-5690. 

TREEHOUSE! Excellent locatwn, Imin from 
campus. Guaranteed par1dr>g, increditJie view, 
unh^ue architecture. 1 or 2 people, month-to- 
month. $800obo. 714-318-8484. 

WEST LA. Share 2bdrm/2bth apt. Avail- 
able mid-July through mid-Sept. Female, 
non-smoker. $600/month. 310-795-3341. 

WESTWOOD. Near Midvale/Levering. 
2bdnn/2bth. BakXMiy, partiaily-fumished, W/D 
downstairs, 2 pariung spaces, newly remo- 
deled. Gym, study kHjnge, internet access. 
$2200. Available August 5th. 310-822-9384. 



-f- ■ r JK^^ppsjpjf I- 



14 



THt WIY BRUIN • MONDAY, JULY 15, 2002 



SPORTS 



ISPERAW I Former Bruin recommended to UCI by Scates 



from page B 

Sp*'raw lettered for the Bruins as 
a middle blocker from 1992-96, win- 
ning two national championships 
and finally becoming a starter as a 
fifth-year senior. He then served as 



a volunteer assistant coach before 
becoming a full-time assistant for 
the past four years under legendary 
head coach AJ Scates. 

"It's a good hire by UC Irvine," 
Scates said. "He's a good teacher." 

Scates, who believed his assis- 



tant was better than many current 
Division 1 head coaches, always 
supported Speraw's dream of 
becoming a head coach. He recom- 
mended Speraw to UCI when the 
Anteater head coach position 
became vacant, even though it 



1 



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I Techniques for creating powerful 

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July i6, i8, 197:00 pm 

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meant losing a top assistant to a 
team he would face twice a year. 

Speraw is thankful for Scates' 
help and knows he has a ways to go 
before he can even come close to 
matching his mentor's success. 

"I'm used to winning a champi- 
onship every year at UCLA," he 
said. "It's going to take some time at 
UCI." 

Speraw will replace Charlie 
Brande, who left the position dur- 
ing the off-season to concentrate 
on coaching the UCI women's team. 
Brande was an assistant coach for 
the UCLA women's team in 1982. 

Mike Sealy, a three-time All- 
American setter from 1990-93 and a 
volunteer assistant in 2001 for the 
Bruins, will be the top candidate to 
replace Speraw, according to 
Scates. 




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V 



< 






J 



SAYNOj Smith says teams 
practice, defense stressed 



from page "B 

Washington State's Marcus Moore 
among the notables. 

Loyola Marymount and 
Pepp>erdine both have entire squads 
made up of mostly incoming fresh- 
men who 

were permitr 

ted by the 
NCAA to play 
on the same 
squad. 
Pepperdine 
hejid coach 
Paul 
Westphal was 
in attendance 
July 13. 

-Westphal 
and other coaches came this week- 
end during the official visitation 
period," Smith said. "They get two 
weeks out of the summer to come 
and see their players." 

The Say No Classic began as the 
Olympic Development League. 
When professionals crashed the 
Olympic party, the league changed 



"We have a peaceful opera- 
tion and talk to our players 
about the dos and don'ts of 
drugs." 

Michael Wdr 
Director of Communications 



its name but not its focus. 

"Most of the top teams practice, 
and coaches give simple offenses," 
Smith said. "We stress defense. 
Sometimes we don't get defense, 
but we stress it 

"We have a peaceful operation 
and talk to our 
players about the 
dos and don'ts of 
drugs." 

Michael Wolf, 
director of com- 
munications and 
Fey's coach for 
the summer, invi^ 
ed Briiin fans to 
come see new 
faces Fey, Bums 
and Hollins. 
"Evan Bums is as complete a 
high school player you can find at 6- 
foot-8, and they're all really 
unselfish players that wiD work 
very well with an experienced 
team," Wolf said 

Admission to the Say No Classic 
is free. Teams play two times per 
weekend, Friday throu^ Sunday. 



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] SPORTS 



MONDAY. JULY 15, 2002 - THE DAILY BRUIN 



15 



BRIEFS 



Two-game penalty 
relief to Walcott 

UCLA sophomore point guard 
Ryan Walcott will be sitting out the 
first two regular-season games of the 
2002-03 season. i 

Somehow he managed to put a 
positive spin on it. 

Tm happy I got the year back," 
Walcott said from his home in 
Arizona. "That's what counts." 

Walcott decided to redshirt his 
freshman season after he had already 
played nine minutes during an exhibi- 
tion giune Nov. 1, 2001. 

His petition to redshirt was 
approved the next month by the 
NCAA, with the caveat that he would 
have to miss two regular season 
games in the futxire. Walcott waited 
to serve the suspension until now 
because of a pending proposal to 
change the NCAA rules concemmg 
redshirt violations 

The legislation wasn't resolved 
until April 2002, and the approved 
rules change did not affect the sus- 
pension Walcoa would have to serve. 
I Walcott will play in the exhibition 
' seaaon, but chose to "get the suspen- 
sion over with" by serving it at the 
beginning of this season. He will miss 
games against San Diego University 
on Nov. 26 and perennial NCAA pow- 
erhouse Duke on Nov. 30. 

"It's very tough," Walcott said 
about missing the Duke game, "but 
m be there rooting for the team." 

Nilsson breaks school 

record in 1500-meter 

run 



Running in the opjmsite comer of 
the countiy. at Uny Bowdoin College 
jin Brunswick, Me , Lena Nilsson 
found her way atop the UCLA record 
books. 

The junior ran the 1500-meter in a 
school-record 4.09.89 seconds at the 
New Balance Maine Distance 
Festival. 

Nilsson 's victory against a field of 
professional runners at the open 
meet in Maine qualified her for the 
European Championships in Munich, 
Aug. 6-11. 

"I wasn't expecting anything 
because I've been injured constantly 
for four, five years," Nilsson said 
about her success this off-season. 

Although Nilsson was one of the 
finest collegiate runners in 2002, win- 
ning the 1500 at the NCAA finals in 
May and chosen as Pac-10 women's 
track and field athlete of the year, the 
European Championships are the 
most significant event in her career. 

"The European Championships 
can be harder than the big 
(American) meets just because track 
is so big in Europe. All the great run- 
ners are from there," she said. 

"I'm a little nervous but at the same 
time, I don't have anything to lose." 

The previous school record of 
4:10.3 was set by Fraiicie Larrieu 
(Smith) in 1974. 

In other track and field news, 
Monique Henderson (400-meter), 
Briona Reynolds (shot put), and 
Jeremy Silverman (shot put) will be 
in Kingston, Jamaica this week to 
compete at the 2002 World Junior 
Track and Field Championships. The 
meet features the top 14- to 19-year- 
old athletes in the world. 



Michael Fey offers mobility at center position 



Compiled by J.P Hoorristra, 
Bruin Senior Staff 



Daily 



I 

ByJefTAgase 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
jagase@media.ucla.edu 

Glance quickly as UCLA fresh- 
man Michael Fey runs the floor 
for Hank's Big Time at the Nike 
Say No Classic, and you can't help 
but see a passing resemblance to 
former Bruin Dan Gadzuric. 

Don't expect too many rim- 
bending dunks or air-balled free 
throws from Fey, though. The 
resemblance is stricUy superficial. 

"He's not the same kind of 
power player as Dan," said Fey's 
summer coach Michael Wolf. 
"He's a very skilled player for a kid 
his size. You can tell he's been 
playing basketball for a lot 
longer." 

During his team's July 13 victo- 
ry over Hoopmasters, the 6-foot- 
11 Fey finished with a smooth 
baby hook, came out to challenge 
a shooting guard on the perimeter, 
and drained a 19-foot jump shot - 
things UCLA fans haven't been 
accustomed to seeing from the 
center position. 



"I've always worked on my 
jump shot," Fey said after the 
game. "I want to have at least a 15- 
foot jumper so I'm not just playing 
with my back to the basket all the 
time." 

Fey, who plarmed on joining the 
Bruins last fall but failed to 
achieve a qualifying test score, 
took a year off of organized bas- 
ketball while attending junior col- 
lege in his home state of 
Washington. The layoff showed a 
bit, as he labored near the end of 
the game. 

"I need to get in a little better 
sh2q)e," Fey said. "I'm used to 
pickup games and felt a little 
winded out there. I just need to be 
lifting and playing as many games 
as I can." 

Fey is listed in the Say No 
Classic program at 240 pounds - 
the same as Gadzuric in the UCLA 
media guide. The figure might be 
generous, as Fey's frame appears 
a notch smaller than the imposing 
Gadzuric. 

What Fey doesn't yet have in 
build, he compensates for in 



mobility and smoothness of move- 
ment. When an opposing power 
forward surged to the basket from 
outside the three-point arc, Fey 
stayed with him down inside and 
closed off the lane. Later, he 
caught a guard napping on the 
outside to steal the ball and gener- 
ate a fast-break basket. 

"He's not a back to the basket 
kind of player right now," Wolf 
said. "He passes well and is a nice 
finisher. He's a lot like (former 
Stanford center) Curtis 
Borchardt." 

Fey seems the natural choice to 
start down low for a team other- 
wise lacking a true center. He 
would then free up junior TJ. 
Cummings to play a more natural 
power forward position and allow 
for UCLA's bevy of long sopho- 
mores to create matchup prob- 
lems for the opposition at small 
forward. 

Fey isn't worrying about logis- 
tics. He's just glad to have seen the 
standardized test cloud drift away 
firom over his head 

"I was more relieved than 



MICHAEL FEY PROFILE 



/ 



Haight-e-n 

Wel^: 240 

Position: Center 

Hometown: CMympia. WA (Capftal HS) 

Prep M^ights: Averaged 20.0 poims, 
10.0 rebounds, 1.5 blocked shots, and ' 
shot 56.0 percent from the f»^ ... a 
Top 50 national high school prospect 
. . . was a frst-team AH-^te setec- 
tJon In Washington . . . played m the 
Washington 4A All-^ar contest at the / 
Sun Dome in Yakinva, WA. 

Source: L'CLA Spots Info, Sqr No Clmic 
.Media Gakk 

happy," he said "I was so close, 
wondering if I could ever get over 
the hump. Then I came to the 
Kansas game two days after pass- 
ing my test and people I don't even 
know were coming up and cort- 
gratulating me. 

"It made me feel good and 
makes me want to play hard for 
them." 

This is the first in a three-part 
series profiling three UCLA basket- 
ball recruits at the Say No Classic. 



1 . _^-^ 

QUINONEZ I Overtime sessions give teams chance to win 



from page V 

bizarre could only happen in MLB. 

2) Men's Soccer - Nov 11, 2001. UCLA 3, 
Washington 2 (OT). 

UCLA needed a win in the last game of the 
season to secure a playoff berth. The Bruins 
were losing 2-1 for almost all of the second 
half. In the 88th minute, Matt Taylor scored to 
force overtime. A few minutes later, Tony 
Lawson scored the winning goal. 

How heartbroken would the Bruins have 
been if the NCAA used the same rule as the 



Worid Cup? In the first round of the World 
Ci^), ties are given after 90 minutes of play 
and no overtimes are allowed. 

3) Women's Water Polo - Feb. 24, 2002. 
Stanford 6, UCLA 6 (2 OT) 

This game could teach a lesson to Bud 
Selig. This wasn't a playoff game, or a very 
meaningful Pac-10 game. This was just a tour- 
nament at the beginning of the season, and 
the teams could have very easily stopped 
playing and called it a tie. 

Just like the MLB All-Star Game was sup- 
posed to feature the two best possible teams, 



the Bruins and the Cardinal were the best 
two teams in the country back then and were 
at the end of the season when they faced 
each other in the national title game. 

During the game, UCLA and Stanford alter- 
nated goals, and were tied 4-4 at the end of 
regulation. Both teams scored once in the 
first overtime, and went to sudden death 
overtime, where Brenda Villa scored, giving 
the match to Stanford. 

At any game featuring the best two teams 

QUIRONEZ I Page 13 



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MORE BRUIN SPORTS NEWS ONLINE 



• Kirk Kilgour, Bruin volleyball great, dies at 54 

• ESPY award recap: Nuveman loses to Bird 

• UCLA football recruits dominate prep all-star games 



Page 16 




McwDAY, JriA 15,2002 



www.dailybrtiin.ucla.edu 



Speraw leaves 
UCLA for head 
coach position 
^ at UC Irvine 

FORMER BRUIN 

VOLLEYBALL PLAYER, 

ASSISTANT COACH 

REACHES GOAL 

By Diamond Leung 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
dleung(g)media. ucla.edu 

For the last decade, John 
Speraw has been a part of UCLA 
men's volleyball as a player and an 
assistant coach. So even after he 
accomplished his goal of becoming 
a head coach, as he was named the 
top man at UC Irvine on Tuesday, 
forgive him for not being quite 
ready to leave. 

"It's going to be a sad day when I 
clean out my ofRce," Speraw said. 
"It's a q)ecial opportunity, but my 
time at UCLA has been incredible, 
it's bittersweet" 

SPERAW I Page 14 



Skateboarding policy contradictory 



By Bruce Iran 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 
btran@media.ucla.edu 

Some consider it to be a conve- 
nience, while others call it a nuisance. 
But both sides agree that it's a contra- 
diction in l^CLA pobcy: 

While skateboards have been 
deemed illegal on campus, you can buy 
one at the Copeland Sporting Goods 
store in Ackerman l^nicn. 

"It's ridiculous," said Dan Fulford, a 
psychology student who has been 
skateboarding for 16 years. They'll 
give you a ticket for standing on the 
skateboard you just bought a few min- 
utes ago at Copeland. It's such a big 
contradiction." 

Skateboarders are calling for l^CLA 
to follow Copeland Store sales poUcy 
by allowing skateboarders to skate 
legally on some areas of campus. 
Other students want UCLA to elimi- 
nate the contradiction by banning the 
sale of skateboards at Copeland. 

Copeland has responded by posting 
a sign that acknowledges it is illegal to 
skateboard on campus, requesting 
buyers to "please respect campus poli- 
cies." 

Copeland Store Director Greg Byrne 
declined to conunent on the issue. 

Director of UCLA Store Keith 
Shane, on the other hand, doesn't 
believe an issue even exists. 



"I haven't heard anything from the 
UCLA administration or UCPD, so it 
hasn't been a problem," Shane said. 
•"Until we do hear something or have a 
problem, our hands are tied." 

Part of the reason is because 
Copeland is lease-operated, and is the 
first store of its kind to work in 
Ackerman Union. As a result, 
Copeland handles its Own merchandis- 
ing and UCLA Store is reluctant to 
become too involved with what 
Copeland sells. 

Nevertheless, it doesn't help stu- 
dents like fourth-year history student 
Sam Woon, who was given a ticket for 
skateboarding on campus with his 
newly bought skateboard from 
Copeland. j 

"It sucks because I had just paid 
fifty bucks at Copeland and the police 
confiscated it," Woon said. "I didn't 
know about it being illegal to board 
here, and I didn't see the sign inside 
Copeland either. Why in the world 
would UCLA sell something that is ille- 
gal to use?" 

The skateboarders want UCLA to 
meet them halfway. Under current 
UCLA pohcy, it's difficult to find any 
place on campus that is legal to skate- 
board. 

"I don't see why it's illegal to bike 
and rollerblade on campus, but they 
have bike racks and rollerblading 
classes at the Wooden Center," said 



third-year undeclared student Nathan 
Waxer. 

"IICLA is willing to accommodate 
them, but not the skateboarders. It 
seems to me that UCLA is doing nega- 
tive profiling against skateboarders." 

At the other end of the spectrum, 
some students believe skateboarders 
should be taken off the sales rack at 
Copeland. 

"It's a danger to us as students to 
have skateboarders just going as they 
please on campus," incoming firesh- 
man Martha Hodges said. "What kind 
of message does it send for the UCLA 
Store to sell skateboards? The respon- 
sibility is on Copeland and UCLA to 
correct this hypocrisy." 
» At this point however, it doesn't 
seem like Copeland or UCLA will 
change its policy. 

"It was an issue addressed when 
Copeland first came on campus," 
Shane said. "The sign explains every- 
thing. At that time, it was determined it 
was okay to allow Copeland to sell 
skateboards." 

For Fulford, the sign is of little com- 
fort. 

"It's great that Copeland sells skate- 
boards, but UCLA is the one who is 
putting the contradiction out there," 
Fulford said. "But no matter what, peo- 
ple are just going to skateboard when- 
ever they want and wherever they 
want" 




ANGIE LEVINE/Dail, .,,. . Staff 

Luciano Rodriguez, a skateboarding student from Don Bosco Tech. 





] 




Boys of 
Summer 



PLAYERS DISPLAY SKILLS, GAIN EXPERIENCE IN SUMMER PRO LEAGUE 



EDWARD 
LIN/Daily 
BRtiN Senior 
Staff 

Former Bruin Billy 
Knight (1997-2001) 
scored 29 points on 
July 13 to lead JBDL 

of the Summer Pro 

League over The 

Beat. 



By Mayar Zokaei 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
mzokaeJ@media.ucla.edu 

The Dada Summer Pro 
League is a virtual rite of sum- 
mer for many NBA basketball 
players, an opportunity to hone 
their sldlls and refine their game 
for the upcoming season. 

It's also a chance at stardom 
for many who can only dream of 
being affiliated with the NBA It 
is a forum where tliey can com- 
pete against NBA-caliber play- 
ers and shov/ scouts, coaches 
and general managers Lil Bow 
Wow isn't the only player trying 



to be "like Mike" this summer. 

While former UCLA stars 
Earl Watson and Jelani McCoy 
fit the mold of the former 
description, ex-Bruins Billy 
Knight and Toby Bailey are bet- 
ter suited for the latter. 

In all, the rosters of the 
24 teams in the SPL are 
proliferated with for- 
mer Bruins, including 
Darrick Martin and 
TVacy Murray of the 
Young Guns and Ike 
Nwankwo of the 
Houston Rockets. 
But just being on a ros- 
ter for an NBA team doesn't 
necessarily constitute a spot in 
the NBA or any basketball team. 
"We like that we give players 
a chance to play against a high 
level of competition and some- 
times play guys who have 
played in the (NBA)," SPL scout 
and advisor Jerry Clark said. 
"We also hope that some of 
these players realize this is 
something limited, that maybe 
they should consider going out 
into the real worid and getting a 
job." 

Los Angeles Lakers rookie 
Kareem Rush's sentiments 



about being in the SPL sound 
more like those of a player on 
the other, less greener side of 
the grass. 

"I'm just happy to be playing 
for Los Angeles and being here 
in the SPL," Rush said. "I'd 
rather be here than anywhere 
else, even if I was the first play- 
er to go in the draft." 

While Rush's gratitude may 
be attributed more to the fact 
that he's playing for the three- 
time defending NBA champions 
than anything else, playing in 
the SPL has given his coaches a 
chance to see his rapid improve- 
ment. After scoring nine points 
in his SPL debut, Rush has 
churned out back-to-back 20- 
plus point games but sat out the 
last game. 

"Originally, I wanted to go to 
UCLA," Rush said. "But now, I'm 
here in L.A and 
playing and 
scoring for 
the Lakers. 
It's funny 
how things 
turned out." 

Current 
Laker Mark 



Madsen joins Rush and McCoy 
as the only bona fide Lakers on 
the team's SPL squad. Madsen, a 
crowd favorite, has grasped the 
opportunity to play in the SPL to 
prove his talent to critics and 
coaches and to e3q)ress his mal- 
content with some of the Lakers 
practice regimens. 

"Tell your dad to take it easy 
on us a Uttle, man," Madsen said 
to the son of Lakers SPL head 
coach Kurt Rambis after LA.'s 
91-83 victoiy over the Rockets. 
"Come on man, just tell him less 
running." 

Though many of these play- 
ers are. going in different direc- 
tions, they all share one thing: 
the penchant for basketball that 
has driven them to this point 
and beyond. 

SPL President John Younesi 
agrees. 

"For two weeks, these guys 
are all doing something they 
love," he said. "That in itself 

makes it something special 

for all the fans and families 

to come out and see what 
we're about" 

The SPL runs through 
Sunday. 



BRUIN FRESHMEN BURNS, 
FEY HOLLINS SHOWCASE 
AT NIKE SAY NO CLASSIC 

I I 

ByJeffA^ase 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
jagase@media.ucla.edu 

Some of the biggest names in UCLA bas- 
ketball are spending theu* summer in a tiny 
gym 15 minutes firom campus. 

The Nike Say No Classic at the intimate 
gym of West Los 





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CONNECTION: Ray Young. 
0|MiTho(npeon. Cedric Bozamao, 
14. Cumirlngs. Ancre Pattsnon. 
Fey, E¥B« Bums and Rysn 
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is August 3. 
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Angeles College features eight Bruins, includ- 
ing incoming fi^eshmen Evan Bums, Michael 
Fey and Ryan Hollins. Entering its 26th year, 
the summer league boasts players fi-om 
Hawaii to Yale and is an ideal showcase for 
UCLA fans starved for basketball, who will 
be pleased to hear that both the incoming 
fi^shmen and returning players are being 
lauded by the league's staff and fans. 

Games are played by NBA rules and con- 
sist of four ei^t-minute quarters. The preva- 
lence of man-to-man defense insures a ftiri- 
ous, raw and entertaming game, says Say No 
Classic President and League Conmussioner 
Rod Smith. 

"Because we play the games by NBA 

rules, they are very similar to the new 

movement in the NBA itself, where 

WHEFE: The^fr»% there's a very active and hvely 

LoMBaMh State OMik S^me," Smith said. 

"Obviously, the key part of 

the league is the UCLAs, the 

l^SCs and the Division I 



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schools. But you also have 
other kids playing to 
show tliat they can play 
at a UCLA or use: leveL" 
While some players 
use the league to stay 
fi'esh and competitive. 
Fey is reinforcing the 
basics. He took a year off 
firom organized basket- 
bail LO focus on academics 
at a junior college in 
Washington. 
"I haven't played in real 
games with referees in a wliile, 
so Fm still adjusting to the fouls 
^ and everything," Fey said. "It's 
good to just get used to playing - 
moving off of screens, setting screens - 






no/day j^ 
tf3A W 



the basics of 
game." I 

NCAA nies dic- 
tate a maximum 
of two current 
players per 
school can play 
on the same 
team, and 
coaches cannot 
be affihated with 
the players' college 
teams. The regula- 
tions guarantee at 
least some degree 
of parity as talent 
is dispersed 

throughout the 
league's 20 

teams. 

"About 90 per- 
cent are four or six- 
point games," Sniitli said. 

The basketball is entertaining and much 
of it takes place above the rim. Ttam names 
are as inventive as moves fi-equently fiashed 
by the league's more dazzling players. 

Redslurt senior Ray Young will be back in 
the fall at UCLA and plays for TVaimia, while 
sophomores Dyon Thompson and Cedric 
Bozeman are together on Hank's Califonua 
Select, a team named for league supporter 
Hank Salvatori. 

Hollins plays for Hanks' Lil' Hoopers. Fey 
plays on Hank's Big Time, junior T.J. 
Cununings tar West C'oast and sophomore 
Andre Patterson and Burns play for Uie Say 
No team. 

Every Pac-lO team but Stanford is repre- 
sented, with use's Craven twins and 



SAYNOI Page 14 



Gilbert 
Qujflonez 

Stat Geek 

equnonez@mB(lairtaaJu 



liAiLY Bruin File 
Photo 

Cedric Bozeman 

(above) and UCLA 

teammate D[jon 

Thompson are 

competing together 

on Hank's California 

Select of the NBA 

Summer Pro League. 



AU-Star game, 

other sports 

have no place 

for ties 

There are no ties in baseball! On 
July 9, the M^or League 
Baseball All-Star game was 
played. For the first ten and a half 
innings, the game was one of the 
best All-Star games I had ever seen. 
There were great plays, more 
offense than usual, and it was a 
close, competitive game. 

After the top of the 1 1th inning, I 
was as excited as I could be. The 
game was tied 7-7 and for once, an 
All-Star game was living up to the 
hype. Then, a tragedy occurred. 
Commissioner Bud Selig started 
discussing something with All-Star 
managers Bob Brenly and Joe 
Torre. Brenly 
and Torre were 
complaining 
that they had 
run out of pitch- 
ers. Selig came 
up with a bril- 
liant idea. He 
broke all rules 
ever established 
by baseball and 
said if the 
National League 
didn't score in 
the bottom of 
the 11th inning, 
the game would 
be declared a 
tie. 

The crowd, along with the rest 
of the United States, started chanti- 
ng, "Let them play!" Trash was 
thrown at Selig. 

Benito Santiago came up to bat 
with a ruimer on second, two outs, 
and a chance to win the game. He 
promptly struck out, and the play- 
ers quickly vacated the field. 
Neither team congratulated them- 
selves on a great game. No MVP 
award was given. 

One of the reasons that the MLB 
All-Star game was supposed to be 
special was because it was compet- 
itive and played like a real game. 
No real game during the regular 
season would ever end in a tie- 
Why should the All-Star game? 

Actually, why should any game 
in any sport end in a tie? 

Here are four classic examples 
of overtime games involving UCLA 
teams where ties would not have 
been acceptable. All of these are 
fi'om the 2001-2002 school year. 

1) Men's Basketball - March 17, 
2002. UCLA 105, Cincinnati 101 (2 
OT) 

This was a traditional March 
Madness upset game, with the 
Bruins staying close the whole 
game and coming back at the end. 
Both teams had the lead, lost it, 
had it and lost it again at the end of 
regulation and during the over- 
times. 

Imagine if Selig were to come 
onto the court after the first over- 
time and proclaim: "In the interest 
of not ii\juring the players and 
allowmg more time for them to 
study, Steve Lavin, Bob Huggins 
and I have agreed to call this game 
a tie." 

Of course, something that 

QUlNONEZ I Page 15 



I 



f 



I 



=^: ■■^^'i^^'m m^^'mi'Sf^^^^ i' ^^ ' ^^ - '^' '-'■-' 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES 

DAILY BRUIN 



the UCLA community since 1919 



Summer Weekly Edition Monday, July 22, 2002 



www.daifybniin.ucla.edu 



Regents vote to raise 
nonresident tuition 



By ChrfstJna Jenkins 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
cjenkins@media.ucla.edu 

SAN FRANCISCO — Burdening 
oirik]f-6tate students with part of 
the state budget shortfall, the 
University of California Board of 
Regents voted Thursday to 
increase nonresident tuition for the 
2002-2003 academic year. 

Tuition will increase by 10 per- 
cent in the fail for nonresident 
undergraduates, followed by an 
additional 6 percent increase in the 
spring. The total hike means a 
$1,305 increase from $10,704 this 
year to $12,009 next year. 

Nonresident graduate students 
will incur a one-time $428 increase 
in the fall. Tuition is currently 
$10,704 and will rise to $11,132. 

Approved by a 14-1 vote, the fee 
hike will give the UC $12 million to 
rescue outreach programs slated 
for cuts in Gov. Gray Davis' May 
budget revision. The programs are 
aimed at encouraging K-12 stu- 
dents to apply to the UC. A portion 
of the revenue will also fund 



employee health benefits. 

During the 2002-2003 fiscal yeai, 
the students who never benefited 
from outreach programs yfrm 
nonetheless be paying for them. 

The legislature strongly favored 
nonresident tuition increases," said 
UC Budget Vice President Lany 
Hershman. 

Several regents said they were 
reluctant to approve the hike since 
the decision might decrease the 
number of out-of-state applicants. 
Approximately 6 percent of all UC 
students are nonresidents. 

"We are very committed to diver- 
sity," said Regent Peter Preuss. If 
the decision means the UC will lose 
its outxtf-state students, he said, 
"We are losing a large part of wlu«t 
the university is supposed to be." 

However, one UCLA undergrad- 
uate frt)m Maryland said she 
wouldn't have cared about how 
high tuition was when she applied 
— she's just upset that it's going up 
again. 

"I would have applied to UCLA 

TUmON I Page 7 



NONRESIDENT TUITION HIKES 



Tuition for out-of-state students in the UC made 
an undexpected steep climb at the July regents' 
meeting, with undergraduate nonresidents 
taking a substantial hit. 





D LIN/ Daily Bk. 



■• r. ■< 1 1 -n ^^ I A r r 



eoopl J I I I I I— L 



SOUKL UCOMoiortiMl 

Chris Montalvo/Daily Briin SeniIor Staff 



On July 18. students protest the resignation of Pauline Agbayani-Siewert, the only tenured Pilipino professor at UCLA. 

Students protest loss of professor 

INSTRUCTOR LEAVES 

FOR GAL STATE L.A. 

AFER UCLA FAILS 

TO RETAIN HER 



commission 



j Qy Andrew Edwards 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 

aedwards@media.ucla.edu 

SAN FRANCISCO — Last week 
the University of California Board of 
Regents voiced its concern that leg- 
Mative plans to overhaul public edu- 
cation could reduce the university's 
uatamomf frem ttm stato. 

Tlu- ifgfiits discussed proposals 
to merge administration of grades K- 
I_ aivd Uigiit I «.Hlvuation \mder one 
body and to eliminate the weighting 
of Advanced Placement and honors 
courses for admissions purposes. 

Under the original 1960 Master 
Plan for Higher Education, commu- 



nity colleges provide continuing 
education for all Califomians, the 
CSU focuses primarily on four-year 
degrees and the UC is the state's pri- 
mary research institution. 

Currently, higher education in 
California is under the jurisdiction 
of the California Postsecondary 
Education Conunission. The new 
plan wmM r&fi^moB CPBC with the 

California Eduialioii ( 'oininission. 

which would oversee K-16 education 
in the state. 

The new draft was written by the 
Joint Legislative Committee to 
develop a master plan for education. 

Some regents felt the UC would 
lose autonomy under reorganization. 



"My concern is that this is such a 
monumental task ... we will have 
less focus on our primary mission," 
said Regent John Davies. 

"We have to be careful how much 
resources we devote to problems 
other than our own," he added. 

UC President Richard Atkinson 
sent a letter to Sen. Dede Alpert, D- 
San Diego, chair of the Joint 

( omrnittoo, outlining* the university's 

positions on the May draft. 

The UC acknowledges that CPEC 
could be improved, but maintains 
UC interests may not receive enough 
attention in the new CEC, as K-12 

PUUI I Page 7 



By Kelly Raybum and Amanda 
Schapel 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
krayburn@media.ucla.edu 
aschapel(i)media. ucla.edu 

A group of about 100 students 
last week protested loudly, 
before snaking dead-silently 
through the Public Policy 
Building to help move UCLA's 
only tenured Pilipino professor 
out from her fifth-floor office. 

Pauline Agbayani-Siewert was 
a popular professor at UCLA who 
wa-s tenured in .Tanuary of 2001 
and is now leaving for Caiifoniia 
State University, Los Angeles, 
after UCLA failed to retain her. 
She was dedicated to her stu- 
dents, the Pilipino community 
and her research, supporters 
said. For them, the administra- 




ED US/ Daily Britn Seniok STAfr 

Fourth-year psychobiology student 
Cynthia Antonio speaks to crowd. 

tion's apparent lack of enthusi- 
asm in attempting to retain her 
just doesn't make sense. 

"A great injustice has been 
done here at UCLA," said fifth- 



year doctoral student Annalisa 
Enrile, as the rally began. 

Enrile said she had the oppor- 
tunity to study at many presti- 
gious universities in pursuit of 
her doctorate, including the 
University of Chicago, but selec^ 
ed UCLA because she would 
have the chance to work with 
Agbayani-Siewert 

Agbayani-Siewert received a 
formal offer from CSULA's 
School of Social Work in June 
and was asked to reply with an 
answer soon thereafter, accord- 
ing to a "timeline of events" 
passed out at the rally. She then 
went through the normal reten- 
tion procedure with the UCLA 
administration, letting them 
know she had another offer. 

Though the administration will 
not discuss the specifics of their 
offer, in the end Agbayani- 
Siewert liked what she saw from 
CSULA better. And apparently, 
she is not the first to feel that 
way. In the last few years UCLA's 
School of Public Policy and 
Social Research has lost two 

TENURE I Page 8 



Visions J°^ Future 

UCLA RESEARCHERS DEVELOP CHIP TO REPLACE RETINAS, FORM IMAGES FOR BLIND 



By Edward Ctiiao 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
echiao@media.ucla.edu 

tJCLA researchers have helped to develop a 
"vision chip" which can help some blind 
patients see again. 

The development is good news for one in 
four Americans over the age of 64, who suffer 
firom a now curable form of blindness accord- 
ing to the Macular Degeneration Research 
Foundation. 

In humans, normal vL»on starts when an 
image passes through the eyeball and into the 
retina at the back of the eye. The retina con- 
tains photoreceptors which break down the 
image and creates the corre^K)nding neural 

HOW REnNAL PROSTHESIS WORKS 

To help the bind regain viskw. UCIA researchers in association with Second Sight have devetoped a "visjon chip. 
The chip contains artifWal photoreceptors that can generate electrical stimulus on ine retina of the eye. The 
theory Is that the blind woukJ see images as lights on a square matrix. 



stimulus, or signals, to the brain. 

In many blind patients, the retina degener- 
ates and the photoreceptors no longer func- 
tion, leading to blindness. 

The vision chip works by replacing the func- 
tion of the eye's retina, acting like a photorecep- 
tor which processes images and sends the cor- 
rect signals to the brain to form an image. 

"In some people, the nerves still work, but the 
retina is dead," said professor Warren 
Grundfest, chair of the biomedical engineering 
department at UCLA. "With this technology, 
electrodes are implanted in the back of the 
(patient's) eye, which is controlled by a very 
complex system" 

The system was developed firom research led 
by Second Sight, a 4-year old company in 



Valencia, Calif. 

It consists of a tiny video camera mounted 
onto a pair of glasses to capture images. These 
images are then iHocessed by a tiny computer to 
prepare the visual information for the prosthet- 

' EYE I Page 7 



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edutatlon and advocacy for the blind. 






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JOOO B.C.Ei - The Hammurablan Code sets the cost of 
'^e surgeiies at 10 shekels and the punishment for 
botched op^i^tfons as the loss of the surgeon's hands. 

400 - A spefcfal hospice Is established specifically for 
tha care of the sightless at Caesarea in Cappadocia. 

■fifiO • Hundfeds of prisoners are blinded by their cap-, 
tors as a pnessure tor nwisom. In sympathji; King Louis 
iX of Francd sets up an Institute fbr the care of the 
biindlnPari^. 

t798.- Wtentin Hanv writes "An Essay on the Education 
of the BBnd.^ in whJch he presents the Idea of emboss- 
ing letters t^ improve the education of the blind. 

1819 - Hen* Johann Wllhelm Klein founds an Institute for 
the band where dogs are trained as guides, though hia 
Idea does not Invnedlately catch oa 

1829 - Louis Braille revises the raised dot system of M. 
Charles Barbler to create a more efficient tactile i^dr 
tng and writljig method for the blind. 

19t1-l9l8 - L^rge numbers of German soldiers are 
bunded In the first Wbrtd War. As a result, more atten- 
tion Is given to training dogs for the blind. 

1929 - Morris Frank founds The Seeing Eye to breed 
and train dogs as guides for the bRnd. 

1929 ■ Helen Keller begins woric as spokesperson and 
ambassadof^ for the American Foundation for the 
Blind. 

1975 - The IntematJonal Agpncy for the Prevention of 
Blindness, an independent, nongovernment organiza 
tfon, (8 fouwjed with the goal of preventing and curing 
blindness woridwide. 

1978 - The wtrid Health Organization programme for 
the Prevention of the BHnd is created to develop sci- 
ence-based «rategjes to fight the major causes of 
avnfdflMe hif^xiness. 

s m Fourulmlon for Ow Blind, WorW Uteilh 

diwiinaiQii, T|« New York Institute for Special BdiKsulon, 

Aasortallon for fiiilffe n.)«s 




ED LIN/Daily Briin Senior Staff 

Some Westwood i-esidents are upset about grafTiti. trash not being picked up and 
couches, like the one above, littering the streets. 

Residents, students raise 
concerns about Westwood 



By Brian Sullivan 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
bsullivan@media.ucla.edu 

Westwood residents feeling UCLA 
students show disrespect for their 
community have formed a committee 
to improve living conditions in the 
North Village. 

The three-year-old North Village 
Improvement Committee held its first 
pubUc meeting on the evening of July 
17 at the LTniversity Catholic Center 
on Gayley Avenue. 

Many of those attending were 
apartment owners residing in 
Westwood who have growing con- 
cerns over student drunJcenness, van- 
dalism, noise coming from parties 
and, of course, Midnight Yell. 

"My mother wakes up and thinks 
someone is dying or on fire," said 
Larry Condre, a Westwood resident 
commenting on Midnight Yell. 

Other concerns included a lack of 



parking, couches left on sidewalks, 
overflowing trash bins, broken beer 
bottles in the street and graffiti. 

"It's basically about one thing," 
said Shelley Taylor, founder of the 
NVIC, -QuaUtyoflife." 

The meeting's purpose was to 
Organize local residents in an effort 
to clean up Westwood and voice frus- 
trations concerning UCLA students 
sharing the community. 

Several residents complained 
about vandalism of property, such as 
damage to apartments, car break-ins 
and smashed windshields. Many 
attribute such vandalism to the flow 
of drunk students coming up from 
Westwood Village Thursday and 
Saturday nights. 

Some even suggested the universi- 
ty withhold diplomas from students 
who are repeatedly a public nui- 
sance. 

MEETING I Page 10 



Contact 



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310-825-2538 310-825-2096 310-825-2161 

a&a(9(nedn.uda.edu 8purt89media.ucia.edu ads®rnedia.ucla.edu 



tin Mbf In* 01*11 M 



Index 



Classified . 

Crossword . 

Sports 



.19 
23 
26 



Viewpoint ... 11 

A&E 16 

Movie Times . 18 



News Briefs ... 3 
Letters 11 



Special Coverage 



Mercedes-Benz Cup 
Inside 14-15 




a 



THE DAILY BRUIN ■ MONDAY. JULY 22. 2002 



SPORTS 



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By Gractela Sandoval 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
gsandoval@media.ucla.edu 

On July 19 Lafayette Blankenship 
thanked her teachers, mentors, fam- 
ily and friends for empowering her 
to accomplish her dreams and for 
being excellent role models. 

Blankenship. a senior at Jordan 
High School in South Gate, will be 
the first person in her family to grad- 
uate from high school and the first to 
00 to college. 

But she was not giving a gradua- 
tion speech. 

Blankenship completed the 
Summer Intensive Transfer 
ESxperiei»ce Math and Science pro- 
gram, a six-day intensive pregram at 
UCLA, which guides high school stu- 
dents interested in physical and bio- 
logical sciences on how to transfer 
to a University of California campus 
tkrough workshops, mentoring and 
rf aea rch projects. 

This summer over 200 high school 
and community college students 
from all over Southern California 
will partake in SITE, SITE Math and 
Science, and the Simuner Inunersion 
Program hosted by I'CIAs Center 
for Community College 

ftutnerships. 

; The purpose of the programs is 
to provide the students the c^portu- 
nlties and resources to ensure that 
they have access to a university like 
UCLA," said CCCP Director Alfr^ 
Herrera. 

Since 1999. the SITE program has 
encouraged over 1.000 high school 
and city college students to pursue 





BRIEFS 



-^ < Wrt-. 1 



Staff 



ED LIN/Daily B 

Lafayette Blankenship hugs Lester Baron, SITE Math and Science transffer pro- 
gram mentor, goodbye. "Helping people leaves a mark in my life." Baron said. 



higher education. 

"Only by being educated and get- 
tii\g into key positions can you make 
a change and can society have a dif- 
ferent view of 'under-represented 
people*," said Lestor Baron, a partic- 



^Moit in the first SITE program in 
1990, who this year was a SITE Math 
and Science mentor 

Lestor transferred to UCLA fixim 
West Los Angeles City College. Most 
of the mentors, like Baron, are trans- 



D LIN/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Director of the Center for Community 
College Partnerships Alfred Herrera 
tells students, "We need you to suc- 
ceed and believe in yourselves." 

fer UCLA students who want to give 
back to their communities. 

"It really put me on track. I knew 
what I wanted to do generally but 
SITE helped me see the route I had 
to take. It was really impacted, really 
intense, but it was good. It takes you 
step by step," Lestor said. 

Over the course of the programs, 
the students live with their mentors 
while researching universities and 
areas of study in which they are 
interested. 

TRANSFER | Page 10 



Fire rages in Kern 
County town 

LAKE ISABELLA, Calif. - A 
350-acre wildfire damaged or 
destroyed 10 homes on July 21 
and forced the evacuation of res- 
idents, officials said. 

Evacuations are under way in 
the area near Erskine Creek, 
near Lake Isabella, as the fire 
moves in a southeastern direc- 
tion, said Tomas Patlan, a 
spokesman with the Kem 
County Fire Department. It is 
not known how many homes are 
in the area and how many people 
are being evacuated, he said. 

About 75 firefighters and 
three helicopters are working to 
save homes in the area,' he 
added. No ii\juries have^been 
reported. 

The fire erupted about 2 p.m. 
and the cause is under investiga- 
tion, he said. 

Authorities are warning resi- 
dents to stay out of the area. 

Lake Isabella is about 150 
miles northeast of Los Angeles 
and about 30 miles northeast of 
Bakersfield. 



A,i 



ing city that borders San Diego, 
said Ricardo Gonzalez, who rep- 
resents Tijuana's tourist district 
on the City Council. 

The ceramic, glass or metal 
pipes, which can be used to 
smoke mar^iuana or other drugs, 
are sold along with Mexican 
blankets, pottery and other sou- 
venirs around Revolution 
Avenue, the city's main tourist 
thoroughfare. To enforce the 
ban, officials wiU rely on a little- 
used ordinance that prohibits 
the sale of items that contribute 
to 't)ad morals," Gonzalez said. 

Members of an association of 
shopkeepers have agreed not to 
fight the crackdown but some 
grumble that it will do little 
more than hurt small businesses. 

This isn't going to resolve the 
drug addiction problem," said 
Antonio Santillan, a member of 
the Association of Organized 
Businesses of Revolution 
Avenue. "They want to clean 
things up by going after the hum- 
ble people but they don't attack 
the real problem, such as closing 
the drug houses." 

Center releases 



UCLA 



. I ^ 

• grant for cell, space study 



UCLA professor receives 
presidential award 



r 



By DavkJ Zisser 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
dzjsser@)medi a. ucla.edu 



.* UCLA researches are studying 
the cell, the smallest unit of life, in 
hopes of someday developing 
. space suits that will protect astro- 
nauts fit>m radiation exposure. 

The researchers, from various 
departments at UCLA, received a 
J 14 ASA grant of $3 million per year 
« for up to ten years to start the new 
J Institute for Cell Mimetic Space 
^Exploration, where they will do 
t their research. 

*■ " ^^^WW^ ffWW^fl to lirtVti 1^Bf^"We 

.were successful m obtaining tiie 

* highly competitive NASA center," 

said Vyay Dhu, dean u^ the engi 

^ neering department. 

J "It is a recogmtion of the highest 

» jquality research we are doing and 

••of the excellent faculty we have," 



Dhir said. 

The CMISE researchers will 
combine biology with modem sci- 
entific technology by appljring 
their knowledge of the biological 
cell to space exploration. 

"Basically, we want to learn why 
nature can produce such an effi- 
cient system (a single cell) in such 
a small space," said Professor 
Chih-Ming Ho, director of CMISE. 

"Then we can expand this very 
small space to a very large space," 
he said. 

The CMISE researchers will first 
investigate how a cell stores and 

to apply what they learn tci 
improve the health monitoring of 
astronauts and develop radiation- 
resistant suits that could someday 
make hiunan travel to Mars possi- 
ble. They also hope to make space 

NASA I Page 8 



By David Zisser 

DAILY BRUIN CONTRIBUTOR 
dzisser@medla.ucla.edu 

The White House recently 
awarded UCLA professor Melissa 
Spencer, showing faith ! in her 
potential to 
help cure a 
deadly disease. 

Spencer, 
assistant pro- 
fessor in the 
department of 
pediatrics at 
the David 

Geffen ^hool 
of Medicine, 
received the 
prestUJious 
Presi(fential 

Eiarly Career Award for S<^ientists 
and Elngineers for her research on 
Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a 
disease that incapacitates patients' 




Melissa Spe: 



S<^i 



muscles by their twenties. 

"(Being awarded is) just that 
much more pressure to do some- 
thing that will impact (patients') 
lives," Spencer said. 

For winning the award, Spencer 
will receive two additional years of 
fimding from the National 
Institutes of Health to support her 
research on DMD at UCLA. 

Spencer is focusing on two 
aspects of DMD, its cause and the 
harmful intervention of the 
inunune system. Understanding the 
cause, a gene mutation, could lead 
to a cure, whereas understanding 
the role of the iimautt*^ system 
could leatl to more effective treat- 
ment -- - 

In her clinical trials, Spencer 
sees first-hand the debilitating 
effects of DMD on patients. At 
about age four, DMD patients' mus- 

DMD I Page 5 



RAVE Act meets book on Sept. 11 
strong opposition 

Opponents of anti-rave legis- 
lation in California are growing 
in numbers, gathering the 
momentum of civil liberties 
groups and a petition of more 
than 10,000 signatiu^s. 

The Reducing Americans' 
Vulnerability to Ecstasy Act was 
introduced in the state 
Legislature by Assemblywoman 
Nancy Havice, D-Bellflower. If 
passed, business owners could 
face fines and prison sentences 
for failing to prevent drug sales 
on the premises of all-night 
dance parties and musical 
events. 

Health advocates fear if busi- 
ness owners stop holding these 
events, the raves will be driven 
undergroimd and away from 
public health regulations. 



Pipe crackdown 
begins in Mexico 

TLIUANA, Mexico - Sidewalk 
vendors and curio stalls in the 
border city of Tijuana will soon 
be prohibite d from selling deco- 
rative pipes tlWiPMOMP^sed to 
consume drugs. 

Ini^)ectors will begin confis- 
cating the pipes in August as 
part of a campaign by local offi- 
cials to discoiu^e drug use and 
improve the image of the sprawl- 



A new book by the Asian 
American Studies Center fea- 
tures Asian American's perspec- 
tives on Sept. 11 and its after- 
math. 

"Asian Americans on War & 
Peace" is authored by 24 schol- 
ars, writers and activists. 

The publication is "the first 
book to respond to Sept. 11 ... 
from the vantage point of those 
whose lives and communities in 
America have been forged by 
war and peace," said Russell 
Leong, co-editor and the center's 
publications director. 

Newborns needed 
for diabetes work 

UCLA researchers are seeking 
pregnant women to enroll their 
newborn in a trial to reduce 
insulin-dependent, or T^pe I, dia- 
betes in genetically at-risk peo- 
ple. 

Researchers hope to learn 
whether avoiding intact cow 
milk proteins in the first six to 
eight months of life can 
decrease the incidence of Type I 
diabetes by age 10 in at-risk 
^ babies,^ ^.^^ .^- 

Those who are interested 
. should contact (310) 825-5487 
for more information. 



Reports from Daily Bruin wire 
services. 



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building an 18 



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Residents oppose cemetery expansion 



By Noah Grand 

DAILY BRUIN REPORTER 
ngrand(i)media.ucla.eclu 

Several Westwood homeowners 
are fighting a corporate plan to house 
tlwusaiids of corpses within feet of 
their property. 

Service Corporation International 
owns the Pierce Brothers cemetery 
on 1218 Gl^idon Ave., home to the 
0^ves of several notables, including 



Marilyn Monroe, Dean Martin, and 
Walter Matthau. The company recent- 
ly submitted a prc^)osal to build an 
18-foot-high crypt, tripling the ceme^ 
ter^s capacity to nearly 3 nm 

Neighbors said SCI is ignoring 
decency and the law in their attempt 
to expand the graveyard. They are 
joined in their (^^>osition by the fam- 
ilies of some of the individuals 
interned there. 

"At best, thi* is a vulgar display of 



raw greed," Charles Matthau, Walter's 
son, said in a letter. "At worst it is sac- 
rilegious." 

A secretary at SCI contacted on 
July 19 said no one would be avail- 
able to comment on the situation 
before July 22. In an earlier state- 
ment, SCI said it has contacted 
Westwood homeowners to assure 
that "construction will have no 

CEMETERY | Page 7 



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District Attorney 

in Runnion case 

still pondering 

penalty 

: By Chelsea J. Carter 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

STANTON, Calif. — The district attorney said 
July 21 he is reviewing whether to seek the death 
penalty against the man arrested in the kidnap and 
murder of 5-year-old Samantha Runnion. 

Alejandro Avila, 27, was scheduled to be 
arraigned July 22 on charges of abducting, sexually 
assaulting and strangling the girl, the Orange 
County prosecutor's office said. 

Orange County District Attorney Tony 
Rackauckas said he would meet with Samantha's 
family as well as Avila's attorneys before making 
the decision. 

"After I review what they have to say with my 
staff and also review the evidence, then 111 decide 

ABDUCTION I Page 5 



DAIiy BRUIN 

•i^wTEMO (tirmiA I Kditor in ChK-f 
CrKKY MrELENnr I Manajonji KdjUir " . 

Keuv Ravbiwi I Now* Editor 
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Spencer was one of 60 recipients of annual award 

p;»)?«' 8 _ the fnH»zors \v«»rr armiiui n voar iU<l rt^aixT^i -^ u.n-.it^ 11.^.,^^ i....JT\..^..^ „„* *;_• r- i ..... 



MONDAY, JULY 22, 2002 - THE O/ULY BRUIN '> 



from pago 8 
. ' ■> 
civs begin to weaken By atxnit ir>. 
they are wheelchair \xnimi. and by 
their twenties most are eoinpletely 
inca^^antated. T\\c dis<>as*^ aiTe< t.s the 
liVge nuiscles first, and eventually 
pfttients can only nun e their fingers 

HMD is ultimately fatal many 
patients lo^ U\v alnbty to breatJie 
and others die of caniia<- failure - 
and there us currently no tn^atment or 
ciju-e for the disease. •<. 

SjH»ncer was one of 60 people fo 
n4ieive the award this year l)t»spite 
her achievement. Spencer < i>ntinues 
t«1 battJe ever>-day fpLstrating chaJ- 
It^ges I^st week, two frtn^zers 
broke do\%iv resulting in tiie loss of 
thioiLsands of saniples u.so<1 in her 
n^arch. 

"We all Kvst a lot t)f work. Both of 



ABDUCTION 



the fnH»zers wen^ around a year old 
They sliouldn't have broken liown," 
Si)encer said. 

Eight federal departments and 
agencit^ nominate cjuulidates for the 
awjird, including the National 
IiLstitutes of IleidUi, wluch nominat- 
ed Spencer 

NIH selects its nominees froni 
researchers at the iHginning of their 
caAvrs 

First, ea<h of the 27 iiustitutes and 
centers that make up the NIH gets to 
nt^minate up to three candidates. 
Spencer was nominated by the 
National Institute of Artiiritis and 
Musculoskeletal Skin Diseases, 
which fluids her work 

Nominations are sent to NIH. 
whos*^ din^-tor then seUvts 12 nomi 
ntH^ to .stMid to the VVIute Hou.s«\ 

All the iiomintM^s and their fanuiii>s 



rtveiveil a ^\^lite House tour' During 
the awards ceremony at the Wliite 
HoiLS*\ lYesident Bush dehvertnl a 
.sj)ee<ii congratuhiting the tviiniers 
on tJieir acliievement and thanking 
them for their contributionsj in .sci- 
ence. 

In addition to her NIH grant for 
DMD. Sf^encer Is a recipient (>f tlirtv 
other grants, including anotJie r from 
NIH and two from the Mii.scular 
Dystrophy Asstxiation. 

Commissioned by Pr<»sident 
Clinton in 1996, the PpicASE lionors 
the extraordinary acliievements of 
yoiuig professionals beginning inde- 
pendent research careers in science 
and teclinology. I 

The award Ls intendtni tolrtvog- 
nize and suptK)rt .scientists anjd engi- 
neers who, while early in their 
research careers, show exceptional 



potential for leadership in the s<ien- 
tific conunimity. 

"Tlus Is a tremendous honor It's a 
very excliLsive club. All of our past 
winners have done tremendously 
well." said Belinda Seto. NIH repre- 
sentative to the White Houstv 

One former NIH winner went on 
to win the McArthiu" Award, an 
award given by the McArthur 
Foundation to a sele<*t group of intel- 
ligent individuals who do work for 
the good of the public. Another 
PECASE wimier went on to win the 
Nol)el Prize. 

BecaiLse of the achievements of 
previous winners. Spencer feels coin- 
pelled to meet liigli expectations. 

■ "I'm feeling a lot of pressure too to 
do something big, at least to do 
something meaningful," Spencer 
.said. 



from page 4 

whether or not to pursue the death 
penalty," Rackauckas said on 
NBC's "T(xiay" show. 

Fimeral services for Samantha 
were pending. I^te Saturday night 
her mother, Erin Runnion, broke a 
long silence and met with well- 
wishers in the courtyard of the 
townliome complex where a mas- 
sive memorial of flowers, candles, 
cards and toys has collected. 

"You are truly wonderful to us," 
she said, and warned people, 
"Take care of your babies. Take 
care of each other's babies." 

Samantha was playing with a S- 
year-old friend just yards from her 
home when a man claiming to be 
looking for a lost puppy carried 
her away, kicking and screaming. 



The swift arrest of Avila fol- 
lowed a massive effort by the 
police, press and public that began 
minutes after the first 911 call, 
Sheriff Mike Carona told the 
Associated Pre.ss July 21. 

Under the department's chilfl- 
abduction emergency alert plan, a 
Southern California aiert went out 
10 minutes after the report tliat tiie 
girl had been snatched, he said. 

"We were in everybody's front 
room, bedroom. People were see- 
ing the task force number and we 
were getting thousands of calls. 
And it was those calls that led us 
to Avila," the sheriff said. 

Carona said the department 
adopted the alert plan in 1999. It 
calls for an immediate county- 
wide law enforcement alert and 
the notification of media 







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Academic tracking under 
debate in Sacramento 



By Jessica Brice 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

SA(^RAMENT(), Calif. — A Gilroy 
high s<"h(X)l's move toward "aradoin- 
ic tracking" that prompted the sur- 
prise resignation of the school's top 
officials has stirred the debate 
among educators who say tracking 
unfairly excludes low-income and 
minority students. 

■ So-called academic tracking is a 
classification system in which stu- 
dents are placed in groups basted on 
their academic abilities, with the 
brightest kids taking separate classes 
or receiving more challenging 
cours<^work. 

Historically, students were placed 
in higli or low "tracks" in elementary 
school and stayed in those same 
groups throughout their educational 
careers. Lower tracks often focus€»d 
on vocational training rather tlian 
intense academic work. 

Although tracking has evolved 
intx) many different forms, it still 
exists around the country today, 
according to Sylvia Seidel, who nms 
a professional school development 
program for the National Education 
Association in Wasliington, D.C. 

While schools rarely categorize 
kids as high and low performing any 
more, many districts do offer contin- 
uous honors courses starting in ele- 
mentary school and running through 
high school. 

"Tracking is still one of the most 
highly debated issues," Seidel said. 
There are vestiges of it everywhere, 
but the trend is moving away from 
tracking." 

Most educators agree that stu- 



dents leani In'st when cours<' work is 
geared toward indivi<luai ability, but 
critics worry that some sturlents 
won't have equal access tf) the <lass- 
es if they Jire deenied as low aclue\ 
ing early on. 

In California, many districts say 
they are trying to focus on a tougli 
curriculum for all ki<ls. not just th»' 
briglitest few. 

So when the boiwd of tiie (iiiroy 
T'nified School Di-strict aiUM>unced 
last week that it would implement a 
pilot honors prognun tiiat includes 
separate classes for some of its 
ninth-graders, school principal 
Wendy (Judalewicz promptly 
resigned, calling the de<-ision '*nM)raI- 
ly and educationally wrong. ' 

"At our higli school, we've made 
dramatic gains. We've doubled the 
number of students gomg to college." 
Gudalewicz said. "We've met 'state 
testing) targets, ;uid all ilio sub- 
groups have mc^t the targets Wlu-n 
that happens, why put 5K>metlung in 
place that is going to tuni us back- 
ward?" 

Gudalewicz, along with Assistant 
Principals Cqc Bell and Rosa Nieto, 
resigned to protest tlie dec-Lsion, cit- 
ing fears the district is reinstating 
academic tracking. 

The ninth gracie pilot program will 
close the gap in tlie district's honors 
programs, giving priority to kids who 
took honors classes in eiglith grade 
and helping pave the way for 
Advanceci Placement classes in 11th 
and 12th grade. 

Gudalewicz maintains that low 
income or nunority kids who didn't 

TRACKING i Page 10 




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NEWS 



MONDAY. JULY 22. 2002 • TOE DULY BRUIN f 



^;i 



Regents may restructure public meetings PLAN I Regents debate status of AP classes 



•*^ 



By Robert Salonga 

DAILY BRUIN SENIOR STAFF 
rsalonga@media.ucla.edu 

SAN FRANCISCO — The 

Iniversity of California Board of 
Regents is looking to restructure its 
public meetings to "maximize effi- 
ciency," a move that could affect 
media coverage of the largest pub- 
he imiversity system in the nation 

Regent John Davies, chair of tlie 
Special Committee on Regents' 
Procedures, proposed the board 
reconsider how and when individ- 
ual comnuttee meetings are held. 

He suggested committee meet- 
ings be held in "parallel tracks," so 
they can be held simultaneously in 
different Ux^ations. Currently indi- 
vidual committee meetings - such 
as those for educational poUcy and 
finance - are based on standing 
committees, allo>\'ing regents not 
on conmiittee to participate in dis- 
cussion. 

Davies said he was seeking btiard 
consensus so IT staff could begin 
devising the specific details of the 
restructuring. 

The proposal was overwhelming- 
ly supported by the regents, since 
many felt routine oversight tasks 



like laboratory and construction 
reports did not need to be brought 
to the entire board. 

This will allow us to be extra 
efficient," said Regent Sherry 
Lansing, adding tliat more compre- 
hensive committee meetings could 
be held as a result of the restructur- 
ing. 

The regents also revised 
their public comment peri- 
od, giving the board chair - 
currently Regent John 
Moores - discretion to 
extend the time for individual 
members of the public to 
address the regents. 



"It will free us up to have sub- 
stantive issues of discussion," she 
said. 

Under the preliminary plans, 
"substantive" issues would go to 
vote before the entire board at the 
end of the two-day bi-monthly meet- 
ing. 

Regent Velma Montoya raised the 



only objection to the plan, ai^d said 
she was concerned about key com- 
mittee meetings numing concur- 
rently and preventing reporters 
from covering them effectively. 

"Most papers send only one 
reporter to cover the regents," 
Montoya said. 

But Davies said the current 
standing committee system is out- 
dated, since it hails to the inception 
of the UC in 1868. There were fewer 
regents and more frequent meetings 
- usually monthly - back then, he 
added. 

Other restructuring suggestions 
included committee chair succes- 
sion, with the vice chair of a com- 
mittee becoming chair fthe next 
year. 

The regents also revised their 
public comment period, giving the 
board chair - currently Regent John 
Moores - discretion to extend the 
time for individual members of the 
public to address the regents. 

Speaking to the regents has been 
a contentious issue between the 
public and the board. Outbursts of 
fiiistration with the regents over 
lack of time to talk has led to speak- 
ers being forcibly removed from the 
meeting on several occasions. 



A 



from page 1 



issues "dwarr those of higher edu- 
cation. 

According to the Joint 
Committee, these concerns are 
mi.splaced. 

"We just think it's a false expec- 
tation that (the UC) is going to be 
overwhelmed by K-12 issues," said 
Stephan Blake, spokesman for the 
Joint Committee. 

Despite these .concerns, the 
regents have not yet rejected 
Sacramento's proposal regarding 
the CEC. 

"We are taking a 'wait and see' 
approach," said Regent Odessa 
Johnson. 

At least one change to the joint 
conuiiittee's draft has already been 
made. According to Blake, an item 
that allowed students to "opt out" 
of college preparation courses has 
been dropped. 

This change had not been 
announced prior to the regents' 
discussion, and Regent Sherry 
Lansing worried the original draft 
allowed high school students to 
foreclose opportunities for higher 
education. 

"I have great concern about opt- 



ing out at such an early age," she 
said. 

Atkinson's letter addressed the 
Joint Committee's recommenda- 
tion to eliminate additional weigh- 
ing of AP courses. The joint com- 
mittee's conclusion was based on 
the fact that not all high schools 
offer equal opportunities to take 
AP courses. 

"The committee's reconmienda- 
tion with respect to the weighting 
of AP courses is an issue of equi- 
ty," Blake said, noting a "remark- 
able dichotomy" in the availability 
of AP courses. 

He added that for students who 
do not have access to AP classes, 
weighing AP grades for admis- 
sions purposes results in the UC 
"disadvantaging them a second 
time." 

The UC suggested that a better 
alternative would be to increase 
the availability of AP courses 
throughout the state. 

"There is an unfairness ... but 
the key to me is to get those 
schools to offer AP classes," 
Davies said. 

Among the regents, elimination 
of additional credits for AP cours- 
es would be unpopular, said 



Regent Velma Montoya. 

"I suspect there is a definite sen- 
timent to maintain the AP," she 
said. 

Montoya said that it is impor- 
tant for students to take more dif- 
ficult classes in high school. 

"We want students to take more 
challenging courses," said 
Montoya. 

However, she said policy should 
be modified to reflect the disparity 
in the availability of AP courses. 

She suggested the weighting of 
AP courses be reduced by half 
in.stead of eliminated. 

However, the Joint Committee 
said an elimination of credit would 
not negate the incentive to take 
difficult courses. 

The new policy would only 
affect admissions, students taking 
AP courses would still receive 
course credit and higher place- 
ment within the university, Blake 
said. 

"I don't think we're taking any- 
thing off the table," he said. 

The Joint Committee has not yet 
released its final draft on a new 
Master Plan. According to Blake, it 
should be out this week or in early 
August. 



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TUITION I Increase in tuition for residents may soon follow 




from page 1 

no matter how much the tuition 
was." said Ami Sri, a fourth-year cog- 
nitive science student 

She said she doesn't care that the 
money generated fiom her increased 
student fees will save the state's out- 
reach programs. 

"I still have to pay more. It doesn't 
matter why, I couldn't care less." 

Though fees for in-state students 
remain unchanged for the eighth 
straight year. Hershman warned next 
year's budget might see fmancial 
woes serious enough to warrant in- 
state student fee increases^ 

"Were going to have to get state 
money or we're going to have to con- 



sider (raising) student fees," he said. 

Besides warning that the fee hike 
would decrease diversity, some 
regents questioned the UC fee policy 
altogether. By a vote of the board in 
January, undocumented unmigrant 
students are allowed to pay in-state 
tuition if they have lived in the state 
for three years, while legal citizens 
from other states do not qualify. 

"We have the most incoherent fee 
policy on the planet It makes no 
sense," said Regent Ward Conr.erly. 

Some regents also called for an 
evaluation of the power the state leg- 
islature has over the University's 
future. Historically, student fees fluc- 
tuate in relation to the state's fiscal 
situation, with legislators raising or 



maintaining student fees depending 
on the size of budget gaps. The 
California Postsecondary EJducation 
Commission is attempting to devel- 
op a more consistent fee policy. 

"We aren't masters of our own fate 
anymore," Connerly said, '^e need 
to reexamine the political influence 
on this university." 

Student Regent Dexter Ligot- 
Gordon said nonresident student 
fees are like a pot from which legis- 
lators draw whenever they need 
money, and that there is no incentive 
to protect nonresident student.s 
when they have no capajcity to vote 
California legislators out of office. 

"When we need money, we .should 
not use this pot," Ligot-Gordon said. 



"We should say to the legislature, to 
ourselves, that we're not going to 
take advantage of these students." 

While calling himself a an "advo- 
cate for outreach," Ligot-Gordon 
cast the only dLssenting vote. 

Nonresident tuition ususdly 
increases by 4 to 5 percent per year, 
but the cost of a UC education for 
out-of-state students still falls short 
of what it costs the state to provide 
it 

VC officials said the cost of a par- 
tially state-subsidized education for 
these students is lower than in com- 
parative institutions — including the 
I iiiversity of Illinois, the University 
of Michigan and the University of 
Virginia. 



i^BnTonwiKicss 



EYE I Researchers v^ork to increase resolution in images 



from page 1 

c chip implanted in the patient's eye. 

The si^uils are then sent via radio 

requencies to the retina chip, which 

l«ceives the signals (acting like pho- 

The chip finally sends correspond- 
ijiig fiecuicai pulses tlurougl\ til\y 
electrodes connected to the chip, 
which stimulate neural responses to 
ihe brain, forming an image the blind 
^>atient sees. 

I The first such retina prosthesis 
Vas implanted into a patient five 
tnonths ago at the Retina Institute at 
tSC Medical Onter. 
j "We have been working with the 
patient to determine the best way to 
Electrically stimulate his completely 
blind retina," said Dr. Robert 
Creenberg, President and CEX) of 
Second Sight 

Currently,! the vision chip in the 
patient's eye uses a simple two- 
dimensional 4x4 matrix to simulate 
Vision. The patient can only see lines 
and shapes created by the low-reso- 
lUtion array. 

I "It allows for crude vision such as 
identifying orientation of objects and 
dnoveineiU;^," Greenberg said. 
I But Greenberg believes higher res- 
olution arrays will help future 
patients see with more detail 

"A 1,000 electrode device (30x30 



matrix) would provide a level of 
vision that most of us would consider 
adequate for everyday tasks," 
Greenbei^ said. "Even 100 electrodes 
would allow the identification of 
faces." 

(rroonberg is working with I'CLA 
electrical engmeering professor 
Jack Judy on increasing the resolu- 
tion of the current low-resolution 
array. 

Judy has experimented with 
micromachining the electrodes to 
increase their effective surface 
areas and reduce their size on the 
integrated circuit, allowing for more 
electrodes on the chip and better 
resolution. 

"The whole concept is the minia- 
turization of things," Judy said. "I'm 
focusing on miniaturizing the elec- 
trodes on the retina chip but there 
are limitations on their size." 

In order to stimulate the neurons 
in the retina, the electrodes must be 
able to deliver a certain amount of 
current Decreasing the size of the 
electrodes and keeping the current 
constant will increase the current 
density. If the current density 
increases beyond a threshold densi- 
ty, electrochemical reactions will 
occur. 

"You will have certain problems 
(past the threshold current densi- 
ty)," Judy said. "It can cause hydrol- 



ysis (gas bubbles) or even corrode 
the metal." 

Judy and Greenberg are still 
experimenting with several methods 
to increase the number of elec- 
trodes on the chip. i 

Greenberg is confident tliey will 



succeed. 

"Our effort with Professor Judy is 
an important path that may allow 
such (high-resolution) arrays," 
Greenberg said. "I am sure we will 
achieve this goal by one of the meth- 
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CEMETERY 



from page 4 

aidverse impact on the surrounding 
area 

I West Los Angeles zoning regula- 
tions state a mausoleum caxmot be 
built within 300 feet of residential 
property, but SCI is asking the City 
Plaimer for a waiver to build all the 
vfay to property lines as a "public 
benefit project" 

+ The City Planning department may 
ike a final decision on July 25. 
They expect to compromise 
somewhere between the outrageous 
ami the law," said lily Young, who 
lives next to the cemetery. 

City plamier Jon Foreman reconv 
mended that SCI build only the small- 
ef of two proposed mausoleums, 
which would hoW 475 bodies. 

Young said she would not be sur- 
prised if the corporation was given 
everything it wanted because of its 
^ ?rior financial resources. 

bn it^ Web site, the Texas-based 

:i describes itself as "tlie largest 
provider of funeral and cemetery ser- 
vices in North America" The compa- 
ny had revenue of $2.5 billion in 2001. 

Charles Matthau said he paid 
$175,000 to bury his father in tlie 
small Westwood cemetery and he 
thinks this plan goes over the line. 

I "Now, we understand that they are 
nit content simply to gouge the griev- 
ir^ families," C liaries said. They are 
attempting to turn the place into a 
large scale, Kmart/amusement park." 

Lila Rioth — another cemetery 
m ighbor who is also a board member 



of the Westwood Homeowners 
Association — said SCI is using its 
corporate muscle to gain special 
treatment 

"When I work as an architect my 
residential clients are not allowed to 
do this," Rioth said. 

Residents have tried to get City 
Councilntan Jack Weiss, whose Flflh 
District includes Westwood, to fight 
against the cemetery's expansion. 

On April 15, Weiss sent a letter to 
Foreman saying the proposed struc- 
ture is too large for the area and 
neglects landscape bu£fer zones. 

But now Weiss favors Foreman's 
recommendation for limited expan- 
sion, according to spokeswoman Lisa 
Hansen. 

"They did get (Weiss's) approval 
for a building but not for everything, 
which was a victory for the commu- 
nity," Hansen said 

Rioth said she expected the coun- 
cilman's support in fighting against 
expansion and maintaining current 
zoning laws. 

As a condition for building, Weiss 
wants SCI to build a wall between the 
graveyard and neighbors' homes. 

Neighbors can cuitently look into 
the cemetery from their backyards. 
They asked for the cemetery's previ- 
ous owners to build a wall 50 years 
ago, but it has never been built 

"Nobody ever said anything for 
years and years because we all lived 
with mutual respect," said neighbor 
Tkmmy Hofife. "But now we have 
these Texas guys who live with the 
bottom line." 



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B THE DAILY BRUIN • MONDAY. JULY 

NASA 



from page I 

Shuttle energy resources more effi- 
cient. 

Ho said the single cell is a logical 
Starting point for CMISE research 
He described the cell as a complex 
factory that produces molecules 
With specific functions in a tiny 

ace. 



sp 



22. 2002 

The idea, Ho said, is to m^hc the 
whole space engineering system 
store and process information 
more like nature. 

Many of CMISE's developments 
will take place in sterile clean- 
r<K)m environments, an important 
resource provided by the 
( alifomia NanoSystems Institute, a 
joint enterprise of UCLA and UC 
Santa Barbara. 

The goal of the project is to to 
forge a relationship between the 
academic community and NASA, 



NEWS 



according to Michael Reischman, 
director of university programs at 
NASA. 

Reischman added that the focus 
on educating young engineers and 
scientists is an important aspect of 
the program, given NASA's "man- 
power problem." its shortage of 
trained aerospace scientists. 

A panel of scientists and engi- 
neers'^from government, industry 
and academia from universities 
across the country, chose CMISE 
from 12 other proposals based on 



several criteria. 

The evaluating criteria included 
the quality of the proposed 
research and education plan, quali- 
ty of the faculty, relevance of pro- 
posed work, ability to manage such 
work and potential to grow into a 
self-sustaining program. 

The grant money will come from 
the Computing, Information, and 
Communications Technology 

Program at the NASA AMES 
Research Center, which will over- 
see the day-to-day management of 



CMISE. 

"We are anticipating a close rela- 
tionship," said Eugene Tu, the pro- 
gram manager of CICT. "AMES has 
expertise in the areas of biotech- 
nology, information technology 
and nanotechnology. " 

The fusion of these three areas, 
Tu said, will be important in solv- 
ing some of NASA's nirrent prob- 
lems. 

The CMISE faculty includes 
researchers who are leaders in var- 
ious fields such as biological sci- 



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ences and engineering. 

Of the 15 faculty members 
involved, two are Nobel laureates 
and three are "academy members," 
a top science honor, according to 
Ho. 

"These faculty members have 
track records of turning scientific 
dreams into reality," Ho said. 

If some of the dreams of CMISE 
sound far-fetched, that's fine with 
Ho. 

"We believe only the crazy ideas 
are interesting," Ho said. 



TENURE I Vice 
chancellor 
states likely 
meeting with 
protesters 

from page 1 

other professors - Mitchell Maid 
and Karin Elliot-Brown - to 
CSULA. Protesters noted both pro- 
fessors are also people of color. 

Agbayani-Siewert, meanwhile, 
could not be contacted after 
numerous phone calls and e-mails. 
Enrile, whose doctoral advisor 
was Agbayani-Siewert and who 
had a key to the professor's office, 
said Agbayani-Siewert was in the 
hospital during the time of the 
rally, but she did not know why. 



"We're collectively 
appalled here. If this is 
our public institution 
then we are morally 
corrupt if we do not 
hold it accountable." 

Mark Pulido 
1992 USAC President 



A statement from Donna 
Vredevoe, UCLA's Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Personnel, stated, 
"UCLA regrets that Associate 
Professor Pauline Agbayani- 
Siewert has chosen to leave 
UCLA." 

Vredevoe worked with Barbara 
Nelson, Dean of the SPPSR, in 

rn.ittors relafcd fo refrntio/i afftT'^ 
Lo A^bayaiu-^iewert, the state- 
ment stated. 

"As a matter of policy, these 
matters are confidential," the 
statement stated. " ... The final 
decision to leave UCLA was made 
by Dr. Agbayani-Siewert." 

A similar statement from Nelson 
expressed regret Agbayani- 
Siewert was leaving and did not go 
into the specifics of the retention 
offer. 

Though the administration was 
mostly silent, concerned students 
and community members were 
not. Supporters of Agbayani- 
Siewert claim, among other asser- 
tions, UCLA let her go because the 
UCLA administration thought 
CSULA was not a competitive 
school with UCLA and therefore 
did not warrant a retention offer. 

"What is this?" shouted Enrile 
into a microphone. 

"It's a farce," answered one per- 
son in the crowd. 

"It's crap," said another. 
"It's bullshit," said a third. 
Ralliers held signs reading 
"Dean Nelson we know what you 
did this summer," and "Apology 
and Resignation Now." They chant- 
ed "No justice. No peace," and 
"Dean Nelson, out of UCLA." 

"We're collectively appalled 
here," said Mark Pulido, who was 
president of the Undergraduate 
Students Association Council in 
1992 and president of Samahang 
Pilipino before. 

Pulido challenged ralliers, say- 
ing "If this is our public institution 
then we are morailly corrupt if we 
do not hold it accountable." 

Current USAC acadenuc affairs 
commissioner Chris Diaz attended 
the rally and said USAC has not 
passed any resolution condenming 
or supporting the administration 
and their possible role in 
Agbayani-Siewert's departure, but 
said they may do so sometime 
down the road. 

Diaz expressed his rancor over 
Agbayani-Siewert's departure at 
USAC's July 8 meeting, saying it is 
important for the council to sup- 
port increased faculty diversity. 

After loading up a CSULA.- 
bound car with Agbayani-Siewert's 
books, binders and personal sup- 
plies, ralliers headed to Murphy 
Hall to request a meeting with the 
Chancellor regarding their con- 
cerns. 

Since Chancellor Albert 
Camesale was at the UC Board of 
Regents meeting in San Francisco, 
a few students met with Vice 
Chancellor of the Graduate 
Division Claudia Mitchell-Keman, 
Enrile said. 

According to Enrile, Mitchell- 
Kernan said the chancellor would 
likely be able to schedule a meet- 
ing with concerned students soon. 



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Implications 

of new SAT 

hotly debated 

by experts 



By Michelle Locke 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

I BERKELEY, Calif. — The deci- 
sijon to add a written essay to the 
H-idely taken SAT college entrance 
etani has raist»d new questions. 

Can someone from a home where 
artother lan^^iage is spoken whip 
oat pohshed prose in English in 25 
minutes' If not. does that mean he 
or she does not deserve to go to a 
conipetiti\'e college? 

"The time limit is particularly dif- 
ficult for kids who have to translate 
in their head." says Robert 
Schaeffer of Fair Test. a 
Massachusetts-based group that 
advocates less reliance on standard- 
ized tests. In the real worid of col- 
lege, he argues, "if you HTite slowly 
or need a dictionary or have to stay 
up all night, you can do it." 

On the other hand, the writing 
te« "gets at real behavior." and the 
abtljty to speak, read and write in 
English is key to undergraduate 
success, says Wayne Camara, vice 
president for research at the 
College Board, the New York-based 
notiprofit that owns the SAT. 

The SAT changes were prompted 
wken UC President Richard 
Atkinson proposed dropping the 
SAT With 150.000 undergrads, UC is 
tht test's biggest user. 

VC facult>' proved reluctant to go 
tem-free. suggesting the develop- 
ment of a new exam, a plan that 
never really flowered. Meanwhile, 
the College Board and Iowa-based 
ACT, Inc., makers of the rival ACT 
entrance exam, made changes. 

ACT is adding an essay for 
California students only, its officials 
are still working on the format. 

The point is not to keep English- 
leaimers out of college, but to mea- 
sure their ability to write, says ACT 
spokesman Ken Gullette. "They will 
need the skills, so to measure the 
skills and to give them information 
to help them improve their skills is 
a good thing." Gullette said. 

The SAT makeover, which includ- 
ed dropping the often criticized 
analogy section and making math 
questions tougher, was heralded by 
Atkinson as "a transforming event 
in the nature of education." 

.'^ ' .11 ffie AsJ.u! .\inorir.an I>egaJ 
L>eft»nse and Education hXind, exec- 
uuut oucciui NLirgaret Fung has 
heard from several concerned par- 
ent^ and students. 

•^It's clear that Asian families 
want to be sure their children speak 
English. It just seems as if that 
(eafeiy requirement) may put people 
at a disadvantage," she says. 

At the Mexican American Legal 
Defense and Educational Fund, offi- 
cials say it is too soon to know if the 
new requirement will be a problem, 
"bu(t at a minimum we Imow the 
essay will not improve the situa- 
tion," says attorney Victor 
V'iramontes. "The older version of 
the! SAT discriminates against 
English-learners and on its face the 
chafiges do not address the prob- 
lem" 

A 2001 College Board report 
found that students whose first 
language was not English had a 
mean score of 455 on the SAT ver- 
bal test, compared to a mean score 
of 517 for those who spoke English 
first. 

The report also found that stu- 
dents from Latino or Asian back- 
groimds in general had lower ver- 
bal scores than white students. 

The ethnic makeup of students 
admitted has been a hot-button 
issue at UC, where race-based 
admissions have been banned 
sinde 1998. 

Ttie number of black and Latino 
students dropped sharply inunedi- 
ately after the ban, especially at 
highly competitive UC Berkeley 
and UCLA. Since then, the mim- 
ber3 have increased, although VC 
Berkeley still admits far fewer 
black students. 

Meanwhile, Asian Americans, 
who did not benefit from affirma- 
tive! action, comprise the largest 
singje group at four of UC's eight 
undergraduate campuses; at one of 
tho^e, \JC Irvine, they are at 55 
per(?ent the majority of the student 
body. Statewide, Asian Americans 
makje up about 11 percent of the 
population. 

UC Berkeley ethnic studies pro- 
fessor Ling-Chi Wang says he has 
heai]d from some who worry that 
the emphasis on writing is a way to 
boost diversity by curbing admis- 
sion of Asian Americans. 

U^ and testing officials deny 
that.: 

Wfcmg. meanwhile, says he is not 
troubled by the issue, because "I 
personally strongly support the 
i\oU<^n of diversity," and because 
he expects Asian Americans will 
meet the new challenge. 

Sqme think it's a bad idea to put 
too i much faith in testing, 
revaluped or not. 

UC has switched to "compre- 
heiL^ve review" admissions which 
meaj|is they can consider hardships 
a sti^ent has overcome. 



H 



NEWS 



MONDAY, JULY 22, 2002 • THE DAILY BRUM 



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LJ 



MEETING 

from page 1 

"If there are no consequences to 
underage drinking ... (students) 
won't worry about it," said Tony 
Moulallem, manager of Club 
California apartments. 

In response to the complaints of 
Christopher Neal, External Vice 
President for the Undergraduate 
Students Association Council, said 
residents could voice their con- 
cerns with student government. 
Neal also disagreed with residents 
who want UCLA to hold back 
degrees. 

"I am wary of attaching some- 
one's diploma to maybe a drunk 
night at a bar," Neal said. 

Neal also said since the universi- 
ty has no jurisdiction off campus, it 
cannot puiush students for what 
they do in their homes or on the 
streets. 

Several of those attending said 
they bear no ill-will toward the gen- 
eral student population. 

"We do not hate students. OrJy 1 
out of 100 are a problem," said 
Debbi Cowen, a Westwood apart- 
ment owner and resident "We have 
fabulous residents. What you are 
hearing is frustration. These prob- 
lems have been going on for years." 

Additionally, residents demanded 
the police increase patrols in 
Westwood Thursday through 
Saturday nights and arrest underage 
drinkers. 

But the LAPD cannot arrest every 
troublemaker or go to every frater- 
nity party, said Michael Wang, LAPD 
senior lead officer and 1990 UCLA 
graduate. 



"Let's be realistic. This is a col- 
lege town. I dont think we can be 
policing every single under-age 
driiUcer," he said. 

The residents also voiced griev- 
ances over noise pollution. A few 
said they had called the police to 
file a complaint, but the police were 
slow to or never responded. 

"I don't understand why the 
municipal codes are not enforced," 
said Kevin Salitino, who lives on 
Strathmore Avenue, adding that fra- 
ternity houses often have amplified 
music and live bands, which require 
a special permit. 

Regardiing noise violations and 
and other misdemeanor infractions, 
officer Wang said there is often too 
much bureaucratic red tape 
involved with eitforcement. Also, 
the LAPD is usually busy dealing 
with more serious crimes such as 
murder, T2ipe and robbery, he said. 

"Our hands are tied," Wang said. 

Officer Wang said the police 
respond to every call, but some- 
times are slow to file a noise com- 
plaint. 

Nevertheless residents believe 
excessive noise is detrimental to 
quality of life in Westwood. 

"When I called the UC Police, the 
dispatcher said 'Could you turn 
down the music in your house.' I 
said, 'It's not my house, that's the 
party.' 'Oh my God,' she said. The 
party was a block and a half away," 
said Salatino, describing the noise 
volume of fraternity parties. 

One UCLA student attending the 
meeting said he had been unaware 
of how disgruntled many permanent 
residents have become. 

"I didn't realize members of the 
community felt that way," said Mike 
Huber of Alpha Tao Omega 



Taylor believes absentee apart- 
ment owners who neglect their 
properties are a significant part of 
the problem. According to Taylor, 
as many z^artments have no on-site 
managers and are poorly main- 
tained, student tenants show little 
respect for where they live. 

"It doesn't foster pride and a con- 
nection to the neighborhood. That 
is what's lacking," Taylor said. "It's 
hard to be disrespectflil of someone 
else's property if you know them." 

Taylor fears that if apathetic atti- 
tudes toward Westwood persist, the 
neighborhood will deteriorate until 
it becomes another "student slum" 
similar to Isla Vista, an area adja- 
cent to UC Santa Barbara long noto- 
rious for noise and inebriated stu- 
dents. 

The NVIC plans to work with 
Scott Carter, haison of UCLA 
Fraternities and Sororities, and 
organize "Row Walks." The focus of 
these walks will be to let the frater- 
nities located along Gayley Avenue, 
or "FYat Row," know they are part of 
a community with permanent resi- 
dents and address notable prob- 
lems. 

"It's just so people will know 
their neighbors," Taylor said. 

Among the myriad issues resi- 
dents had concerning students, 
abandoned couches, mattresses and 
other "bulky items" cluttering side- 
walks was a prominent agitation. 

"It's kind of trashy," said Condre. 

Taylor noted the city will pick up 
couches for free, but students need 
to notify the Department of Public 
Works in order to to have them do 
so. 



Th£ Department of Public Works can 
be contacted at 1 (800)773-CITY 



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TRANSFER I Mentors push 
Students to be self-sufficient 



www.sacredmovement.com 

245 South Main Street, Venice, CA 90291 
info@sacredmovement.com 

(310)450-7676 




from page 8 

"It's a wonderful experience to 
live in the dorms. It gives us the 
opportunity to meet a lot of new 
people," said Roosevelt High School 
senior Mayra Caldera who was a 
part of SITE Math and Science 2002. 
"As mentors we build a network 
and friendships that are going to last 
for life. We have a passion for what 
we do," said Susana Campo- 
Confreras, a mentor for the SIP pro- 
gram, a 16-day, three-uiut course col- 
laboration with Eiast Los Angeles 
College, West Los Angeles College 
ai)d the Youth Oj^xMtunity 
Movement 

Campo-Contreras immigrated 
from Guatemala when she was 
eleven, and later transferred from 
Santa Monica City College and grad- 
uated from UCLA this June. Campo- 
Contreras feels that the barriers she 
has overcome have made her a 
strong and determined person, 
which is what she teaches the stu- 
dents she mentors. 

"The lack of information and the 
lack of good, competent counselors 
is the biggest challenge a community 
college student has to go through to 
go to a four year college," Campo- 
Contreras said. 

Many of the students who partici- 
pated in the transfer programs said 
they were told by school administra- 
tors they could never make it to a 
UC. 

Before entering the SFFE 2000 
program, Jonathan Joseph Muiioz 
said he was planning to take his 
counselor's suggestion and take 
some time off of school. 

"That's when everybody, especial- 
ly my mentor (Maria Lucero Ortiz), 
encouraged me not to give up. They 



made me believe in myself when I 
was at a point where I didn't believe 
in myself. It was eye opening to see 
there are so many opportunities out 
here," said Munoz, who now volun- 
teers with CCCP 

"What we try to get across is that 
you need to be your own advocate 
and that education is what you make 
of it," said Ortiz, SITE mentor 

Blankenship's wish to see her 
father in the audience of proud par- 
ents as she received her high school 
diploma was shattered when her 
father died a few years ago. 
Blankenship wanted to drop out of 
sdiool but her mother encouraged 
her to follow her dream to tlie end. 

"It's too much pressure. But I try 
my best to go to schooL My goal is to 
walk across the high school stage 
just to say I did it," Blankenship said. 

Students who did not attend 
UCLA after high school have found 
encouragement in being part of the 
outreach programs. 

"Anyone can do it, anyone who 
has the ganas can do it," said Omar 
OUva, SIFE Math and Science 2002 
participant 

Even though the SFFE and SIP 
programs will end this summer, 
mentorship and the support system 
continue during the year. Programs 
such as MEChA Calmecac, the 
Pilipino Thmsfer Student Program 
and the Student TVansfer Outreach 
Mentorship Program enable UCLA 
students to help each other, said 
Lestor Baron. 

"Outreach never stops," he said. 

For more informatiori about transfer 
programs at UCLA visit 
httpJ/wwu. admissions, ucla. edu/pro 
spect/admjr. htm 




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TRACKING 

from page 6 

get into honors classes eariy on 
would have trouble breaking into 
them in high schooL 

The program, which will start this 
fall, was approved after a group of 
parents turned in a petition with 
more than 200 signatures and 
packed school board meetings push- 
ing for the change. 

Jackie Caldwell, who is sending 
her 14-year-old son, Austin, to a pri- 
vate school rather than Gilroy High 
so he would have more challenging 
classes, said tracking is not about 
race. 

"As an African-American, I sup- 
port the program," said Caldwell, 
who is a member of the parent group 
that turned in the petition. "Both my 
husband and I were tracked in the 
'60s and 70s, and we do not see this 
a race issue." 

Caldwell, who attended California 
public schools all her life, says the 
move away from tracking hurts high- 
performing students. 

"We have a daughter in junior high 
who is also a high achieving stu- 
dent," Caldwell said. "We're waiting 
to see if the curriculum is going to be 
changed before deciding if she goes 
(to Gilroy High). They would have to 
have an honors program if she did." 

Gilroy Superintendent Edwin Diaz 
said he is concerned that some par- 
ents will choose to pull their kids out 
of public schools unless the schools 
offers classes for higher-achieving 
students. 



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VIEWPOINT 



MONDAY, JULY 22. 2002 • THE DAILY BmiW 



11 



DAILY BRUIN 

Sennrig the UCLA comw unity sijice 1919 . • 
Editorial Board 

CiAi HTEMiH Ortkga, Editor tn Chief < 

Corey MiElenev. Managing Editor 

Com Cass, Vxeupoxyit Editor ^ 

Kelly Raybirn. News Editor 
EnwARD Chiao. Staff Representative 

Amy Frye, StaJJ Representative 
Derek Lazzard, Sta^f Representative 
'. Staff Representative 
.-: .... ..„. St(^ Representative 



NVIG must work with 
students for change 

The North Village Improvement Committee, dedicated 
to cleaning up Westwood, last week presented 
impractical proposals to deal with students Uving in 
the village. Among these were punishing rowdy residents 
by imposing academic penalties and going after sticker 
manufacturers if any of their merchandise is found plas- 
tered on pubhc property. 

Tlie problem is UCLA cannot hold students' acade- 
mics accountable for acts conunitted off campus - and 
the sticker proposal is a clear violation of n[\anufactur- 
ers' first amendment rights to free speech. 

Property owners routinely claim they don't want 
Westwood to deteriorate into Isla Vista, which sur- 
rounds UC Santa Barbara and is known for being a 
crazy party place. Instead, they want Beverly Hills - 
which would be fine if Westwood didn't have 24,000 20- 
somethings making up a bulk of the local population. A 
village with this kind of demographic makeup will never 
be able to go toe-to-toe with a town as affluent and 
sedated as Beverly Hills for the nicest in Los Angeles. 

With that in mind, property owners and managers 
need to take a second look at their expectations of the 
North Village. Instead of berating students for the 
thrice-yeariy midiught yell or for trash strewn on the 
streets, a compromise should be reached. Students 
would be much more likely to take good care of the 
neighborhood, for instance, if they were solicited for 
ii^ut 

Ignoring students won't help them feel attached to 
their neighborhood, especially since they already have 
to deal with expensive and often pKXjrly maintained 
apaftments which make their Westwood experience a 
bitter one as it is. After all, homeowners have succeed- 
ed in nuddng Westwood less fun, virtually eliminating 
dancing (see the Gypsy and Habibi cafes) and adult 
merchandise (Zone d'Erotica ... or Amour as they call it 
now). Remaining local businesses have the student 
body to thank for keeping them afloat - an economy 
with such an oppressive stance against entertainment 
would flounder under normal circumstances. 

At the same time, this doesn't excuse students from 
taking care of the neighborhood they reside in; regard- 
leas of the brevity of their stay, everyone has a civic 
responsibility to their community. The NVIC should 
invite students to meetings, but students themselves 
should proactively attend the public gatherings and 
voice their concerns and defend their interests. 
Whimalcai stories about Westwood's golden years when 
students wont to clas» in shiit-and-tie get old £ast, but 

'htT** IS sitmt' tnith u\ tlwir rnessa|?e: students' lark of 

ref?peot for their neighborhood has led to a run-ctown 
community. 

More disturbing than Westwood's lack of aesthetic 
appeal, though, is the NMC's apparent disregard for stu- 
dents' right to an education. To suggest penalizing them 
academically for misbehavior in Westwood is no more 
outlandish than suggesting local homeowners lose their 
prc^jerty rights for unpaid pau-king tickets. 

Until homeowners start taking partial responsibility 
for the problems plaguing Westwood and con^)romise 
on reasonable solutions with students, couches will 
continue to find a home on Gayley Avenue and no stu- 
dent will care. 



dentjwiJ 
Unsiilned 



represert a m^jonty opinion of the Daly Bruin 
Edtorial Board. Al other coiumns. letters and artwork represent 
the opinions of their authors. 



Weiss' submission in 






opposition to Valley, 

Hollywood is both 

inaccurate, self-serving 



BREAKING UP SAN FERNANDO 

WILL EMPOWER AND IMPROVE, 

NOT WEAKEN THE AREA 

By Kevin Williams 

On July 15, Councilman Jack Weiss had a Viewpoint 
piece published in the Daily Bruin in which he 
attempted to convince the UCLA community of the 
evils of the Valley/Hollywood secession movement , 
with misinformation and semantic dribble. As a resi- 
dent of the Valley, 1 would like to set these facts 
straight and provide a balanced view of the issue that 
was clearly missing in the July 15 front-page article 
and Weiss' Viewpoint piece. 

Weiss first claims the creation of the new cities 
would mean city services (police, fire, etc.) would be 
contracted from Los Angeles to the new cities. While 
it is true that during the transition prbcess (a period 
projected to be 18 months), the Valley city would con- 
tract Los Angeles for some services, the new city will 
be empowered to create its own police and fire 
departments, at which time those contracted services 
would no longer be needed. 

Weiss also suggests the secession would create new 
bureaucracy. Nothing could be further from the truth. 
The new city would have far less bureaucracy, and the 
city council would be far more accountable with each 
councilman representing fewer than 100,000 people 
(as opposed to 250,000 per councilman in Los 

Anizeles). 

As for the "Valimony" Weiss claims would cause the 
new city to raise taxes or reduce services, it shouldn't 
be a problem. We in the Valley are used to the leech- 
ing. But at least this leeching will be incrementally 
reduced and eventually eliminated. In fact, as the 
Valley is freed from Los Angeles, residents can expect 
lower taxes and improved services. 

There are 87 independent cities surrounding Los 

WILLIAMS I Page 13 



Court targets wrong students for drug tests 



In yet another misguided attempt to 
toil I the tide of the United States' 
mostly ineffectual war on drugs, the 
U.S. Supreme Court ruled recently that 
high school students participating in 
extracurricular activ- 
ities could be singled 
out for random drug 
testing. However, in 
an illogical distinc- 
tion, their non- 
involved counter- 
parts would not be 
subjected to any 
such tests. 

The case, which 
made its way to the 
Supreme Court 

after an honor roll _ 

student singing in " 

the Tecumseh High School choir felt 
her rights were violated when forced 
to take a urine test (which she 
passed), significantly expands the 
drug-testing criteria to include not 




Ian Eisner 

BlBna^)mBCiiuiaadu 



only student athletes but students par- 
ticipating in any kind of school-related 
activity. Already dealing with a tenu- 
ous link between recreational drug use 
and sports-related injury, the Supreme 
Court's decision in Board of Education 
v. Earls effectively stretched the stan- 
dard of applicability to potentially 
include an additional 24 million stu- 
dents involved in extra-scholastic 
activities. 

Heralded by some anti-drug cru- 
saders as a stinging blow against sub- 
stance abuse, Americans are left to 
sleep easy knowing the array of drug 
problems accompanying chess and 
math team members will be eradicated 
via the random urine test. 

This, of course, is a false sense of 
security less j^t than the phrase "Just 
Say No." Drug testing as a price for 
participation in extracurriculars flunks 
the logic test because students 
involved in these activities are the 
lea^t likely group to use drugs. In the 



Tecumseh High case, over 500 students 
were tested for drugs with only three 
students testing positive for illegal 
drug use. In a broader study cited by 
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her 
dissent, lOth-graders participating in 
extracurricular activities are 50 per- 
cent less likely to do drugs. 

At a far greater risk for potential 
drug use are students not participsUing 
in school activities. But under the cur- 
rent Supreme Court-sanctioned prac- 
tice, these high-risk students are 
excluded from testing, leaving year- 
book staffs and homemaker clubs to 
be unfairly subjected to intrusive test- 
ing. Perhaps the next step is to ran- 
domly search the lockers of students 
taking part in extracurricular activities 
(and bypass the lockers of non-partici- 
pants). 

It is a glaring double standard that 
wiU ultimately hinder the anti-drug 
effort. The selective-testing movement 
threatens the privacy of students least 



likely to do drugs, while at the same 
time driving high-risk students away 
from extracurricular activities, which : 
may be the key to ameliorating drug 
problems. 

Proponents of this brand of testing 
argue students "can refuse the test by 
not participating in these extra- 
scholastic activities." But with studies 
repeatedly indicating involvement in a 
team or club is one of the best combat- 
ants against substance abuse, students 
should not be forced to make such a 
decision. The goal should be to attract 
drug users to extracurriculars, not 
send them miming the other directioiL 

Like so many previous efforts in 
America's war on drugs, extracurricu- 
lar drug testing falls far from the tar- 
get. By subjecting students least prone 
to substance abuse, the only thing this 
new campaign will curb is student pri- 
vacy. And for students confix>nting 
these tests, just saying no is not an 
option. 



Program assistants intrude, 
limit individual relationships 



^^^, 



Michelle 
Singer 



The concept of a program assistant on 
residence hall floors is an excellent one. 
But as with many other good ideas, 
incoming freshmen should know it does not 
live up to Its expectations. 

The hypothetical PA creates bulletin 
boards (both decorative 
and informative), puts 
together floor activities, 
and either conducts or 
participates in floor 
meetings. The PA is 
viewed as second in 
command to the resident 
assistant and is, there- 
fore, an authority figure. 

The reality of the situ- 
ation is somewhat differ- 
ent though. Life under a 
PA is not all fun and 
games. At the beginning 
of the year, when new 
students want to feel a 
connection with other people, large group 
activities do little to further any sort of 
meaningful conununication. 

Although big groups can be great to begin 
interaction, the one-on-one conversations 
that help students form lasting friendships 
are inhibited by the constant flow of pro- 
grams one is pressured into attending. 

Persona] bonding, therefore, comes at a 
later date than it would without the PA's 
meddlesome programs. Furthermore, people 
find an outlet in these programs and feel 
connected and included, so they may not 
pursue individual relationships to their full 
extent because of the fake sense of fulfill- 
ment they are getting from floor programs. 
This is not to say the programs are not fun, 
but they may hinder the formation of impor- 
tant friendships for longer than necessary. 

The bulletin boards the PA puts up are 
designed to create a colorful, fun environ- 
ment as well as to spark conversation. 
Overall, the concept of a PA is encouraging - 



who wouldn't want a fiiendly student to plan 
social events and make the dorm atmos- 
phere more positive? 

Another downside to PAs is the self-right- 
eous attitudes stemming fixjm their higher 
place in the housing hierarchy than the regu- 
lar resident The dorm caste system causes 
some students to feel forced to attend pro- 
grams that are not mandatory and may con- 
flict with other more important activities. 
However, because the resident must live in 
the halls and deal with the PA on a daily 
basis, he feels coerced into attending. This 
not only leads to an unhappy resident but 
also drags down the program because many 
participants would rsUher not be present 

As the year goes on, the PA is needed less. 
Yes, the buDetin boards continue to decorate 
the atmosphere, but the real reason the hall 
has begun to feel like a home is the fiiend- 
ships that have been formed. People become 
capable of creating their own fun and are in 
much less need of a PA to bring together the 
floor and provide entertainment To some 
the programs are still a source of fun and 
good times, but for others, both the pro- 
grams and the PA have simultaneously lost 
their value. This is not entirely the fault of 
the PA - housing deserves some of the fault 
for requiring a certain number of programs 
to be held in all quarters and does not lessen 
this requirement as tl\e year progresses. This 
could be rectified by a change in the rules, 
allowing for more flexibility and caBing for 
the judgment of the individual PA as to 
whether or not holding another program is 
appropriate. 

As with all positions, people who become 
PAs will be disliked by some and loved by 
others, and with this comes a desire to make 
as many people as possible happy. But this 
should clue PAs into the fact that they 
should not hassle those who do not want to 
participate, or make them feel obligated to 
attend programs which they would rather 
not attend. 



Divestment petition flawed, 
misreads international law 

ARGUMENT BASED ON UNFOUNDED ACCUSATIONS, 
FAILS TO ADDRESS CONSEQUENCES OF PLAN 



By Mattt)ew Knee 

Recently, the Daily Bruin published a 
misinformed editorial advocating the 
University of California Regents divest 
from all corporations with investments in 
Israel. The Bruin put forth a flawed argu- 
ment to support an already indefensible 
petition advocating one-sided economic 
warfare and ignoring the dualities of the 
Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 

The Bruin promotes this imbalanced 
divestment policy for the UC system 
because they find it 

unfair to indirectly 

support Israel with- 
out unanimous tax- 
payer consent. 
However, the only 
near-unanimity to 
be found in this 
country is in votes 
by our democratic 
institutions pledg- 
ing full support for 
Israel. 

In the past few months, resolutions in 
the House and Senate, passed by 352-21 
and 94-2 margins respectively, provided 
virtually unqualified support for Israel. 
Also, the Homeland Security Bill in the 
House allocates $200 million directly to 
Israel to defray the costs of their recent 
anti-terrorist operations in the territories. 

Because only 1 1 percent of Americans 
sympathize primarily with the Palestinians, 
these decisions are consistent with the 
democratic mandate of our nation, where 
individual opinions do not have veto 
power over governmental actions. 

Even the Supreme Court has ruled stu- 
dents could not prevent their student fees 
at state universities from being used to 
support political organizations with which 
they do not agree. If the most dedicated of 



The divestment petition 
selectively quotes and 
misrepresents international 
law in order to exaggerate 
Israeli culpability. 



the People for the Ethical Treatment of 
Animals activists are forced to fund and 
support medical experiments on animals, 
why should we be denied the opportunity 
to invest university funds in Israel? 

The editorial board also advocates boy- 
cotting a Palestinian state, if it existed, but 
fails to recognize the fact that other Arab 
states do far more to promote terrorism 
than the virtually banlaiipt Palestinian 
Authority. Does the "neutral" editorial 
board advocate boycotting those states, 
too? If so, where wiU Califomians get their 
petroleum? 

The divestment petition 
selectively quotes and mis- 
represents international law 
in order to exaggerate or 
even fabricate Israeli culpa- 
bility on three specific 
points. 

Firstly, it accuses Israeli 
j officials of "legal torture" 

I against Palestinians, but 

torture is in fact illegal in Israel. However, 
occasional violations of police brutality 
laws, while condenmable, do inevitably 
occur, as they do in democracies world- 
wide, including the United States. 

Secondly, it accuses Israel of violating 
United Nations Security Council 
Resolution 194, which is now moot, having 
been replaced by UNSCR 242. 

Lastly, the petition accuses Israel of vio- 
lating UNSCR 242, which is often the cor- 
nerstone of arguments demanding Israeli 
withdrawal from Palestinian land. 

UNSCR 242 demands Israel return the 
"territories seized" in the defensive Six 
Day War of 1967. This language, proposed 
by the United States, was, after much 
debate, adopted over a Soviet proposal 
suggesting "the territories" and an Arab 

KNEE I Page 13 




How far would you go to keep your little princess safe? 



JASON LIU/Daily Bruin 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Divestment would punish wrong side 

As a UCLA alumnus, I read with great concern the July 8 Daily 
Bruin editorial *UC must respect human rights, divest" and the 
"Special Letter from the Editor" that followed on July 15. 

As a congressman, I supported sanctions against South Africa, 
which helped bring down apartheid, and the law which pressured 
the Soviet Union to aUow freedom of emigration. But the idea, s\ip- 
ported by The Bruin, to sanction Israel for the failure to achieve 
peace in the Middle East would punish the only democratic coun- 
try in the region which respects human rights and has been willing 
to do everything it can for peace (except conmiit suicide). The sad 
fact is the Palestinian and Arab leaders have rejected peace, resort- 
ed to terrorism and the murder of innocent civilians because they 
are unwilling to live alongside a Jewish state of Israel The United 
States should not punish Israel but continue to pressure the Arab 
world toward democracy and to accept a seciu^ Israel living along- 
side a peaceful Palestine. 

Henry Wuonan 
Untted States ooo^'essman 

Ignore critics, divestment justified 

Your July 8 editorial "UC must respect human rights, divest," is a 
brave and progressive step toward peace and justice in the bat- 
tered Middle E^ast This is just a reminder that if you take into 
account the per capita population of pro-Israel Jews versus 
Palestinians and progressives, you have an overwhelming mjyority 
in favor of divestment. As in all areas of public debate when it 
comes to the Middle Elast, a vociferous few scuttle debate and fi-ee 
expression. It would be comforting to know you can withstand 
intimidation. Should you choose to do so, be prepared to contend 
with the label of anti-Semites. 

HaniBawardl 
Ann AriMN*, Ml 

Hold true to beliefs through opposition 

I found the necessity for your Special Letter to be a very 
depressing reflection on the pressures placed on you if you fail to 
conform to many of your readers' "opinions." Siinilar pressures 
have been put on major media companies, CNN, the New York 
Times, the Washington Post, etc. There seems to be a frightening 
impression that U.S. media will be prepared to distort reality*if 
enough pressure is placed on it 

It is a result of this pressure, in my opinion, that Americans are 
about as ignorant